Two Spoke Forums banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The pedal is one of the parts we touch the most. Long-term pedaling will inevitably cause wear and tear over time. Therefore, when riding long distances, changing the pedals also happens from time to time.

Relatively speaking, the method of replacing the pedals is much simpler. It should be noted that the two pedal threads of the bicycles we ride are different, the left one is the reverse buckle, and the right one is the positive buckle. Therefore, you should pay attention to the direction of rotation when disassembling and assembling, and also pay attention not to use too much force, so as not to hurt your hands, and when installing, the screws must be tightened.
 

·
Spin Spin Spin
Joined
·
4,289 Posts
It's as easy as left and right.....use a 15mm open end wrench, an allen if they are so endowed on their backside, turn in direction of desired result. don't scratch your crank arms with the wrench. Seems the wrong one on the wrong side just doesn't thread correctly. put the right one on the right side.....then the left on other side.
 

·
Deranged Touring Cyclist
Joined
·
5,771 Posts
I once started having foot pain during and after every ride. Quickly determined that the problem was my pedals: the bearings were failing, resulting in a slanted pedal and foot pain. A new set resolved the problem easily.
 

·
Deranged Touring Cyclist
Joined
·
5,771 Posts
so the shoes weren't a factor?
At other times, shoes have been a factor. In this case, I'd simply failed to notice that my pedals' bearings were badly worn. So badly that the pedal platforms sagged a few degrees on each side. They also exhibited a lot of play when grabbed and shaken. I'm frankly embarrassed that I let them get so bad, but until the foot pain began, I had no reason to suspect I had any trouble. This is why older, wiser cyclists tend to run on and on about maintenance and its importance :D.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top