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Discussion Starter #1
First I am old guy and a beginner road bike rider. Often I see very light bikes zoom by me. It makes me wonder would a lighter bike be easier to pedal or would loosing 5 lbs have the same effect as buying a lighter bike?

thx
Red
 

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Two skinny J's
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First, a nice welcome to the forum !

So how old is old? It would help to know what kind of riding you are interested in. Remember you can own a fast bike and if the engine ain't worth a dang it doesn't matter how good the bike is :)

This should draw some interesting debate. How much money do you want to spend to be light, how hard are you willing to work to loose some weight? I will just say that loosing body weight is cheap and the lighter you are the better. It's a lot harder pulling around 200 pounds than say 155 up and down hills. Not that it can't be done but ya know what I'm saying.

Nothing like a good solid bike under you for how and what you want to ride.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi, am 57 and ride an adopted Giant ocr3 and an adopted Trek Series 3

I started by riding a mountain bike to and from work for a couple weeks as often as I could. One mile each way.

Have been on 3 road bike rides so far. First I went to my local path and rode as far as I thought I could, 12 miles. Suprised the hell out of me. Second, was sure I would never make it, a 16.2 mile group ride. Third was another group ride 2 days later, last Monday, which was 22 miles. Suprised as heck I completed both and was way up in the pack. Has gotten super hot here so am worried about the heat but I realy want to ride. So I may try a ride after dinner one night.
 

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The guys on lightweight bike who pass you have probably ridden more than three times. If you want a bike that's easier to pedal, downshift! :) It sounds like you're making progress. Keep up the good work! If you like how your bike rides, keep riding it. If you want one that rides better, go for it, but the OCR3 if tuned up and in good condition should serve you well.

A nicer bike might go faster. It's hard for someone else to tell you when to upgrade. If you think you might want to buy a new bike, test ride some.

A lot of recreational riders pour money into their bikes so they will go faster. I don't really understand why they do that. Perhaps they think going faster means their fitness is improving, but sometimes it only means the bike is improving.
 

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Welcome Redman!

Keep riding! It's the engine that makes the bike go fast. The OCR3 should serve you will while you're building your cardio and leg strength.
 

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Welome aboard.

With only three rides under your belt I would suggest you stick with the bikes you already have. If you continue to ride on a consistant basis you will naturally begin to go faster as you refine your riding technique and build your fitness level.

There is no magic component or group set that will do this for you. Early on many people dive in head first into the deep end of the cycling pool only to find out they dont have the stick to itness for the activity. There are many lonely bicycles out there collecting dust needlessly as you are aware of the orphans you have already adopted.

My advice would be to enjoy the bikes you have and if the addiction becomes great enough to warrant spending your money on a lighter bike in the future take the plunge.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Great advice everyone. Yes I plan to keep riding. I did upgrade my pedals. Am riding my MTN tonfrom work and the ocr on trails after work 2 days a week and have always loved bikes.
 

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redman, I would agree with hack and the others - keep what you have and concentrate on taking the weight off the saddle rather than the bike for now. Losing bike weight will do nothing for your drive to do better, but a few pounds off the rider would surely make you feel better about the bike and yourself.
 

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Yesterday tired old man, Today retired old man
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At 57 I might be rideing my Fuji Absolute 1.0 more at 19#. But at 67 I like my steel 38# Jamis Aurora elite. The Fuji is fast But the Jamis is comfy. The Fuji has 3,600 miles on it and the Jamis has 6,100 miles, bouth have bin ridden, the weight is with tools and pump and 2 watter bottles full, I am 230 # The Fuji is just a slite bit faster.
 

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Welcome to the two wheeled tribe, its an awesome ride!
 

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Industry_Hack said:
....weight off the rider will allow for better gains than weight off the bike.
Welcome Redman.
From what I've read, I agree with Industry_Hack.
Think about keeping the current bikes for a year or so and building your cardio & legs. Tone in the saddle and reading & asking questions here will also give you time to consider what type of riding and therefor what type of bike you may want to grow into.
I hope you stick around and keep us appraised of your successes.
Again, Welcome to the gang.
 

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A lighter bike is easier to hang on the wall when you get home.:)
 

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First, hats off to you and welcome to the group.

I agree with what the others have said, a more efficient engine will improve power/weight ratio.

You mention the heat, I cannot stress enough the importance of proper hydration! We have a forum here for health and fitness, you may want to take a look there and post any questions you may have. As much as riding a bike is fun, I feel there is a risk/benefit that needs to be weighed before putting your health in danger.
 
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