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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all

New to the forums. Been biking since I was 5 haha.

I was in the market for a MTB but a few deals fell through on some bikes. My dad heard I was looking for a bike and he gave me his old bike. I didn't even know he still had this thing. It was sitting in the attic or shed.

Anyway here it is. After some googling I found that the serial code that's under the pedals on the frame started with a "GH" so that indicates it was a 1972... I think.

The whole code is "GH819712"

She is a Schwinn Sprint that is Blue. She is dirty but not beat up or anything. I plan on taking it to the bike shop so they could look it over and give me an idea if its worth fixing up. Someday I would like to hand it down to my kids so I just may re-build it anyway.

On to the pics. :)




Serial code. Not the best pic:





Looks like my dad bought it straight from a Harley Davidson dealer. Maybe he couldn't afford a motorcycle so he opted for a 10 speed. haha



:)
 

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Evamas, IMO, get all the history, pics, etc, from your Dad on the bike. Rebuild,ride as you
see fit, then clean & polish. Store then lovingly pass it & history to your children!! Keep those grand old wheels as an heirloom!!
 

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Hey Evamos,
That bike is a lot better than some of the bikes that I find! Plus...you know the bike! I bought a tool kit from eDiscountBike.com. on Amazon.com. It is item# K-97900." Super B 37 pc Home Mechanic Tool Kit Set".I paid $97.95+$17.05s+h=$115.00 total! Check it out! I have added some Park Tools plus I had some older "no brand" tools. I have been using this tool kit right from the time that I got it! It comes with a great case that I can bring with me when the family goes camping/biking this weekend!
Anyhow, Great solid, all round bike. I have gotten my Schwinn "finds" going in no time at all! The components usually respond to a good lubing real well. I have gotten away with just oiling the cable a lot of times! Schwinn riders seem to take extra good care of their bikes. You have to really convince these owners that you are going to take good care of their bike before they give them to you! I see these people in the course of my job, so, I see the prior bike owners all the time. I keep them posted!
Well. Went a little long! I eat, sleep bikes!
Good Luck! Have a blast!
Bill
 

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Ev-

Congratulations! You found yourself in almost the identical spot I was in a few weeks ago. My road bike got jacked, so I was looking to buy a used bike. After a few deals went south, I ended up with my dad's old Schwinn. His is an '80 Traveler. Looking at your pics, I would say both bikes were nearly in the same condition.

You can check out the thread I started and all the questions I asked here: http://www.twospoke.com/forum/f154/old-bike-needs-love-5871/

For more information on Schwinn serial numbers and date codes, check this site out:
Schwinn Serial Numbers and Date Codes

I got a ton of great help from the members of this forum, and put most of the advice I was given to great use with excellent results. I have some before, during and after pictures uploaded to the forum as well. You can see the pics here:
http://www.twospoke.com/forum/f137/hipster-deluxe-5868/

As for the reno, I upgraded the saddle to a Brooks B17. I installed new brake pads, tubes, tires, and pedals. After a grand total of maybe 5hrs work, it is now a (mostly)daily commuter and has been for the past month or so. It is still in need of new bar tape and brake cables, and maybe a little fine tuning. Other than that she rides like a dream.

Aside from the replacement parts the only other thing I really used was WD-40 and 0000-grade steel wool to get the rust off (If I recall correctly, this was billnuke's "spritzing" idea!)...which you can read about in my thread). In your case I might recommend a new chain and brake cables take greater priority than they did for me.

To throw my two cents in, I would really push for you to do most of the reno yourself. Personally I find it more rewarding, and when you hand the bike off to your kids it will mean that much more to all of you. Whatever route you choose to take, happy riding!
 

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Ah yes what a nice find she's pretty sweet. I agree with Last_Place_Pete try doing the work yourself I am on an old bike I had given to me. As Pete said it is very rewarding knowing you fixed her up again. New tires tubes cables etc the basics to get her road worthy again be a fun project and ride in the end nice find for sure good luck keep us posted with pics.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the words of encouragement. I have been leaning twoards the work myself. I am pretty mechanically savvy. I mean I have done a frame up resto of a wrangler and many other 4 wheel vehicle modifications... but that's for another forum.:D

I plan on finding a seat and post (my dad couldn't locate the original), brakes, tires, chain, and cables are on the list of things to buy. I am pretty exited to get this project undergoing. I'm sure I will have plenty of questions for you all as I undergo this cherry popping bike project. haha

First question...

