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21 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Sorry again for all the questions.

I have quick release wheels and disc brakes.

The fellow at the bike store told me when i put the front wheel on to eyeball the rotor, and center it up between the two pads , then tighten down the wheel.

However, the axle does sit completely down (or up) in the notches.

Whats the trick here?

And also check me here. For tightness, I tighten it down so that the lever leaves a mark on my hand when i close it , but then i check to see if the wheel is moving freely by moving the reflector to the 3 o'clock position and see if it falls to the bottom. I adjust accordingly.
 

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Total noob (& forum admin)
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12,350 Posts
Your questions are fine. They actually benefit the forums, because you're asking questions that people are searching for on the internet right now.

I seat the forks over the axle, jiggle it a bit to make sure it's in place, then eyeball the disc. If all looks good, I flip the lever. You shouldn't have so much tension that it's hard to close, but it shouldn't be able to flip open if bumped casually. When you get a new bike, look for the Clix system, and never worry again.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Is it ok though if the axle is not seated the whole way into the notches? If i just put the wheel on and let pegs on each side of the wheel bottom out, the disc rubs the pads. I have been shifting the wheel a little bit so the disc is straight, but the peg on the one side of the wheel is not seated the whole way and i just was not sure if that was correct
 

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Total noob (& forum admin)
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12,350 Posts
You have a hollow axle, with a skewer running through it, just so we have the terminology correct.

It's entirely possibly that the dropouts (slots in the fork) are not perfectly even, but if you think about it, the axle isn't higher or lower on one side, only the dropout is. That would tilt your wheel something terrible if the axle wasn't perfectly level. Does that make sense?
 

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Total noob (& forum admin)
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12,350 Posts
No worries about the terminology. I appreciate that you want to learn more about your bike, rather than just blindly taking it to the shop. You're far more likely to stick with cycling if you understand how your bike works.
 

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spin... spin.. spin
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1,616 Posts
hack, you are a good guy and it makes me happy to be here at twospoke when guys like you and Mark explain things so well and do it with respect and kindness.

to the op... always ask it is the only way to learn. i understand three things in life bicycles, fly-fishing and honesty all three because i spent my childhood asking about them. everyone most likely has three or more things they understand and if we work together we collectively understand thousands of things. also none of us knew anything about bikes at one time in our lives... then we watched asked and learned by error. some of us were young and others a little older. while i rarely ask bike tech questions anymore i am certain i know the least about life and other things than anyone else on here. happy spinning.
 
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