Advice on clipless pedals

Discussion in 'Beginners Forum' started by Jeriatric, Feb 17, 2010.

  1. Jeriatric

    Jeriatric New Member

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    after years of riding with toe clips, i have decided to give my big toes a break and buy clip less pedals and shoes.

    i am 75 yrs old (76 in two more weeks) and enjoy riding bike-a-thons in new york, philadelphia and connecticut (avg. distance 35-45 miles). i average 50 miles a week on flat course riding (weather permitting).

    i am a cruiser. my big toes take a beating on climbs. i have tried a number of different shoes with the toe clips.

    i was advised to buy a used set of sidi genius shoes and shimano dura ace 7810 pedals to ease my toe clip annoyance. the used set is about $175. i can get some used shimano dura ace 7550 or 7800 pedals on ebay cheaper....i just don't know what the difference is, they all look the same. on fixed income, a new set is not an option this year. the shoes fit but the owner of the set says i should buy his 7550 pedals because the cleats have been matched to the pedals and they have a 6° float (???).

    my bike is a 10 speed; 52/44 chain ring, 14/18/22/27/34 cassette. for this coming season, i have changed my chain ring to 48/38 (the bike shop made the derailleur adjustments. i am hoping that the reduced gears and new pedals and shoes will help my hill climbing in the upcoming bike tours (especially connecticut).

    any comments and/or advice would be appreciated.
     

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  2. Xela

    Xela New Member Tavern Member

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    Great to have you! Welcome to TwoSpoke!

    The degrees of float is how much rotation your foot is allowed while clipped. 6 is about the minimum I would recommend. The more float, the more misalignment you are allowed which is usually easier on the knees. My pedals allow me to have 9 degrees, 4, or zero depending upon which cleat I install. I run with the 9 degrees and don't think I would want to go lower.

    I don't know much about the Shimano pedals so I will leave that to others to discuss with you. The only real drawback I see is the single-sided entry which can sometimes make take-offs a little ackward. My pedals are single-sided, too, and it sometimes (though rare) is a little hastle. On the road side of things, Speedplay pedals offer two-sided entry.

    I wouldn't let the "cleats matched to the pedals" be a deal breaker. Honestly, this just seems like a ploy to get you to buy the set.

    The Sidi's are a good idea, in my opinion. They are great-fitting, well made, and last. They also have really stiff soles, which means they will let you put more power to the pedals. Also, since a clipless pedal has less area for your foot, stiff soles allow you distribute your pedal force over a larger area, instead of just concentrating it at the shoe/pedal interface.

    So you have tried the Sidis on, to know they fit. Correct? If not, I advise you to, because Sidis tend to run a little narrow.

    Best of luck!
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2010

  3. chh55

    chh55 Drink plenty of water!!!

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    You are in for a treat! Switching to clipless pedals and shoes makes a big difference. The new rings will really help your climbing too. For your type of riding you don't need Dura Ace pedals and don't let anyone talk you into a brand of shoe (Sidis ARE nice however!) because you need to find a pair that fits you perfectly before you buy. Try lots before you buy. Then which pedal you use is really not a huge issue. The Shimano 105 pedal is not bad at all and a good deal new, LOOK KéOs are my choice, they come in a range of differnt prices and models. Look around, there's loads to choose from. DO NOT buy older, especially used, Dura Ace 7700 pedals!
    You may want to look into getting mountain bike shoes and SPD pedals... Why? Because they are easier to walk around in if you stop for coffee or to and from the car... etc. You should not walk in road shoes on pavement at all as this wears out the cleats very quickly and damages the soles as well.
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2010
  4. chh55

    chh55 Drink plenty of water!!!

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  5. chh55

    chh55 Drink plenty of water!!!

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    BTW there is no such animal as a DA 7550
     
  6. Industry_Hack

    Industry_Hack Total noob (& forum admin) Admin Staff Tavern Member

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    How are your knees? Not many folks in my family have made it to your age, so don't think I'm picking on you when I ask, but are your knees in good shape? While clipless will make your pedal stroke more efficient, if you have had any knee injuries or rotational issues, even 9 degrees of float may not be comfortable. Unclipping requires a simple rotation, but one that's brutal if you've had a tear or chondromalacia.
     
  7. Jeriatric

    Jeriatric New Member

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    thanks to all for your input.

    (i mistyped; it should have read - dura ace 7750)

    the sidi shoes fit, (i tried on a new sidi euro 45 mega) but i am concerned about the 'float' as pointed out by 'industry hack' on the dura ace pedals.

    i had no idea changing from toe clips would be this involved. but from all comments, the change will be more than justified for several reasons, but i'll take my time. this will be, at my age, more than likely my last upgrade within my budget.

    from what i've read, the dura ace 7810 is a more than adequate pedal for me in all tour weather conditions (heavy rains, mud and even light snow...n.y. 2007). and from what i've read, there should be no need to upgrade, with proper maintenance, within the next five or six years (or ever). my personal best has been a little over 2000 miles in one year (a 'kid' of 67 years old). i hope to exceed that distance with my lower gears this year....with or without clipless.

    can dura ace 7810 pedals be adjusted to more than 6° float? or is the cleats that need to be adjusted?

    several used sets, with cleats, have been sold in the $50 range with s/h. i opted not to buy before i got input and did some research....$50 is not a bargain if you have to buy another set in the near future. it's just $50 wasted and on my fixed income, that's not an option. better to be safe than sorry (old folks saying:))

    craigslist had a few listings, but i'm told that ebay has some protection plans. so i've concentrated my search on sales with some kind of return policy for used eqpt. shoes without pedals are ok for now, i'm patient.

    thanks again for your help and input.
     
