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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I hope someone can help me with this one! I just bought a chain wear gauge to keep track of my chain on my new bike. I followed the instuctions, and the gauge goes all the way to the Max wear point. Could this be possible? I have about 120 mi on the bike so far. Needless to say, I'll be calling the bike shop tomorrow. Any opinions would be helpful before I do. Please check out the pics.
 

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I hope someone can help me with this one! I just bought a chain wear gauge to keep track of my chain on my new bike. I followed the instuctions, and the gauge goes all the way to the Max wear point. Could this be possible? I have about 120 mi on the bike so far. Needless to say, I'll be calling the bike shop tomorrow. Any opinions would be helpful before I do. Please check out the pics.
Very unlikely that your chain is worn out. More likely that your chain checker is wrong. One easy way to check your chain without a special tool is to measure a 12" section of chain with a ruler. The pins are 1/2" on center. If the last pin is 1/8" or more beyond the 12" mark, the chain is no good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
measure a 12" section of chain with a ruler. The pins are 1/2" on center. If the last pin is 1/8" or more beyond the 12" mark, the chain is no good.
Thanks for the tip!

Question. Is it best to change the chain before it reaches the 1/8" over, or is 1/8" over the change point?

From what I'm learning, if you replace the chain before it's worn too much, you wont have to change the cassette and chain rings as much. Is that true?
 

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Thanks for the tip!

Question. Is it best to change the chain before it reaches the 1/8" over, or is 1/8" over the change point?

From what I'm learning, if you replace the chain before it's worn too much, you wont have to change the cassette and chain rings as much. Is that true?
I tend to let my chain get excessively worn out before changing it which is not good. I ride mostly singlespeeds which accelerate chain wear, so sometimes it gets worn out before I realize it. Since I use a stainless steel chainring and a very heavy duty freewheel, I can go through several chains before needing to replace either.

For shifty bikes with a cassette and a full compliment of chainrings, it's best to replace the cassette with the chain and at least inspect and replace chainrings as needed. In most cases, the middle ring will show the most wear since it is used the most. Here on the East coast, the big ring can take a lot of abuse too, but more so from rocks than normal wear and tear. The granny isn't ramped, so the gear teeth are thicker making it last longer.

It's best to replace your chain when it gets close to 1/8" over, especially on a geared bike.
 

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It's probably a good idea to change the chain early and save wear on the cassette and money in the longer term. If the new chain jumps then your cassette needs changing as well, but you won't need to do that so often if you've changed the chain frequently.

And the middle chainring is most likely to be worn, as hophead says. Again, if the new chain sits ok, you've got some more miles left in the chainring, too. At least you can change one ring at a time.
 
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