Where is the best place to source parts. Local bike stores? online?
 

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Let me throw in a couple of thoughts. From the perspective of handing it down to your kids, its worth doing. Yet if you let the bike shop do all the work, it probably will cost a fortune. Most of the stuff you can do yourself. Its time consuming but not that hard.

First thing to do is give it a bath and see what you have. The find a local bike shop and let them measure it for a seat post and saddle. The seat post size is critical and getting the right one is important. While there you can get some feedback on what the bike needs. Most good bike shops are more than happy to provide information on how to install most things. IF you really get in over your head, they will bail you out. But most of the time a good wrench can explain to you how to do things, and the big plus is you learn about the bike. You pay more for the part, but the information source at your local bike shop is a bargain. With your mechanical skills, most things shouldn't be that tough.

What I wouldn't do is totally repaint the frame right away. Instead you know any good paint and body should should be able to mix a paint to exactly match. The more original the better the keepsake for you kids, after all its almost exactly like it was when you grand dad rode it. Treat the touchup much like you would an auto touch up and then you really might be surprised what a good coat of wax will do. The rust on the cranks an other parts will probably clean up better than you think. Worst case is a rechome, or repaint those parts. You probably know lots of ways to clean rust, but one tip I learned here that worked well for me on another type of project was lemon juice and aluminum foil. I thought it might be crazy too till I saw it work.

You are on the right track with what you think it needs. Tires and tubes for sure, just for piece of mind. If the tires have been on the bike that long, regardless of how they look, Id replace them. Id also replace the brake pads for sure. Cables, if they are not frayed or rusted Id not be too concerned for a while. If for some reason they have to come off for something else, change them then. Chain you might be able to get by for a while if its not too rusted or worn, but there is a chain wear checker that can tell you if its too worn to be serviceable.

Now for the part you might not think about. Some bikes of that age have bearings in the bottom bracket that may need to be greased or lubed. If you hear noises when you pedal, its time to check it out. The bearings are loose and have cups ect and it all can get frustrating getting it all back together. Modern bottom brackets are sealed and the bottom bracket has treads so it just screws in. I mentioned doing something like this to my local bike shop wrench and he suggested an adapter that would allow modern bottom brackets to be used. Might be something to consider.

Since it was your dads I'd get it like I wanted it. This is one is special and should be treated better than a bike you found at a garage sale for $10. Even if it cost 10 times what the bike is worth, at some point it just might be priceless.
 

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G,day dude it looks like your going down the same road as I'm on and must say going by the serial number that bike is from 1981 at the oldest, certainly early 80's to mid 80's.
I would say it was one of Schwinn's lower end models on the same level as my Ricardo featured on this site.
But thats no reason not to put your hart and soul into rebuilding it and one great thing about these old 1020 steel frames is there very robust and built to last they also fit 700c, 32c cyclocross tires for extra ride comfort if you wish.
I've got a little known trick for refurbishing all your chrome and metal and alloy parts nuts and bolts etc. etc.
1. A nice big plastic tub with a lid, big enough for the whole crank set as thats about he biggest thing you'll put in there.
2.Fill it with kerosene so all your parts are totally submerged for a day or two and give them a good scrub with a stiff brush when you take them out.
3. If you have a air compressor thats a big help if not just wipe them down with a rag and dry out a bit.
4. This is the big trick where the real results come from, fill your tub with Brown Vinegar you can buy this in Two litre containers from your local food store. Totally submerge your parts and leave them for 24 or more hours.
5. When you remove your parts from the tub rinse them under a tap and use a basin kitchen cleaner here we have a product called Jif cream cleanser or use similar and scrub them with a tooth brush and rinse.
6. Its good to blast all the water out with a compressor or just spray them good with a water dispersent like WD40.
If you follow all this you will thank me and you can repeat the brown vinegar trick as much as you want but usually once is enough all your rust will be gone parts will be new again.
Good luck with your rebuild I'm keen to see your progress.:)
 

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howdy, just turn it ito a SS CB. gearing...39/18. look at my bike to check out 1 of my rides
 
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