Any Motobecane bike owners?

Discussion in 'Beginners Forum' started by Mike1jw, Aug 21, 2009.

  1. Mike1jw

    Mike1jw Member

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    I am seriously thinking about getting a road bike soon. I have a 22 year old Giant Sadona mountain bike (with 1.5 road tires) that I've been using for 25-30 mile rides on the road. I have heard some good reports from real people (not on the internet, but second hand through a friend) about buying from Bikesdirect.com. I noticed that in the manufacturer section of this forum Motobecane is not listed. Is there a reason for this?

    I'm not in a rush for this since the season is near its end and I also want to buy Speedplay Frog pedals and some shoes to get used to on this old bike of mine before crashing with my new road bike.

    I have definately been bittin buy road cycling, and can see myself going all out in this sport/hobby, but the funds are low and Motobecane seems like my best option. Any suggestions?

    Thanks
    Mike
     
  2. fatandslow

    fatandslow New Member

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    I've noticed such differences in the size of bikes that have the same nominal size marked on them that I'd be afraid to buy a bike without at least straddling it, and preferably riding it.
     

  3. jeepster93

    jeepster93 New Member

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    I have one.
    Got it from Bikes direct, in fact.

    I got one with a carbon fiber fork/seat stays and the Ultegra 2x10 speed groupo.(but only part of the groupo, some things were Ritchy, like handle bars, and headset and seatpost, it has an FSA crank)

    First off:
    I LOVE the bike!!!
    I love the groupo
    I love the ride
    I love the 18 pounds it weighs.
    It has a nice set of hand made wheels.
    The frame is good. The welds look fine.

    However...there were compromises made.

    It had a seat that was the single worst thing I ever sat on.
    The tires and tubes are cheap. My tires are wearing out after less than 1000 miles.
    The cables are cheap.
    No pedals
    I did not know or have a choice on things like cranks, or front gears(it would come with one of 3 ratios/cranks-no choice)
    There were several things I had no idea of what it would be.

    Am I happy?
    VERY

    Would I do it again?
    YES

    Would I recommend Motobecane?
    YES

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2009
  4. Mike1jw

    Mike1jw Member

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    Thanks for the post. The bike in your photo looks like the one I'm thinking of buying. The only other thing i'm worrying about is ordering the right size. I hear so much about fitting a bike, and even though there is a great savings from BD, two thousand dollars is still a lot of money for me to spend on a bike that's not my size. Anyway, as I mentioned, I have a little while yet because I still want to get pedals and get used to (crash) on my old bike first. As it looks now, I might not be buying until next year. I would like to ride as far into the winter as I can, but daylight (or lack of it) is also something to think about.

    Anyway, thanks for the post. I hope to hear from you if there are any developments (positive or negative) with your bike.

    Have Fun
    Mike
     
  5. jeepster93

    jeepster93 New Member

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    Fit IS important.

    There are threads on this site, ongoing about fit. Read these before ordering.
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2009
  6. mtndoc

    mtndoc New Member

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    Have you thought of lookin at the bike at your local bike shop to get an idea of fit? You might talk to the owner of the shop and see if he can match the price, remember shipping and other costs involved with ordering online. I order a lot of stuff online since it is 50miles to the nearest city, and have to look at all factors to decide where to buy stuff. Just an idea.

    My brother had a motobecane bike years ago and still talks about it, he had to sell it to survive, but otherwise he would still be riding it, so it is a great bike according to him, for whatever that might be worth. Good luck on your choice.

    DrB
     
  7. sp9861

    sp9861 Guest

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    I got my main mountain bike through bikesdirect.com and I thought it was a good investment. Its a Windsor Cliff 4300 I think, I really wanted to buy from a LBS but all they had was expensive Giant bikes out of my price range and out of my skill level. I had my skeptics about getting a mail order bike but in reality it was so inexpensive that If I were to break something I could replace it with no worries. The only other thing that worried me was tune ups and etc. But buying online I learned some of the skills myself which I think is a better value towards me. If I were to buy another bike it would more then likely be another mail order bike from bikesdirect.com
     
