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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I reciently got a new Trek Utopia with a flat bar and I want to start riding regularly and at 25+MPH for when I ride around on the road on military bases. I reciently changed my grips from the ones that came with the bike. But I am wondering if I should get either drop down bars and/or bar ends to aid in riding. Can someone tell me what the benifits are for both? Is the reason for the drop bars so you can lower yourself while riding? does it make you go much faster? how about the bar ends? do those make you any faster or do they just assist with hills? and if so, do they a great deal? Should I have both kinds of bars? Is there an attachment that has the bar ends and drop bars in one? It already seems like my handle bar is busy with those chunkier grips, bell, headlight, and gps holder it doesn't seem like I'd have too much room left but I'd be able to side things down a little enough to put bar ends or drop bars on if it will really help. Also, What about tires? This bike came with 700c 38 tires. should i get thinner tires than my stock ones? Will it make me go faster with less effort or something? I can see why you wouldn't want big tred for the road but I dont think there is much tred on my current tires, it seems just like a medium amount like a general purpose tire.
 

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I would avoid drops. Your bike is designed from the ground up (geometry-wise) for upright riding, and drops would take away from the relative comfort. Not sure if you can add bar ends with those sweet grips you got, but I would just ride it for a while and see if there are any shortcomings. Bar ends can help with climbing by opening your chest up and allowing you to breath more, and they also provide alternate hand placement during regular riding. But if it ain't broke, don't fix it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
well i doubt any road bike is all that comfortable anyway, but isn't it mainly about the seat for comfort level? I would think if you're going fast and using drop bars your not doing much sitting anyway so I donno what the issue would be. And what do you mean by geometry? the frames pretty much look the same cept for the thinness. I donno much though i wouldn't think the frame is much of an issue as the other parts such as wheels, handle bars, seats, etc.. when catagorizing a bike as a road or hybrid ect.. I know for racers they get super light weight frames but besides that a lot of them have the same shapes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
say i get some drop bar ends to put on my flat bar, can i get some breaks to put on the drop bars in addition to the ones already on the flatbar so I can break easier and faster if needed? ya know? so i could just use either one...
 

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Back in the Saddle
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your angles are different on the geometry of a road bike vs hybrid. it only takes a few degrees here and there to make a big difference. Seat and head angles are going to be different and are designed to have you more upright on a hybrid. And even on a road bike in the drops you'll be sitting on that saddle. Most riders don't spent a lot of time in the drops anyhow unless they are racing.

Of course, if you are maintaining 25mph over distance on that hybrid maybe you should be racing....
 
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