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Old 12-29-2011, 01:07 AM   #11
zoomzoom
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10 years was just a number I picked out of thin air. I'm sure that with regular maintenance and good care it would last indefinitely. Calfee's frame has a 10year warranty vs a 1 year for the frame I have which is more or less what you'll get on an average carbon fiber bike. Calfee's cost almost 9 times more though. The boo bicycle frame which is a bamboo carbon fiber mix also has a 10 year warranty. Bottom line is, having the lugs come loose is the last thing I'm worried about. Pandas on the other hand, those are a real threat!



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Old 12-29-2011, 01:47 AM   #12
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"Personally I wouldn't buy a bike that had a 10 year life expectancy, that would be a waste of money."

Most of the frames I've owned in the last twenty years cracked well before they were ten years old. Seven or eight in total, steel and aluminum.



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Old 12-29-2011, 04:36 AM   #13
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Cracks in steel or aluminum can be repaired. Bamboo could be repaired as well. Many of the current glues on the market are stronger than the wood itself and the wood will fail before the glue bonding the crack together will fail. Properly cared for the bamboo frame should last a long time.

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Old 12-29-2011, 04:42 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by qmsdc15 View Post
"Personally I wouldn't buy a bike that had a 10 year life expectancy, that would be a waste of money."

Most of the frames I've owned in the last twenty years cracked well before they were ten years old. Seven or eight in total, steel and aluminum.
What the heck are you doing to your bikes? Or, why do you think their breaking if your not doing anything to cause the damage?

I have a bike I bought new in 84, it has 150,000 miles on it, the frame is still good to go, though the paint is not after 19 years of S. California sun. And 10 of those years were racing all over S. California.

I don't know anyone who has your kind of luck with frames...I did know one guy though, he was a body builder weighed around 240. His first bike was one of the Vitus 749 models, after a month the frame was broke, Vitus replaced, about a month later it broke. By the time the 3rd one was replaced he heard about Klien so he got it and hung up the 3rd Vitus which he never rode, this I think was around 1989. about 8 months later the Klien broke, Klien replaced, the 2nd one lasted 5 years and it broke, so he bought a Cannondale, broke two of those in roughly a 7 year period. Then he decides to try steel, so he contacted Grant at Rivendell and told Grant his problems and that he wanted a bike to go touring with. Grant had a Rivendell built to handle the demands of this guy. That was in 2003, my friend has been touring on that bike every summer since then and rides it when not touring...it hasn't broke, but it's not been 10 years old yet either. The Vitus still hangs in his garage never mounted.
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Old 12-29-2011, 06:42 PM   #15
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What the heck are you doing to your bikes?
Riding for a delivery service.
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Old 12-29-2011, 11:36 PM   #16
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Riding for a delivery service.
Really? Well if that's true, then no wonder you broken all types of bikes.
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Old 12-30-2011, 12:02 AM   #17
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I try to unweight when I go over potholes and curbs, but I do overload it sometimes.


A bamboo bike I spotted in my travels.








2x5 shifting. The front shifts by hitting the button in the middle of the crank with your heel.

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Old 12-30-2011, 12:06 AM   #18
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Can we see some close ups of zoom's boo bike?

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Old 12-30-2011, 12:36 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by qmsdc15 View Post
I try to unweight when I go over potholes and curbs, but I do overload it sometimes.


A bamboo bike I spotted in my travels.








2x5 shifting. The front shifts by hitting the button in the middle of the crank with your heel.
I had no idea when you said delivery you meant that!! I thought you might deliver contracts or the such. Then I thought you were putting me on!!!

I can see why you break bikes, my god man that must be quiet a workout hauling stuff like that around town.

Have you looked into industrial bikes made for that kind of work? Trek corporation has a Gary Fisher bike called the Transport which is designed to do what you do; see: Transport+ - Trek Bicycle

I do have to say this; I've never seen a bicycle doing what you do here in America, I've seen similar stuff in third world countries, just not here.
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Old 12-30-2011, 01:20 PM   #20
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I would like to see a Trek Transport transport the load in the picture I posted of my trailer!

I've looked into all the options and found the Bikes@Work trailer to have greater capacity than a cargo bike, less costly and easier to store. The wheelbase on the Transport is short, notice most of the cargo area is behind the rear axle. Put a couple hundred pounds behind the axle and watch out!


Surly Big Dummy is a more capable cargo bike, but I don't have space to store one and it can't carry as much. My rig can carry more than some cars, and it does on occasion.

Most of the frames cracked before I started hauling freight. I was a regular bike messenger for many years.

The reason you only see cargo bikes in China and India is because those are the only places you can live off what this job pays!



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