  8. bantam700

    bantam700 New Member

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    nearly all higher end bikes do not include pedals, and while a bit humorous it's actually for a good reason. Most people buying low end bike are probably not going to use a cleat system and if they do it'll probably be an spd system so bike shops can just throw on a basic spd pedal and most will be happy. People who buy mid to high end bikes will almost always have a cleat system the prefer over the others, and since cleats are not compatible with different pedals bike shops and manufacturers will leave out pedals to keep the price down a bit by not including pedals with will probably be the first thing to be swapped out when the bike is bought
     
  9. Mike1jw

    Mike1jw Member

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    When you got your bike from BD, was the assembly difficult? I'm sure I can put some nuts and bolts together with directions ( I am mechanicly inclined) What I'm worried about is things like truing wheels, adjusting crank bearings, cables, and fine tuning.

    BD seems like they cover themselves by saying the bike should be taken to a bike shop for assemble.

    Mike
     
  10. jeepster93

    jeepster93 New Member

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    It was fairly easy to assemble.
    It was VERY well packed and boxed, even UPS tried and could not tear up the package to the point of hurting the bike inside.

    The fork is off, but the bearings and brakes are installed on it.
    The handlebars are off, so is the bar stem, but the shifters, brakes and in my case with a road bike, the bar tape was already installed.
    The seat needs mounting.
    Pedals were not included with my bike.

    You will need to string the brake cables and hook the brakes up, and adjust them.
    You will need to set the proper angles for the handlebars(for a road bike).
    You will need to adjust the shifting as the cables are strung but not adjusted.
    Put air in the tires and install them...
    You are with a ride-able bike!

    About an hour for someone like me...a shade tree mechanic.
    Not something I would do to an expensive product if I had NO mechanical skills.
     
  11. Mike1jw

    Mike1jw Member

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    Thanks, great reply!

    I have my eye on pretty much the same bike as yours in the photo. Ti frame with Ultegra 6700 group. All for about $2,000. Its hard to resist, yet hard to buy without riding it.

    Just a few more questions, if you dont mind,

    Did it come with good instructions. I am handy with a lot of things, but I would like instructions. Also How do you like the ti frame? This is what bike shops like to tear down. They say it's not a qaulity frame, (ti is good but welds are bad, and so on they say.) Also I never road a ti frame bike before, how do you like it? Right now I have an aluminum frame hard tail mountain bike.

    Mike
     
  12. jeepster93

    jeepster93 New Member

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    I talked to MotobecaneUSA and Bikes direct before I purchased the bike and will tell you what I was told...

    1- the frame is made in one of the 3 bike factories in Taiwan(NOT CHINA), the same factory that makes name brand frames,(the Giant frame factory, which makes several "name brand" bikes).
    2- the ti material is the EXACT SAME titanium used on the other bikes( You just wont know what alloy as Motobecane buys what is there, so if the factory was using 305, you get 305, if the factory was using 310(making another name brand) you get 310)
    3- the welds are welded by the EXACT SAME people that welded the name brand bike.
    4- the frame is THE SAME FRAME the name brands use, it just has MOTOBECANE stickers on it instead of TREK or??? stickers on it.
    Kind of like an overstock/overrun frame.
    5- the carbon fiber is the same as used in the name brand bikes, blah, blah.
    6- the groupo...Shimano Ultegra 6700 is Shimano Ultegra 6700.
    7- Specialized was NOT gonna let me test ride their ti $2500 bike either.
    8- the frame has a lifetime warranty

    However...the instructions blew! They were kind of a generic bike book, not even really made for my particular bike and was close to useless. Bikes Direct sell a DVD for $30 that explains how to assemble their high end bikes, if you are not going to take it to an lbs...buy the dvd. You DO get all the instructions that comes with the groupo though.


    How do I like my bike?

    I LOVE MY BIKE!!!:love::D

    It weighs almost nothing- 16 pounds out of box, after pedals and a more padded/comfortable seat, bottle cages, a speed computer it weight less than 18 pounds, like 17 pounds 6 ounces on the street for a 58 cm bike...not bad!
    It has a nice set of hand made wheels on it
    It is so fast, it is almost scary
    It is stiff, but the carbon fiber is a great shock absorber. Not as stiff as an aluminum frame, but I was never a fan of the ride aluminum gives anyway. Reminds me of the way CROMO steel bikes rides(but without the weight)

    I will go take a pic of a weld and post it so you can at least see how it put together...
     
