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Discussion Starter #1
As a beginner rider, there is a ton of information to know about the sport. Some of it you can learn from a book, some of it you need to learn "on the job." So, what I'd like to know is what are three skill sets you feel would give you more enjoyment from each ride if you learned them?

Is it:
Cornering
Braking
Gearing
Changing Flats
Riding in a group
Climbing
Basic nutrition strategies
Basic equipment/clothing

What would help you have more fun in the saddle?
 

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As a beginner rider, there is a ton of information to know about the sport. Some of it you can learn from a book, some of it you need to learn "on the job." So, what I'd like to know is what are three skill sets you feel would give you more enjoyment from each ride if you learned them?

Is it:
Cornering
Braking
Gearing
Changing Flats
Riding in a group
Climbing
Basic nutrition strategies
Basic equipment/clothing

What would help you have more fun in the saddle?

For me it would be:

1) Basic Nutrition
2) Climbing
3) Gearing
 

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So, what I'd like to know is what are three skill sets you feel would give you more enjoyment from each ride if you learned them?

Is it:
Cornering
Braking
Gearing
Changing Flats
Riding in a group
Climbing
Basic nutrition strategies
Basic equipment/clothing
It would be helpful to have a basic overview of the "Ah ha!" moments for each of the above. Here's what I mean.

I never had my bike fitted for me. When I did, "Ah ha!", the difference in the way my bike feels as I ride it is night and day.

Or similarly, before being fitted, I rode with my toes pointing straight out and my feet flat, as though I were standing on them. After being fitted, I began to point my toes slightly downward. "Ah ha!", the difference in my pedalling is night and day, especially on hills.

Both of those "Ah ha" moments transformed my riding from something I kind of enjoyed to something I delight in. In fact, those experiences are the reason I found and joined the twospoke forum.

So, a distillation of the "Ah ha!" moments for the skill sets you mentioned would be great!

Thanks!

junkergeorge
 

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It would be helpful to have a basic overview of the "Ah ha!" moments for each of the above. Here's what I mean.

I never had my bike fitted for me. When I did, "Ah ha!", the difference in the way my bike feels as I ride it is night and day.

Or similarly, before being fitted, I rode with my toes pointing straight out and my feet flat, as though I were standing on them. After being fitted, I began to point my toes slightly downward. "Ah ha!", the difference in my pedalling is night and day, especially on hills.

Both of those "Ah ha" moments transformed my riding from something I kind of enjoyed to something I delight in. In fact, those experiences are the reason I found and joined the twospoke forum.

So, a distillation of the "Ah ha!" moments for the skill sets you mentioned would be great!

Thanks!

junkergeorge
Good point junker, sometimes, or more likely most of the time, we don't really know what we need!
 

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I guess this is as good a time as any for my first post!

My top three would be:

1. Gearing
2. Group rides
3. Basic nutrition

I've been lurking for a while and cannot tell you how invaluable these forums have been for someone who is discovering the joys of cycling.

Ray
 

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Welcome, Ray!

Being fairly new to biking after many years away, I think there is a lot that I need and would like to learn! But, I think my top three would be:

1. Nutrition...how to prepare before riding and what to do afterwards
2. Bike cleaning and maintenance, including fixing flats and doing those "tweaks" to keep the bike in shape
3. Riding form. I still struggle some with numbness and muscular aches that I think are from both needing to ride more and to ride with better form.
 

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Two skinny J's
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I guess this is as good a time as any for my first post!

My top three would be:

1. Gearing
2. Group rides
3. Basic nutrition

I've been lurking for a while and cannot tell you how invaluable these forums have been for someone who is discovering the joys of cycling.

Ray
Welcome Ray, time for a proper introduction!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
SixtyPlus said:
Welcome, Ray!

Being fairly new to biking after many years away, I think there is a lot that I need and would like to learn! But, I think my top three would be:

1. Nutrition...how to prepare before riding and what to do afterwards
2. Bike cleaning and maintenance, including fixing flats and doing those "tweaks" to keep the bike in shape
3. Riding form. I still struggle some with numbness and muscular aches that I think are from both needing to ride more and to ride with better form.
60+, what kind of pain/numbness? If its in the hands:
Could be bike fit
Could be cervical spine issue, in which case get it checked
Could be lack of low back strength leaving too much pressure on the hands/shoulders
Could be postural

What are you doing off the bike in terms of exercise?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
raybtwo said:
I guess this is as good a time as any for my first post!

