Bike and Cycling Forum > Bike Forums > Beginners Forum > I'm getting back into riding again after a very long absense from it. Any tips


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Old 12-19-2012, 02:09 AM   #1
Cookieguy07
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I'm getting back into riding again after a very long absense from it. Any tips

I want to get starTed but don't want to be ok lets go do a long ride and be sore. So whats the best way to get started and if your one like myself how did you get back into the swing of.riding?

I was thinking should maybe ride around neighborhood and see how long can go b4 I Adventure to far from home. I'll have a diamondback insight so not a roadbike.

Any help

Thanks



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Old 12-19-2012, 02:11 AM   #2
Industry_Hack
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Pedal faster. Always.



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Old 12-19-2012, 02:13 AM   #3
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Don't forget to stretch. Take it slowly and build from there. Have fun!

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Old 12-19-2012, 02:14 AM   #4
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I think you should just get on the bike as often as possible and don't over think how to get back on the bike again.

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Old 12-19-2012, 01:45 PM   #5
SixtyPlus
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Some advice I got said to only ride a mile or so for the first several days then extend that as you begin to feel more comfortable. Worked for me and just passin' it along.

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Old 12-19-2012, 02:14 PM   #6
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Ride lots incrementally.

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Old 12-19-2012, 02:48 PM   #7
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Hey there Cookieguy07!

I say, let your first ride be to your LBS and have them inspect your bike for safety. Next, I would suggest that you join the nearest bicycle co-op, so that you may learn how to fix, maintain, and upgrade your own bike.

Become familiar with bus and train routes, so that you can travel greater distances in shorter amounts of time using regional motorized transit options, besides an automobile. Many bus companies these days have bike racks attached to their buses front bumpers. This can be a really convenient way to commute!

Also, you may want to invest in a bicycle computer (a cyclometer) that can record your current speed, your average speed, your trip distance, and the total mileage your bike has traveled since you've owned it (an odometer). You might even want one that records your rpms, or cadence. Make certain that your cyclometer is waterproof and has a clock too!

Additionally, you should consider buying a helmet and some gloves too, just in case you should suffer a fall, or some kinda collision or mishap. The gloves will serve as both extra cushion for riding comfort and as a protective covering for your skin. It's better that your gloves get all ripped up, instead of your skin. Gloves are real skin savers!

Finally, you're going to need some extra added safety and emergency equipment. Therefore, purchase a tire repair kit, a couple extra tubes, a bright headlight and a flashing rear red light, just in case you get a flat near dusk and be forced to ride in the dark.

You really should practice replacing old tubes with new tubes, before venturing out. That way, fixing a flat while you're cycling won't be nearly as stressful!

Use hand signals, if riding on the roads, just as if you were driving...

Good Luck!

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Last edited by Farrowlane; 12-19-2012 at 03:01 PM.
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Old 12-19-2012, 02:55 PM   #8
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Each ride try to push a little further. Before you know it you will be reaching milestones and reaching even farther after that. When I got started that was some of the same advice I received.

Learn to Spin
Push a little further each ride

Most of all enjoy the ride!

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Old 12-19-2012, 03:43 PM   #9
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My tip: Love it.

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Old 12-19-2012, 03:44 PM   #10
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I know that when I got back into it (and once again, now following surgery), I simply rode easily in my neighborhood. I'd do a mile or two and see how my legs felt. Make sure that your bike fits you properly, as this helps with the comfort.

Start slowly and don't push so hard that you pay a price and will not want to ride.



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