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Be careful with those high lifted bike racks like the Saris shown or roof racks. Reason for the warning is that there has been plenty of riders who forgot their bikes were that high and hit garage doors, other low hanging objects like tree branches, those hanging pipes designed to keep big trucks out of certain driveways, low hanging awnings, etc, and destroyed bikes.
 

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And it can get worse. I witnessed a van with a couple of bikes on top drive under an object. It not only destroyed the bikes and rack, but messed up the roof of the van as well.

I wouldn't want to worry about my bike being up there, so a roof rack would be my last option.
 

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Thule makes a very good tray style receiver hitch carrier. They took over the market in tray style carriers when Sport Works went to making the carriers for public transportation vehicles only. My carrier is a Sport Works. When Thule took over they have stuck with the same great quality and durability that the Sport Works brand offered. Last I checked Thule makes them for both 1 1/4" and 2" receivers. You can get a receiver hitch put on pretty much any motor vehicle on the road today.

I would NEVER put my bike on a roof rack of any kind for the exact reasons listed in this thread and then some.
 

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I hear you!! In the beginning I was skeptical of my bikes on the roof. But like clip-less pedals, after a while it just becomes second nature, I've had no problems, and would consider myself a complete and utter muppet, should I drive into the garage or access area with limited roof space, to so much as damage my bikes or the roof of my car for that matter.

Come on guys?
 

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I don't want to know who you use, as long as they're not complete muppets. Sorry, I'm a big Lock, Stock and Snatch fan, so I chuckled when I saw your post.

Anyway, I had two friends destroy two bikes within weeks of each other this summer. Here's a picture of one of them.



I had to have him take my bike to his house last Friday so I could transport a refrigerator in my truck. It made me nervous given that was actually the second time he had forgotten his bike was on his rack and drove into something. He got lucky the first. So, I made sure and put a note on his steering wheel reminding him not to destroy mine.
 

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I hear you!! In the beginning I was skeptical of my bikes on the roof. But like clip-less pedals, after a while it just becomes second nature, I've had no problems, and would consider myself a complete and utter muppet, should I drive into the garage or access area with limited roof space, to so much as damage my bikes or the roof of my car for that matter.

Come on guys?
Really? There's been guys that have flown helicopters for many years and by force of habit would always duck exiting the chopper as not to get their heads cut off...but every once in awhile a seasoned chopper pilot forgets.....
 

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Really? There's been guys that have flown helicopters for many years and by force of habit would always duck exiting the chopper as not to get their heads cut off...but every once in awhile a seasoned chopper pilot forgets.....
Same goes for fixed wing. They say the most dangerous time is between 500-700 hours. Below that you're too scared to do something stupid so you check and re-check everything. Above that you've either done something stupid, or seen someone do something stupid so you check and re-check everything.

Case in point, a guy at my airport had about 570 hours, and a retractable landing gear airplane (see where this is going?) You guessed it, he ignored the gear warning horn all the way until he heard this weird scraping noise.

Moral of the story, when you say "Meh, I'm passed that stage." The smart thing to do is think about what you just said.
 

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You fly Dubgurl? Former CFII MEI and high timers can be just as dangerous and in many ways are worse. They can get complacent. To them its old hat. They have been there, done that and sometimes dealt with the failure without breaking anything. They have seen their share of failures and that no longer even makes them bat an eye. One day I was riding in a Baron a friend of mine with 500 hours in Barons (not tt) reached over and grabbed the gear handle and put it down. The handle however caught in a spot that it moved, but didn't go all the way down, so the gear didn't move. The evil instructor in me just waited a second to see if he was going to check it again and when he didn't, I just asked, "Why is the gear up light still on?" Shocked he admitted that had I not been there he would have been a member of the gear up club. He was no rookie by any stretch.

New be's tend to make mistakes from lack of knowledge or experience. They will make a mistake because of what they don't know or do. Often a mistake they make will be compounded because they don't know how to deal with it.

I think the same thing applies to cycling, though to a lessor extent. Newbees are likely to go over learning clipless pedals, but anyone can get right crossed. The newbee and the vet might get caught up in a right cross for very different reasons. The newbee might not know how to or be good at a max performance stop, and the vet might be a bit complacent and caught off guard. Its also possible that both are just in the wrong place at the wrong time and nothing either could have done.

Moral of my story is you either control the risks, or the risks control you.
 
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