  13. jeepster93

    jeepster93 New Member

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    Ok...

    Took a few pics.

    Remember as you look at these pic, this bike has 2000 miles on it and I spend a good amount of time on the Highline canal trail, which is dirt, so there is a lot of dust on my bike.

    This is the front fork, you can see the flat bladed spokes too.
    [​IMG]

    Here is the rear cluster.(with a replaceable hanger)
    [​IMG]

    Here is the bottom bracket, notice the outboarded bearings, don't know the why of outboarding them but it is what it is.
    [​IMG]

    The head tubes...
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2009
  14. Mike1jw

    Mike1jw Member

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    I am almost there! This bike gives me goose bumps every time I look at the specs and pics! There's only one more thing (a BIG thing) that's holding me back from ordering one of these babies right now- FIT.

    I followed the instuctions on the BD site, and using the spine of a book, pressed up into my crouch, with my (walkable) riding shoes on, is 35 3/4" . I am 6' 1" tall (no shoes)
    According to the BD sizing chart, the 59 cm frame has a 33" stand over hieght. I emailed (another thing I'm not crazy about with dealing with BD, I wish you could call someone) and gave them my measurments and told them I would like to ride with a more upright position and they recomended the 59 cm frame, but saying that I'm responsible for the the final choice. I read one post (I cant remember where) from someone who said they were 6' tall, and felt a 56 cm frame was too big for them :confused: I read in your post that you have a 58 cm frame. Can I ask, how tall are you?

    I find it hard to believe that I would need the largest frame size that the bike comes in. I'm tall, but I know that bike frames are made for much taller people then me.

    The bike shop that I just found stesses fit, and spends a lot of time fitting you and letting you test ride different bikes making sure you are comfortable. They say it's the most important thing to riding. As a matter of fact, I was very interested in a Giant TCR bike with 105 components, asking how much it would cost me. When then found out what type of riding I would be doing, they suggested the DEFY model which is cheaper then the TCR. I told them about the Motobecane Ti frame bike I was look at online, and the salesman said it sounded like a good bike, and if I wanted, they could do the assembly for $70. They really do want you to be happy with the bike you buy. It seems like these poeple love cycling more than making money! And they want to get more people into riding.

    As much as I love this Motobecane, the fit issue may be the one thing that holds me back from buying this bike.:confused::(

    Thanks,
    Mike
     
  15. jeepster93

    jeepster93 New Member

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    Mike,

    I'm 5-10. I ride a 58 cm bike. It is a touch big for me. A 58cm bike is truly for someone 6 feet tall. 57cm for a 5-10'er, 56cm for a 5-8 and so on...(rule of thumb starting point).

    My understanding on the fit issue is as you stand over the bike flat footed, the top tube should be like an inch or 2 from touching the jewels. For a road bike.
    The Moto will come with a 10 degree x 130mm handlebar stem(mine did anyhow). This stem is reversible. The object of the reversible 10 degree stem is that the handlebars should be even with or even below the seat. So when you get the stand-over height adjusted, you get your pedaling height set(your knees should be slightly bent at full extension, this is achieved by raising or lowering the seat)you set the stem to this height. This will result in the best aerodynamic position.

    Now, don't forget you are looking at a fairly high end racing bike. This assumes that you will want the aero position.

    You CAN mount the handle bar stem in the plus position and it will give the handlebars a 10 degree rise instead of a drop like I have mine. You can also buy a stem with a shorter tube length and this will also allow a more upright position by bringing the handlebars closer to you. Stems are cheap when considering a multi thousand dollar bike, like $25-100. Don't let that break the deal...a$50 stem on a $1500 bike...no biggie.

