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I am having carpal tunnel surgery in a couple weeks. Have any of the Two Spoke members gone through this surgery? What was the recovery time? The Doctor told me the time off of the bike is limited to my comfort level on the bike. How long did it take you to get back on? :confused:
 

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Well never had the surgery but I did have carpal tunnel for a short time years ago. It wasn't fun and from my experience the type of bike you ride might have as much to do with how long as your pain tolerance. IF you are riding upright or on a bent, the amount of stress on the wrist and hands is minimal if any. Riding a cruiser is going to be a lot easier than riding a road or mountain bike where some weight of the body winds up on your hands. The other thing you might run into is the strength in the grip to work the brake levers and shift. A twist grip shift is likely to be really painful. Others I would expect to be no problem. Just make sure you follow their instructions to the letter. They are not talking for their health., and most are not politicians just talking to hear themselves talk.
 

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I've had it done. I was back on the bike within a week and a half or so. My issue wasn't so much the pressure on my hand as I ride a recumbent. But squeezing the brake lever hard enough to safely stop and using the rapid fire thumb shifters.

One other thing if you are just going to have a local anesthetic to your hand rather than general anesthetic where you are all the way under expect some discomfort. Not all of the nerves are numbed. You will not feel anything directly from the surgery itself, as long as the anesthesiologist does his job right. What you will feel when they inject your hand is the feeling of a really bad bee sting, especially when they stick the needle into the tip of your middle finger. After the surgery, when they rinse the incision site before they close it you will feel something similar to what it feels like when you bump your :funny bone" on your elbow, only it will be from your hand and wrist. Like I said not all of the nerves are numbed. When they rinsed the incision site on mine it felt pretty intense for a bit.

How did your test feel to determine that you have carpal tunnel? I'm talking about the one where they jamb a needle in multiple places in your arm and hand. After mine was done I wanted to punch the SOB who did it. He kept missing the nerve and rather than remove the needle and re stick me, which I would have preferred the prick would move and grind the needle around until he found the nerve. I was laying on a bed with my right arm straight out when this test was done. I told him more than once to stop, it hurts, and pull the damn needle out and re stick me if he has to. He would not, by the time he got to my hand I had formed a fist with my left hand hand was going to come across my body swinging it toward him. He saw this just as he finished. He pretty much ran out of the room, cause he knew I was in pain and pissed at him. I found out later he was not supposed to have done the test that way and he should have remove the needle and re stick me with it. That takes longer, the reason he was grinding and moving the needle around in my arm, instead of doing it properly was to save time. I also found out if a patient requests a doctor to stop the doctor is supposed to comply in a situation like this. He more or less violated my patient rights.

I got him back by going after his reputation. I found others who had dealings with him who he had also hurt. Some were filing malpractice suits against him and all of us had file complaints against him. We all went after his reputation online. I've no doubt he got what was due for what he had done to patients. I did check and had no grounds for a mal practice suit as he did not cause me serious injury as he had others. Thankfully the idiot who did the test was not the same one who did my surgery. Who knows what would have happened if that were the case. I'd have probably lost my hand or had permanent damage done to it.

Contrary to what photosbymark says not all doctors know what they are doing, nor are all of them good doctors.
 

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I had the surgery done a long long time ago and the hand was like brand new, no pain or anything in the hand wrist or arm. I don't rember how long to recover but I don't think it was long, or I would have remberd. I just rember I could not belive how good it was afterwords.
 

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I had a bilateral carpal release (both hands at the same time) in 1992. It was so bad, I was dropping tools cause my hands were getting numb (not something you want to do while working on the tail of a jet........), both arms would go numb from the shoulders down at night, pain. I was back at work in 2 weeks, albeit limited duty. Had hard half casts for the weekend, those got taken off and soft casts for a short time. Back then, physical therapy was done and did it for several weeks. To this day, I have no problems.

Wife had one done about 5 years ago. Her down time was way shorter than mine, with no PT. Her wrist is doing fine.

The biggest key is to move the fingers as soon as surgery is done and you are home and when able to, move the wrist (carefully though).

You will hear horror stories about the surgery (my MIL was one), but I am convinced a lot are due to the patient not doing the movements and exercises that the doctor requires (case of the MIL and some others) (not saying that there aren't any quacks out there that should not do it). On both my wife and my wrists, you have to look hard to see the scars.

As far as time till you can ride, not sure as I was not riding a bunch, but seem to remember about a month and a half. I had one of the original Profile Airstryke aerobars at the time, but they were pointed more up than they should have, but I did that because I needed them to ride without my hands going numb, did not use them for streamlining my posture. From experience, riding with the wrist braces is a pain in the arse, but very doable.

The test I had did not involve needles, but rather electrical stimulus from the shoulder down to the hand. Felt weird seeing my arm jump without my input, but no pan involved......................................The doc was basically measuring resistance to the current to see where the problem was, and it was right at the carpal tunnel.. As far as the surgery, I did a local. Did not feel anything. I had a very good doctor, as did my wife.
 

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Had my wrists done a while ago, and they have new procedures they use now days. But back in '87 and '89, I was out of commission for 4 weeks on the first one, 7 weeks the second one.
But funny thing, with both I could fish within a week, just couldn't work.
Never any problems after having them done.
 
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