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Yes speeding is speeding no matter what the vehicle,and you will get a ticket if caught. Just like a dui can be given while on a bike also
 

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Of course here in FL any moving violation that you can get in a car you can get on a bike. I was just bringing up an old amusing incident. Many of the times, in my town, when they ticket you the ticket is a civil disobedience. A least that's what they were handing out at stop signs. Fines were half of car fine and no points. The cop would have to be a real prick to ticket you for speeding, unless you were doing something dangerous, like weaving in and out of kids.
 

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DX's Biggest Member
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Never GOT one, but if I did, I'd run a copy of it and FRAME it!

The only time I came close was back in '74; at the bottom of a looong hill, I hit 56mph coming onto the state highway, Limit 55.

The bike was FUN before then; afterward, it was ADDICTIVE.
 

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Never GOT one, but if I did, I'd run a copy of it and FRAME it!

The only time I came close was back in '74; at the bottom of a looong hill, I hit 56mph coming onto the state highway, Limit 55.

The bike was FUN before then; afterward, it was ADDICTIVE.
That was my top speed on my Trek 1200. Of course, I nearly soiled my shorts, as it was on a steep hill with a 35MPH curve.
 

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I have gotten a speeding ticket before. The cop was being a complete jerk about it too. Most states you cannot get a DUI. A bike is not a motorized vehicle. You will most likely get a public intox.
 

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Deranged Touring Cyclist
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Heard on the news that a cyclist got caught speeding in a school zone and I was wondering if that is a law
This topic deserves a bump. Good question, Garetht!

In most states, bicycles are considered the legal equivalent of a car or motorcycle. That means you most certainly CAN get a speeding ticket on a bicycle, and in every state I know of (not all), you can also get a DUI on one. In Arizona, you can even get a DUI on a horse! I've seen reports of it happening. Just like bikes, horses can also be considered 'motor vehicles' under the law. That the motor is sometimes mechanical and other times biological is unimportant.

Here in CO, I have seen police officers patrolling the local MUP - once in a car (?!?!) - yes, marked police car driving along the MUP - once an officer on a bike with a radar gun. He stopped nearby while I was helping some ladies with a flat and clocked every cyclist who passed during the time it took to get the flat taken care of. He didn't nail anyone while I was watching, but it wasn't for lack of trying. I was very careful about my speed while cycling away...some silly reason or another ;)

Your only immunity to tickets when you're on a bike is the cop not thinking it's worth the effort to pull you over and give you one. Legally, you're just as subject to being awarded for the quality of your cycling as you are to getting a similar award for the quality of your driving when behind the wheel or a car or other, more 'traditional' vehicle.

If cyclists are to be allowed on the road with cars, that's kind the way things have to be. We, as cyclists, aren't looking for special rights, only the same right to use the roads in going about our lawful pursuits as everyone else. That, of necessity, means the possibility of being ticketed for illegal behavior. It doesn't happen all that often, but don't mistake the authorities' lack of caring for legal immunity.
 

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The Back Row
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I don't know but me and a cycling buddy were riding last weekend and we actually tripped one of those speed limit detection signs. Clocked us at 26mph. I was surprised it was able to read our speed, given how small we are in relation to a car.
 

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Eocyclist
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This topic deserves a bump. Good question, Garetht!

In most states, bicycles are considered the legal equivalent of a car or motorcycle. That means you most certainly CAN get a speeding ticket on a bicycle, and in every state I know of (not all), you can also get a DUI on one. In Arizona, you can even get a DUI on a horse! I've seen reports of it happening. Just like bikes, horses can also be considered 'motor vehicles' under the law. That the motor is sometimes mechanical and other times biological is unimportant.

Here in CO, I have seen police officers patrolling the local MUP - once in a car (?!?!) - yes, marked police car driving along the MUP - once an officer on a bike with a radar gun. He stopped nearby while I was helping some ladies with a flat and clocked every cyclist who passed during the time it took to get the flat taken care of. He didn't nail anyone while I was watching, but it wasn't for lack of trying. I was very careful about my speed while cycling away...some silly reason or another ;)

Your only immunity to tickets when you're on a bike is the cop not thinking it's worth the effort to pull you over and give you one. Legally, you're just as subject to being awarded for the quality of your cycling as you are to getting a similar award for the quality of your driving when behind the wheel or a car or other, more 'traditional' vehicle.

If cyclists are to be allowed on the road with cars, that's kind the way things have to be. We, as cyclists, aren't looking for special rights, only the same right to use the roads in going about our lawful pursuits as everyone else. That, of necessity, means the possibility of being ticketed for illegal behavior. It doesn't happen all that often, but don't mistake the authorities' lack of caring for legal immunity.
+1000 on the necessity of same rules same rights.

A cyclist on the road, has the same rights ans duties as the driver of a motor vehicle.

About tickets for a bicycling while under the influence: I recently had a conversation about cyclist DUI with a lawyer who specializes in bicycling cases in Illinois. In many states, but not all, the DUI statute is written to apply only to drivers of motor vehicles. So there is an ambiguity in the law about DUI and cyclists. So DUI might not apply in some places. But tipsey cyclists are not off the hook. A drunk cyclist can certainly be arrested under other statutes, such as public intoxication.
 

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There's a local civil war park here that has a steep road to the top of a hill that cyclists like to use for hill repeats. The posted speed limit is 25mph and has a sign directly below it that says 'This applies to cyclist as well' or something like that. I've talked to several people that have received speeding tickets there.
 
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