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Two skinny J's
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I remember it well. It was a cool morning an I had sweatshirt and jacket on that morning. I was totally shocked as I watched what was happening. I knew for sure we were headed for the next big one, glad that didn't happen. Funny how you can remember details of a day like that clear as if it had just happened.


I can remember when the space shuttle Challenger blew up as well. I was home for lunch and it was all over the news. Could not believe what I was seeing then either!
 

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I remember President Kennedy's assasination like it was yesterday. I was four years old and home with my mother. I had never seen my mother cry before and I was terrified watching her cry.
 

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I was home to change from doing morning physical training at work. I made a snack turned on the television and couldn't believe what I saw.
 

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I showed my ex photos of New York I took in 1995 before we went there in 2004. I still don't think she understood. This was taken during a Circle Line cruise on my birthday, 1995. In 2004, it was just a big hole in the ground.
 

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Turned down work that day as I watched history unfold before my unbelieving eyes that day.:(

As for the shuttle, I was carrying in firewood as I watched it happen on tv. My first of unforgettable of nationally unforgettable moments.:(
 

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I was in the Dirksen Senate Office Building when the Pentagon was struck. The roads of DC were gridlocked as were the phone networks. I was assigned to transport video tape between AP headquarters and the Pentagon. Video from the scene would normally be uplinked to satellite but the lines were jammed. Bicycle was the fastest way to move. Subway was shut down. I saw people walking home as far as Columbia Pike, a couple miles from downtown and many walked over five miles to get home. A few hours after the attack, DC was a ghost town.
 

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It was a beautiful day. Sunny, a few puffy clouds.

I was just off-shift, at my girlfriend's (now wife) house. I was pulling in to the driveway and heard on the radio a plane struck one of the towers. I went in, saw it and saw the second plane hit. My father was a block away.

Still in uniform, I got back in my car right behind USAR Task Force 1.

Most guys went to the station to get ready to roll-out, I went on my own to find my father.

I spent 3 days looking for my father.

The aftermath was unreal. One of my most stifling memories was coming over the Morris hill on Route 24 with my girlfriend/wife on the back of my motorcycle and the entire skyline was gray. Just debris hanging in the air.

Every single guy I knew at Engine 24/Ladder 5 was killed. Andy Brunn, a probie, it was his very first shift. Lt. Giamona, one of the funniest guys I've met; smart and loved practical jokes, regardless of the victim's rank.

What hurts me is the after-effects. So many of these guys have lung problems from breathing all of that crap in. It was so quiet for days after. The Search and Rescue dogs are sick now and receive no benefits, it is on the owner/handler to pay for their care. I realize that anyone born in 1996 and later has no clue what happened. they were too young to grasp the gravity of what was happening.

This is my first year working on the 11th, most of us would spend the day at the firehouse, quiet and comtemplative. Out of fire/rescue and in my current field, I have to be at work today.

I feel sick about it and had a tough time riding in today. I still cannot imagine what went through the peoples' minds that had to choose:

"Plummet to my death?"
"Burn to death?"

Those of us that had a job to do that day and the weeks afterwards have a very different perspective that those that try to play the blame game. Conspiracy theorists, talking heads, etc. No idea. Armchair quartebacking is easy when you have a nice cup of coffee and your feet up on an ottoman.

Do yourselves a favor and listen to Bruce Springsteen's "In to the Fire".

You'll get a better grasp of what it was like.
 

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as a memorial on our MUP 2 homeschool students lined the 14 mile trail with small AMERICAN flags 1 for every person killed that sad sad day. ill try and get a pic of it today.
 

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Two skinny J's
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Discussion Starter #9
as a memorial on our MUP 2 homeschool students lined the 14 mile trail with small AMERICAN flags 1 for every person killed that sad sad day. ill try and get a pic of it today.
Very nice tribute. Can't wait to see the photo.
 

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That was the absolute worst week my family ever had. The Saturday before, we put my 95 year old father into a hospice house with organ failure. We were expecting it, but wasn't sure when we would have to make that move. My daughter and her family drove down from Lexington, Kentucky on Sunday because we knew he wasn't going to be with us much longer. My son-in-law left for Kentucky on Monday morning and my daughter and two grandsons left the morning of the 11th, on a flight to Louisville.

I was at my friends gun shop, helping him out that day. I went home as soon as the word came out about the planes that were being hijacked. When we heard that a plane was hijacked in that area (the one that crashed in Pennsylvania) and couldn't get any information about which flight it was, my wife pretty much had a nervous breakdown. We couldn't get any information from the airlines or anyone else and all cell lines were jammed. Much later that afternoon, my daughter got an open cell line and called us. Her plane was diverted to Cincinnati, where she found a lady that lived in Louisville and was able to get a rental car. She got home at 2:30 the morning of the 12th, the day my father passed away. They got in the car and drove back to Tampa that afternoon.
 

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John-

I think your wife is a perfect example of the collateral damage from that day. I do not believe many people are aware of the "ripple effect" through emotional trauma that has affected many, many people.

I remember the days after I thought to myself "**** this ****". . .

Other than some times with my daughter, I have never, ever felt so helpless.
 

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I was working nights and was sleeping during the day. My brother came in the room to tell me and turned on the TV. I was in utter shock. It was one of those time lapse situations where it was standing still. Overload was the feeling just shock and overload. My first reaction was no this is a hoax, then after flipping channels it was confirmed. Then I got sick.

Again one of those moments you NEVER forget.

John, that was rough to read, one of those "I dont know what to say" moments.
 

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Knee, my hat is off to you! Not because they were "brothers" in service, but they were friends. The memories are vivid and the pain is still there. There are no words to explain the inner feelings that ran through my mind eleven years ago. Sad day for this great nation. The good is that this is a GREAT NATION and we remember and we have moved on. I am proud to be an AMERICAN!
 

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Was at work when we heard...had to go home at lunchtime to see if it was really happening. When I watch the footage....it still feels like a movie. At the time I just thought....this is the end of the world
 

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Was riding my bike to work when my 7am client told me "we are under attack," brutal.
 
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