    Also, if you do not want the aero position that much, then buy yourself a larger frame than normal. This will in essence, lower the seat and raise the handlebars. But put the top tube closer to your...boys. Do not get such a large bike that every time you stop you rack yourself.
    This is basically what I did. I fit the 56 cm frame better, but got the larger frame so I am not "laying down" as much while riding.
    I totally respect those triathlon riders in the way they lay flat while biking. I CAN"T DO THAT and breath.

    The Motobecane website(MBUSA Road Bicycles) has the dimensions of their bikes on it. Go to The "Lemond System" Frame Sizing Formulas and the FitStik and get a good ballpark on your needs then go to Moto's site and select the bike that best meets those needs.

    This should help a bit.

    I am no expert by the way, just a joe that rides. But wanted a good cycle that was affordable and sweet.
    My Moto is sweet.
     
  16. Mike1jw

    Mike1jw Member

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    I think I'm back to buying the Giant :( I know I'd be getting a lot more for the money, but I feel I need to focus on comfort first. I have a bad back, and I cant afford to buy a bike that's going to result in me not riding at all (it has happened in the past and I dont want it to happen again) I'm sure that although the Giant is less bike for the money, it still will be an ausome bike. Plus, the shop said that they give 20% off any other purchase at the point of purchase of the bike, and I still need a lot clothing and gear. So that wont be too bad.

    I REALLY appreciate all the help though! ! !

    Thanks
    Mike
     
  17. jeepster93

    jeepster93 New Member

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    Mike,

    The single most important thing in purchasing a bike is to want to ride your new bike. The fanciest bike in the world ...not ridden... is useless. A Wally World special ridden every day is a special bike.:love:

    I look forward, every day to my ride. I actually get excited about bikes and riding bikes, as you could probably tell by my posts.


    I hope your new bike lights that same fire in you...:thumbsup:

    Tom
     
  18. Mike1jw

    Mike1jw Member

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    It's true, I'm Nuts!

    I know your going to think I'm crazy, but the more I think about it the more I just cant walk away from this bike! (Motobecane) I think I'm going to do it. What's $2,000 anyway!

    When I got home from work today, about 4:30, I was dying to ride, it was a beautiful day! I did 19mi. in about an hour and 15 minutes and loved every minute of it. I figure, If I can do that with a mountain bike with 26" wheels, how much harder can it by on a road bike, ANY road bike. I'm sure the Giant would be a great bike, but knowing me, everytime I shifted, i'd be looking down and saying to myself "I could have had Ultegra 6700" :mad:

    I think I'm going to go with the 56cm frame though. At first I was thinking about the 59cm, but after standing over my mountain bike and seeing how much clearance I had with it, I dont know if I want only 2" between the top tube and my jewels. :eek: The 56cm should give me about 3.5" clearance. I'm 6'1", and from the best I can measure (with a book spine in my crouch) I have 35 inches to the floor with no shoes on.

    I'll probably order the assembly video and I'm also thinking of getting a bike repair stand. You think it's worth having one, or should I do with out. I am mechanicly inclined so I'm sure it wouldn't hurt, It's just the bucks, or rather, lack of bucks.


    Thanks again for all your help!
    Mike
     
  19. rawhite1969

    rawhite1969 Back in the Saddle

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    I know I'm late to the party here... i purchased a Motobecane Fantom CX from bikesdirect last October. I'm 5'10" 31" inseam. Got a 54 and it fits me fine. Swaped out the stem to get a bit more upright on the front (not ready for that horizontal position) and a good seat. Just put SPD pedals on this week. Logged 750 miles Oct - Feb even with the cold and snow here in IN. Had an issue with the quick release on the back hub (but it was one from a trainer). Otherwise has been a good bike. Assembly was a breeze, and I say that with this being my first bike that used components not found on a bike from Target. Hope you are enjoying riding yours Mike!
     
  20. fleeter

    fleeter The Bearded Wonder

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    While we're resurrecting old threads, I might as well add my .02 on BD bikes...
    I paid my lbs $16 to true up my wheels, I upgraded my saddle, and I had to adjust my handle bars.. after that, I couldn't be happier with the product that I got. Some people are ok with spending three times the money on a name-brand bike, and I would've liked to, but I couldn't justify it because i'm too po :rolleyes: oh well.