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Hey all,

I'm a college guy who rides recreationally most of the time. Unfortunately, I've noticed my weight, strength, and stamina slipping because I haven't had as much time to get to the gym. Long story short, I've tried to start riding a little more and use that as my primary method of getting back in shape.

What do you guys do to get the most out of shorter rides? Like I said, time is kind of a premium and whatever methods you have would certainly help! My buddy does MMA and uses something called an elevation training mask, so I pre-ordered the new version of it on this site (http://www.fundable.com/training-mask). I have high hopes that it will work as advertised. Do you have any experience with products like this?

Thank you!
 

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What do you call a short ride? My normal daily ride is 30 miles, so that is a short ride for me. The best way to improve your overall performance is with more saddle time. Never seen or heard of that mask you linked to.
 

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My short rides during the week have to be completed in an hour due to time restraints. I try to mix in climbs and sprints as much as possible. Find some good, safe and tough routes and ride them as hard as you can.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
At most, I will have 2 hours a day, and that is normally on the weekends. I generally have about an hour I can devote to riding a day, and normally don't get quite 30 miles. (admitted beginner) lol
 

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Interval training will probably give you the best bang for your limited time.
 

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Poolie said:
Interval training will probably give you the best bang for your limited time.
I agree! Unless you include getting ready for the ride in your allotted time frame, you should have no problems doing 15 miles in an hour after getting some good interval training time. However, if you are doing almost 30 miles in that one hour time frame (if I read your post correctly), you're doing a hell of a lot better than most riders I know, including me.
 

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Here's what we use for our training program that knocked off 75 mins from the field test times of 40 people April to June:

Tue: 90 min, :30-5:00 hill repeats.
Thu: roller to flat 3-5:00 intervals
*Both days need to be done at VO2max and anaerobic threshold pace for them to work.

Sat/Sun: 20-30 min hill repeats x 3-4 just below threshold.

You can sustain this for about 12-14 weeks until you need to back off the gas pedal for 7-10 days before doing it again.

In the gym, assuming your moving correctly and getting proper muscle function, talk to a trainer you trust about metabolic circuits. Think interval training with weights.

Do that, and your fitness levels will get a lot higher a lot faster.
 

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Also, throw out miles and ride for time. it's more effective and you won't stay out for junk miles after you fatigue that don't do any good.

The miles will come once you start to get more fit.
 

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Also, throw out miles and ride for time. it's more effective and you won't stay out for junk miles after you fatigue that don't do any good.

The miles will come once you start to get more fit.
with this are you meaning- set out an hour and ride as hard or far etc in that hour? or??
 

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I don't always have the time to ride as well so if I have only a half hour or 45 minutes, I do intervals. Up and down a hill.
 

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No, program a workout, and do those intervals/repeats in the time allotted. I would highly recommend the Time Crunched Cyclist by Chris Carmichael. It is perfect for what you need.
 

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Also, throw out miles and ride for time. it's more effective and you won't stay out for junk miles after you fatigue that don't do any good.

The miles will come once you start to get more fit.
How would apply this to riding a century for example? I'm not sure at what point you reach junk miles.

I tend to hit the same mileag for a given time consistently but I'm guessing you are referring solely to someone traing for a specific target, event or race?
 

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This is the strategy we do use for our century riders. Intensity is the most common factor most century riders omit from their event prep.

Our goal is to overbuild the engine so that the moderate pace of a century becomes much easier. We also only have them ride 60 miles at the most to insure they get no where near junk miles, and it has worked like a charm.

You don't have ride anywhere near 100 miles of you train correctly!
 

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This is the strategy we do use for our century riders. Intensity is the most common factor most century riders omit from their event prep.

Our goal is to overbuild the engine so that the moderate pace of a century becomes much easier. We also only have them ride 60 miles at the most to insure they get no where near junk miles, and it has worked like a charm.

You don't have ride anywhere near 100 miles of you train correctly!
Cool! As a general rule i don't ever do much more than 60ish. I just wanted to make sure I was following what you were saying.
 

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You're spot on!
 
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