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Old 12-07-2012, 04:49 PM   #1
Farrowlane
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The Best in Urban Commuters

Today's urban bicycle commuter has to surmount many challenges. There are the frequent road irregularities, due to unkempt roads during this recession. We also have the oily, wet, and snow covered pavement with which to contend.

In addition to road conditions, there are the inconsiderate and absent minded automobile drivers who constantly cut us off and open parked car doors as we're passing. There are the ever-increasing texters, who only focus upon the road between letters. Then there are the taxi cab drivers who I am convinced, are all on contract to kill us! That's not to mention the large trucks who suddenly swing out right, only to turn left. I think they're out to get us, too!

Today, the commuting cyclist needs a bicycle that is durable, nimble, and versatile. Most road bikes, don't qualify, as their tires are usually too narrow for the daily road irregularities and riding while in the drops does not place a commuter in a very good position for traffic observation.

Double suspended MTN bikes are overkill on the weight, and make for very inefficient, energy absorbing, commuting monsters.

However, most Hybrids and Hardtail MTN bikes with rigid forks, make great commuting bicycles. Their handlebars allow you to sit more upright where you can more easily view both traffic and pedestrians, alike. Their tire widths are generally wider than any performance road bike. That means that they can better grip the road and are less likely to suffer flats, as well. You can also more easily install a rack, or perhaps even fenders to a hybrid or a MTB, due to more available eyelets.

Then there's the Touring and Cyclocross bicycles. These bicycles, when equipped with cross brake levers, make for the ultimate in commuting. While your hand position is firmly placed upon the hoods, you can more easily observe traffic. Since, you have cross brakes, hands on hoods presents no safety issues with braking. These bikes typically come with much wider tires, too. That's especially so when your Touring or Cyclocross bike comes from either Surly or Salsa, the QBP bicycles. They are usually at the top of my list when considering commuting conditions.

My favorite Touring/Commuter of all times is the Surly Long Haul Trucker.
It's a veritable truck when it comes to speed, but for the money, you just can't beat it for loaded touring and when unladen, it can slice right through all of the urban road irregularities, due to its wide tire option.

It's quite a versatile bike for the money...

OTOH

If I lived in Chicago, Florida, or New York City, I'd commute almost exclusively on a single speed, as long as they'd have cross brake levers!



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Old 12-07-2012, 08:38 PM   #2
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Old 12-07-2012, 09:58 PM   #3
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What would you consider to be the best component group in a commuter?
For instance I feel 105 is the work horse of the road group in Shimano's offerings. If I was to offer for trade a road bike with full 105 group what should I expect in a hybrid?

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Old 12-07-2012, 10:36 PM   #4
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What would you consider to be the best component group in a commuter?
For instance I feel 105 is the work horse of the road group in Shimano's offerings. If I was to offer for trade a road bike with full 105 group what should I expect in a hybrid?
I'd say that the Deore LX or XT Gruppos would be the more likely candidates. However, I'd settle for plain ole Shimano Deore, as well.

I'd aslo settle for anything above Sram X5...Though X9 would be most appreciated

On certain performance hybrids like the Specialized Sirrus models, I'd keep the 105 Gruppo!
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Old 12-07-2012, 10:48 PM   #5
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This bike was just listed locally two hours ago. What can you make from the pictures. I dont want to contact the seller for a week or so for more information. I like to wait a few weeks but the listing price is pretty low and I could offer 75 less if it wont move. Of course I will also try to get the U-Lock included.
http://tinyurl.com/ad63be4

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Old 12-07-2012, 11:42 PM   #6
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Quote:
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What would you consider to be the best component group in a commuter?
I'm sticking with Shimano Nexus. Here's the cupcake delivery vehicle on black Friday. I have to swap out the rear cog to try and get rid of some of that chain slack. I'll be sad if I have to run a tensioner. It will probably make some noise, ruining an otherwise silent ride.


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Old 12-07-2012, 11:51 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Industry_Hack View Post
I'm sticking with Shimano Nexus. Here's the cupcake delivery vehicle on black Friday. I have to swap out the rear cog to try and get rid of some of that chain slack. I'll be sad if I have to run a tensioner. It will probably make some noise, ruining an otherwise silent ride.
Nice bike, Hack!
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Old 12-07-2012, 11:53 PM   #8
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This bike was just listed locally two hours ago. What can you make from the pictures. I dont want to contact the seller for a week or so for more information. I like to wait a few weeks but the listing price is pretty low and I could offer 75 less if it wont move. Of course I will also try to get the U-Lock included.
http://tinyurl.com/ad63be4
That's a fair deal, if it fits and has no structural issues...

PS.

I'd most probably offer $150 and try not to get too close to $200!
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Old 12-07-2012, 11:59 PM   #9
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Industry. Do you have the option of changing the input sprocket on your hub? That may help in getting the slack out without the use of a tensioner.

How many pennies has that project set you back so far?

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Old 12-08-2012, 12:01 AM   #10
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Nice bike, Hack!
Thanks. It's been on my list of projects to do for a while. You can read the intro to it here. For the snow bike, check here.


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