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Did you read the blgo post? The definition is there. Have you ever tried one? Would you ever try one or are you "judging a book by it's cover"?
Or a third possibility, he was making a joke.
 

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Personally, I like a loosemeat sandwich with tomato paste in it. But that's called a Sloppy Joe.

Long Island Loosemeat used to be a pornstar's nickname ;)
 

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Or a third possibility, he was making a joke.
Jokes seem to not register sometimes.

Yes, I had a mental image of some dude running through Sioux City with willy flying free.
At the same time, I have never in my life heard of a "loose meat" sandwich - and honestly, the name is pretty repulsive and makes it unlikely I would ever try it. Like you, I'll stick with "Sloppy Joe". Gotta have something to hold it all together.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Jokes seem to not register sometimes.

Yes, I had a mental image of some dude running through Sioux City with willy flying free.
At the same time, I have never in my life heard of a "loose meat" sandwich - and honestly, the name is pretty repulsive and makes it unlikely I would ever try it. Like you, I'll stick with "Sloppy Joe". Gotta have something to hold it all together.
As explained in the blog post loose meat is an all encompassing term. They are more commonly called taverns. The very first one ever created was called the Ye Old Tavern Tavern. It was created by a line cook at a restaurant called Ye Old Tavern. Most places in Sioux City call them taverns. Some have specific names for them.

If refered to as a tavern would you try one and not think the name makes it repulsive?

Tell you what, you no doubt have a Dairy Queen in your area. Though the Dairy Queen tavern scored rather low in the taste test, as it is probably the only place in your area that serves taverns give it a try.

Depending on how moist the meat is determines how well it is held together. In the taste test the Dairy Queen Tavern did really well with the moisture of the meat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Sure sloppy joe's have their nich in history. They were created AFTER the tavern was and it is very likely the tavern was the base for the sloppy joe. In other words were it not for the tavern or loose meat sandwich the sloppy joe likely never would have been created.

The reason sloppy joe's were created was to stretch a family's meat supply during WWII as meat was in short supply because of rationing. Later on is when companies started making and canning Sloppy Joe sauce to sell at grocery stores.
 

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I think Taverns/Loose Meat sandwiches are a regional thing. The Dairy Queen's where I am don't sell them. Not every franchise restaurant sells the same food. I remember at Wendy's in North Carolina, you could get a Carolina burger with chili and coleslaw on it, but you couldn't get those elsewhere.

I think Loose Meat is a weird name, and it conjures different images from where I grew up (on the eastern seaboard of the USA), but then again, in Iowa and other midwestern places you play a game called cornhole, and call it family fun. Where I'm from, if I played cornhole with my family, we'd call it incest, and someone would call the cops if I bragged about it.
 

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I think Taverns/Loose Meat sandwiches are a regional thing. The Dairy Queen's where I am don't sell them. Not every franchise restaurant sells the same food. I remember at Wendy's in North Carolina, you could get a Carolina burger with chili and coleslaw on it, but you couldn't get those elsewhere.

I think Loose Meat is a weird name, and it conjures different images from where I grew up (on the eastern seaboard of the USA), but then again, in Iowa and other midwestern places you play a game called cornhole, and call it family fun. Where I'm from, if I played cornhole with my family, we'd call it incest, and someone would call the cops if I bragged about it.
ROFL! Yeah, don't even get me started on that. The first time I saw a "Cornhole Tournament Tonight!" sign here in town, I about sh!+ myself. I had never heard of it, and wasn't sure what to make of it.

The nearest DQ to me is about 40 miles. The one in town burned down many years ago and never returned. I've eaten at a lot of DQs though across the country and I have *never* seen a "loose meat" sandwich that wasn't a sloppy joe. (I can't even type that name without some degree of revulsion!)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I think Taverns/Loose Meat sandwiches are a regional thing.
Tavern sandwiches are not as regional as you think. Here are other places world wide they can be found. In this article: Battle of the loosemeats there is a section called: A tavern by many different names

"Ask a person from a different part of the country about a tavern and you'll be sure to get some curious looks.

That's because a loosemeat sandwich (in the form of a tavern or its saucy cousin, the sloppy joe) is known by many different names across the country.

Here are the names of some of our favorite variations on the old-fashioned tavern:

-- Yip Yips in Southern Illinois, especially around St. Louis

-- Yums Yums in parts of Nebraska

-- Wimpies in Northeastern Pennsylvania and, yes, they were named after Popeye's ravenous pal Wimpie (who's full name happened to be J. Wellington Wimpie, BTW)

-- Slushburgers an unappetizing name popular in the Upper Midwest, particularly North Dakota

-- Sloppy Janes in Central Minnesota

-- Steamers in Virginia, West Virginia and Maryland

-- Dynamites in Northern Rhode Island

-- Juicy Burgers in Eastern Colorado

There are also some international varieties of the All-American loosemeat

-- Rou jia mo, that's what they call 'em in China

-- Savoury Mince Roll, in Australia, sloppy joe ingredients of meat and sauce are poured into the pocket of a pita roll, instead of a more traditional hamburger bun."
As you can see taverns or loose meats can be found all over North America and in other countries along with the close cousin the sloppy joe. So I would not say they are regional.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I've eaten at a lot of DQs though across the country and I have *never* seen a "loose meat" sandwich that wasn't a sloppy joe.
That is because on the Dairy Queen menu it is called a Tavern. If it is available at your local Dairy Queen. I figured you would have picked up on that by now. Guess not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
One additional caveat to this is taverns are or used to be found in Missoula, Montana. There is some speculation they were first created there in 1920 and not in sioux City in 1924. However in Sioux City there is actual documented proof the tavern sandwich was created here.

Legitmate documented proof has yet to be presented to back up the claim the tavern or loose meat was first created in Missoula in 1920. Until such proof is available it is strictly rumor with no basis in fact. And yes inquiries have been made to the Missoula historical groups asking for such proof with no response.

If such legitmate proof is ever presented Sioux City will certainly agree the first loose meat or tavern was not created here and congratulate Missoula on that historical fact.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
If you can't tell Sioux City and the people that live here are proud of our history, which started as far back as 1804, before Iowa was even a state.
 

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This is far more thought than I ever give to food, which surprises some people, since I'm pretty hefty.

There are no "Tavern" sandwiches anywhere around here (Indiana). I used "loose meat" in the same sense that you used the vile term - to describe a genre, not a product. I never heard of one when I lived in Colorado. I never heard of one when I lived in Wyoming. I never heard of one when I lived in California. The closest thing I've seen around here (aside from Sloppy Joes) are Spicy Jamaican Beef (pastries).
 

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Well you went out of your way in the blog to say that Tavern/Loose Meat sandwiches are not made with sauce, and now you're going to include regional and international variations that include sauce, other spices, and other types of breads. I would also say that Sioux City can't lay claim to the sandwiches made in other areas by other names.

Steamers, in areas where I've lived steamers are clams or oysters. And whatever you do, when in Cleveland, don't order a Cleveland Steamer, especially if you're at a place called Dirty Sanchez's.

I'm just saying.
 

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By us, about the only hot food DQ sells is the hot dogs, and I think a pulled pork sandwich.
 
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