Two Spoke Forums banner

1 - 20 of 155 Posts

·
Eocyclist
Joined
·
742 Posts
Thirty years ago my wife and I used to camp frequently in the the national forests and national parks in Colorado and Wyoming. A site close to a stream was always nice.

These days we make bike trips that last 1 to 2 weeks, but prefer to "camp" closer to the jacuzzi.

BTW, your web site looks very interesting. How is the bike tour business going?
 

·
The Wizard of Odd
Joined
·
91 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
:D …wellllll … really while touring sometime I also would like to be closer to jacuzzi, but stay away. The camp in the wilderness keeps me in a nice “wild” form.
I really love to deal with my Home site – it brings me a great pleasure, especially in these autumn days, when the summer has remained away behind me – in the moment I put several more pics in it. What about the tour business, I would say, most of all it is a game for me I love it so much, it helped me in the years to be together with my children summer time … it seems people toured with us liked it too, because more of them are coming one more time to tour together.
Down is one of the camp places (again near a small river) - it was 12 day bike tour I and my daughter Maya did August ‘10
 

Attachments

·
The Wizard of Odd
Joined
·
91 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
:thumbsup:
The wife and I camped before having the kid. We are going to wait till he gets a little older before we attempt to get him out there.
My experience shows, that children are ready for a long tour when they are at least 14. It was the age I have begun to do it of first with my son, after with my daughter. Always when she has a free time, she still comes and tours with me … I believe, nothing better for the children …
 

·
Rat Biker
Joined
·
442 Posts
Hopefully with a little luck I will be able to finally go camping myself with my bike. It's the main thing I am setting my old ride up for but for me will be a solo run only. Now with my girlfriend I am planning to get a motorcycle and go camping with her on that she's not so much a cycler like me. But that's ok.
 

·
Rat Biker
Joined
·
442 Posts
I've been looking into constructing a touring bike. 14 you say Bob? I wanted to go before that!


Yeah that'd a dream of mine to I'd love to braze up my own frame someday but as of right now a pipe dream.


Hey Dean are you gonna build your own frame or buy one already done up?
 

·
The Wizard of Odd
Joined
·
91 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
I've been looking into constructing a touring bike. 14 you say Bob? I wanted to go before that!
Yes Dean …. A little earlier, why not (have in mind, we toured only in the wilderness away from the civilization) … I have begun with my son he was 13 – we began climbing 8 – 10 kilometers each week (we are not sportiest). After several months he understood what he has to do and I saw – he is ready for tour long time. Our first tour he was 14 included 1200 km for 12 days, first several days we bicycled 130 km daily. Almost the same was with my daughter – only the daily distance was 80 kilometers. Now my son does not bicycling, but daughter … always when it is possible …
 

Attachments

·
Completely Human
Joined
·
177 Posts
I love to camp in the wilderness when touring. I often find that I have no choice as I seem to always meander off of my planned route to see sites or simply because of a wrong turn.
I tend to find spots that are out of the way but close to main thoroughfares. I must admit that I too have become fond of being close to forms of water, but more of the "Jaccuzzi" types the older I get.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,350 Posts
I've got tons of info on camping gear, and even some stuff to test. One company I spoke with has a package that includes a backpack, tent, sleeping bag and pad, weighing in at around 12 pounds. With a little luck, I could convince my wife to do a hike and bike one weekend in the mountains above Sundance.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
7 Posts
With a Camping Trailer that we Design of Course!!!

Glad you posted this.......:thumbsup:

Our company has produced many custom made trailers that are incredibly efficient in carrying a good sized load over a great distance. We have a custom design for a Camping/Touring Trailer that will be available to any cyclist in the US and Canada for really getting a good night's rest while being out there for days.

Our Tourmaster Camping Trailer is designed to track behind any bike, connected to the seatpost, and offers more freedom of movement and more stability in downhill and turning situations, than any other trailer featuring a side attachment, and will unfold to create a 30"x72" platform, that a special made tent cover that fits over, providing a dry and elevated camp for any condition or terrain.

The trailer in collapsed form will be able to carry a huge load of equipment and gear if traveling for professional reasons, and can be used as an approach vehicle for many expeditions and touring activities as well, making our Tourmaster Camping Trailer the most versatile choice for an adventurer and outdoorsman.

Check out our Work Bike Fabrication page and give us a call at 802-366-0712.
www.pedalpowerbiketaxi.com (under Work Bike Fabrication Link)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
7 Posts
Heavy loads and a seat post mount sound questionable. Any caveats?
How does 250 lbs sound to you???? We make Bike Taxis that are rated to over 1000lbs....so maybe the "Standard" you work by is all you have seen???

I would take a look at our website and then try to reconsider our proven products already in use.........don't knock us till you try us!!!

We recommend that the seat post is reinforced with a solid aluminum rod if you are concerned.....but much safer than any Burly side attachment for sure, and will help to keep the bike standing with ease with it's central positioning.......we have pioneered this method for years.

Scary designs have prompted our company to introduce the first rigid kids trailer as well, that features an interchangeable car seat that is made by Simpson Racing. Roll cage engineering and superior products in a trailer that won't kill your kid if hit by a car, like the flimsy hollow tubed, plastic component imitations of real engineering that we have seen being mass marketed lately.......you should be "Hack"ing them...not us!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,350 Posts
I don't see anything on your site about your trailer, and certainly nothing about testing a load of 250 pounds on a seatpost. That's a lot of stress in an area that most frames are not designed for.
 

·
Eocyclist
Joined
·
742 Posts
In the early 1970's, the very first product sold by the Cannondale company was a seatpost mounted, two wheeled trailer called the Bugger. It was a light Aluminium frame with 27in wheels. The 'container' section came in various configurations, e.g. as a kid seat, a golf bag carrier, or a bag for touring / utility hauling.

IIRC, the touring / utility bag was designed to haul about 65lbs, but I'm sure I exceeded that weight by a little when hauling two kids back there.

For touring, it suffered from the same problem as all two wheeled trailers. If you got too close to the edge of the road, one of the wheels would drop off onto the gravel creating a control problem.

The seat mount felt unstable to me when slowing, as if the trailer was trying to pass me up whenever I applied the brakes while carrying speed. I could picture it jackknifing while slowing on a downhill, and especially a downhill curve. My recollection is that the feeling with the seat mount was much more pronounced than with a skewer mounted trailer like Burly or BOB. The unstable feeling was probably due to the seat mount being higher than the skewer mount, and the distance between the attachment point and the wheels being longer.
 

Attachments

·
Eocyclist
Joined
·
742 Posts
I would take a look at our website and then try to reconsider our proven products already in use.........don't knock us till you try us!!!
PedalPower, you certainly have some nice designs for utility and commercial trailers. But you might want to study the market a little more before spending a bundle developing a trailer for cycle tourists.

Cycle tourists, like back packers, are weight weenies. Some cut the tags out of their underwear to save weight ... and if they bring a paperback book, they tear out the pages as they read them. Most cycle tourists can ride cross country and camp in relative luxury with under 50 lbs of stuff, counting racks and panniers.

Edit - added for reference: My tent sleeps two and weighs in at 4 lbs 8 oz. I would have a hard time justifying a trailer weighing more than a 13 lb BOB or a 14 lb Burley
 
1 - 20 of 155 Posts
Top