  8. Industry_Hack

    Industry_Hack Total noob (& forum admin) Admin Staff Tavern Member

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    Someone already mentioned MTB shoes/pedals. I think they have more float options, and they're much less expensive too. Unless there's some reason that you must have the Sidi shoes, you could go with SPD and open up a jillion more possibilities.
     
  9. djcyberlegend

    djcyberlegend Group rookie

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    As far as eBay is concerned, whether or not you can return something depends on who's selling it. Some sellers accept returns and some don't.
     
  10. Industry_Hack

    Industry_Hack Total noob (& forum admin) Admin Staff Tavern Member

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    If you have a question about an ebay item, post a link to it here. It's always a gamble buying off ebay, but we can help you avoid the bad transactions.
     
  11. jeepster93

    jeepster93 New Member

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    Jeri...Welcome!!!

    I use mountain bike pedals on my new road bike.
    There are some sweet pedals in the mountain bike line. Shoes are MUCH more easy to walk in and clip into/out of, than are road bike specific pedals...in my opinion.
    I think there is more float in them too. I think they go to 10-12 degrees.
    Cheaper too.

    They don't look as dorky either...:D
     
  12. Jeriatric

    Jeriatric New Member

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    thanks.

    any recommendations? i can do searches on craigslist for used models.
     
  13. jeepster93

    jeepster93 New Member

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  14. Industry_Hack

    Industry_Hack Total noob (& forum admin) Admin Staff Tavern Member

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    Abaxo (on eBay) has some decent prices. You'll definitely want new shoes, to break them in properly to your feet.
     
  15. stdu007

    stdu007 New Member

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    abaxo not the best ebay seller ... agree with the great price but look to the shipping price !!! lot of bad comment on him ...

    look to these sellers

    Bicycle Supply
    ComCycle USA
    53X11 Bike Shop
     
  16. Industry_Hack

    Industry_Hack Total noob (& forum admin) Admin Staff Tavern Member

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    Spend some time looking at their shipping for single items, then their multi-item discount. They've found some formula that encourages buying more than one item, while at the same time, it doesn't apply to all items. They're not giving anything away, but they still have fair prices, even with shipping.
     
  17. fleeter

    fleeter The Bearded Wonder

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    the pedals that came with my bike are just cheap-o SPD pedals, and shimano makes (edit - I don't know if Shimano actually makes them anymore, but you can find them at some LBS's, and online) a decent SPD road shoe. Mind you, I believe it's pretty old technology when comparing to other pedaling systems, but it allows for a moderate amount of float, and the shoes (model RT-80 I believe) are really comfy.

    I agree with Industry -- if you've had knee problems, the exit off the pedals could be brutal.
     
  18. jagonz456

    jagonz456 New Member

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    speed play pedals

    wow industry hack read my mind. riding in the city you may want to take a look at speed play pedals. They are very easy to clip on and off, there easy on your knees. You can clip on while going up hill with no problems. As far as shoes you cant go wrong with sidi worth every penny.
     
  19. Industry_Hack

    Industry_Hack Total noob (& forum admin) Admin Staff Tavern Member

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    Hey, I have old man knees already. :)
     
  20. camilo

    camilo New Member

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    except speedplay are about the worst when it comes to walking. Downright hazardous, and extremely clumsy and prone to cleat malfunction (due to dirt, etc) They are great pedals for strict road riding, and are really the only truly unique design different than SPD-type and Look-type, but not one I'd pick for all around riding, touring, commuting, etc. I think there's much better two sided alternatives with adequate float, but that's just one guy's opinion.

    A good quality mountain or touring type shoe that is made for recessed cleats and any SPD-type two sided pedal will serve 99% of the purpose and efficiency of any road shoe and pedal, in my personal experience. The

    OP: There's a million options for pedals. No need to do a lot of research or price shopping: just buy some Shimano, Wellgo or Performance or Nashbar house brand two sided SPD-type pedals, or just buy some locally. I would recommend "SPD-Compatible" rather than "SPD-type", so that they're fully compatable with Shimano SPD cleats which are available anywhere, any time. Some look very similar, but aren't fully compatible. You really won't save an awful lot of money by spending a lot of time price shopping and they all work well and will last you as long as you need them to.

    As for shoes: if you like the Sidi Genius, look at the Sidi Dominator shoes - they are essentially identical in quality, fit, etc. to the Genius, differeing only in the sole.