My top three would be:

1. Gearing
2. Group rides
3. Basic nutrition

I've been lurking for a while and cannot tell you how invaluable these forums have been for someone who is discovering the joys of cycling.

Ray
Welcome to the peloton Ray!
 

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SixtyPlus said:
Welcome, Ray!

Being fairly new to biking after many years away, I think there is a lot that I need and would like to learn! But, I think my top three would be:

1. Nutrition...how to prepare before riding and what to do afterwards
2. Bike cleaning and maintenance, including fixing flats and doing those "tweaks" to keep the bike in shape
3. Riding form. I still struggle some with numbness and muscular aches that I think are from both needing to ride more and to ride with better form.
I would throw basic bike maintenance on my list too. I have circa 1998 GT Nomad hybrid that I bought new in the late nineties but only rode a little back when I got it. I've successfully changed the tubes thanks to YouTube but I'm having issues with gear jumping on the rear gears. It happens when I'm shifting both to higher and lower gears. Any ideas how to fix this?

Thanks for the warm welcome everyone.

Ray
 

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Two skinny J's
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I would throw basic bike maintenance on my list too. I have circa 1998 GT Nomad hybrid that I bought new in the late nineties but only rode a little back when I got it. I've successfully changed the tubes thanks to YouTube but I'm having issues with gear jumping on the rear gears. It happens when I'm shifting both to higher and lower gears. Any ideas how to fix this?

Thanks for the warm welcome everyone.

Ray[
I would throw basic bike maintenance on my list too. I have circa 1998 GT Nomad hybrid that I bought new in the late nineties but only rode a little back when I got it. I've successfully changed the tubes thanks to YouTube but I'm having issues with gear jumping on the rear gears. It happens when I'm shifting both to higher and lower gears. Any ideas how to fix this?

Thanks for the warm welcome everyone.

Ray
If it is in a particular gear does it skip after you shift?
 

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INTEGRATE said:
As a beginner rider, there is a ton of information to know about the sport. Some of it you can learn from a book, some of it you need to learn "on the job." So, what I'd like to know is what are three skill sets you feel would give you more enjoyment from each ride if you learned them?

Is it:
Cornering
Braking
Gearing
Changing Flats
Riding in a group
Climbing
Basic nutrition strategies
Basic equipment/clothing

What would help you have more fun in the saddle?


Is "ALL THE ABOVE" a answer??? Narrowing it down for me it would be!!

Group riding - drafting, and most importantly unwritten laws of cycling ettiquette!!

Climbing - any strategies that gets me over the hills!!

And any adjustments to keep my bike in good shape and as fast as possible!!
 

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rola643 said:
If it is in a particular gear does it skip after you shift?
Seems to be gears 4, 5 and 6 but those are the gears that I use the most. It's also a little stubborn going from 2 to 3 on the front chain ring.
 

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Mine would be;
Nutrition
Gearing
Basic maintenance and adjustments
Been riding about a year now, ride for health and the joy of it, not a racer but like to improve along the way.
 

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60+, what kind of pain/numbness? If its in the hands:
Could be bike fit
Could be cervical spine issue, in which case get it checked
Could be lack of low back strength leaving too much pressure on the hands/shoulders
Could be postural

What are you doing off the bike in terms of exercise?
Integrate, you are probably hitting the nail on the head, especially with the question of exercise off the bike! Honestly, I am doing very little in that arena. When I first joined TS, I saw several references to core strength and really did not understand the big picture and how that affects cycling. This is probably why there in numbness in the hands. I am also experiencing some in the crotch area and believe that is likely due to a minor seat adjustment that is necessary.

Between a new granddaughter and lots of road time between Mississippi and North Carolina and the oppressive heat, I have not gotten back in the saddle as much as I would like this year. I hope to work on learning how small adjustments might help with both areas.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
If you can find a Retul bike fit in your area, I can't recommend it enough. I would also strongly suggest an eval from a trusted trainer (NASM, CSCS, CHEK or NSCA certified) to see where your posture is.

There are a few simple tests you can do on your own, I can send you something if you'd like.
 

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If you can find a Retul bike fit in your area, I can't recommend it enough. I would also strongly suggest an eval from a trusted trainer (NASM, CSCS, CHEK or NSCA certified) to see where your posture is.

There are a few simple tests you can do on your own, I can send you something if you'd like.
Great! I would appreciate it if you did send me the self-check info.
 
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