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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just posted a similar post in the unicycle forum, but basically just wanted to alert anyone interested, that there is a small but growing scene of 22 inch wheel BMX riders.

FACTION Bikes in the UK started the high end 22" bmx back in 2008, but when their complete model (the Zeitgeist) sold out, a number of guys have been getting top quality frames made by STANDARD, Solid, and STOUT, as well as forks made by S&M.

see:
22 inches of Love - it feels just right

I'm trying to get the word out there in order to increase demand for rims and tires. What kind of interest is there in the Trials scene for a 22 inch option?
 

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Biking With a Mission
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I honestly don't feel like there would be much of a desire for a 22 inch trials frame. We've already got 26", 24", and 20" along with kids bikes of smaller sizes. 24" street trials bikes have been around for a while, but 24" pure trials bikes are starting to take off and are a good in between style for a lot of riders. I don't see there to be a need or market for another size.

One of the biggest factors is tires. Sure you can weld a 22" frame, and get some company to build you rims fairly cheap. But without super amazing sticky, high volume, pinch resistant, kick butt tires no trials rider would even look at it. And the market would be too small to get manufacturers to make them. Unfortunately BMX tires just don't work for trials.

Trials is an extremely small market, especially compared to bmx. It would not be too hard for some niche corner of bmx to do more production than trials as a whole.
 

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I didnt know there was a new wheel size emerging. Thats pretty interesting, options are always good, but tires will be a limiting factor. I could see it getting popular, but it will take time.
There was 24" trials bikes back in the 90s, probably even earlier, and even so it took a while for them to gain widespread acceptance again.

Sort of makes sense, more rollability than the 20 but not as cumbersome as the 24, same argument as has been made for the 24 over the 20 and 26.
Is it really necessary? Who knows, guys were doing incredible stuff on (essentially) standard MTBs back in the day, so I definitely believe skill and practice trumps equipment, to a degree anyway.

Time will tell where this goes.
One thing I do like though is that we're seeing small companies responding to market desires, and trying new things.
 
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