Two Spoke Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Blogger, Athlete
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Riding a bike through nature is one of the most pleasant things a human can experience. But if our bicycles are screeching on every revolution of the cranks or squeeze of the brakes, the solitude of the outdoors can quickly vanish.

Here are some areas on your bicycle that may be the source of your headaches as well as how to fix them:

Pedals and Cleats – Try greasing your cleats and tightening the pedals. If it sounds more like a pop noise, your bearings are worn out and need replacing.

Spokes and Valve Stems – Loose spokes can rub up against each other when pressure is applied to the wheel’s rim. The best way to fix this is to do a total over-hall on your wheels: grease the nipples, clean the spokes, and true your wheels. The noise could also be coming from a valve stem brushing against a part of the fork during each revolution. If you think this is the case, reposition your innertube so the valve is pointing straight towards the hub and then wrap it with electrical tape so it doesn’t shift positions.

Bottom Bracket – If the bracket screws and/or chainring bolts are loose, there will be a clicking sound every revolution. Since the exact source of the noise can be hard to locate, remove the cranks and feel if the bracket axle turns easy. If all seems good, remove the bottom bracket and clean and re-grease the threads.

Headset – This is more a feeling than a noise. You’re most likely to notice this upon when braking your handlebars start to vibrate. Other than cleaning, re-greasing the bearings, and tightening the whole assembly, I’ve found it hard to fix this problem myself. Most often this is caused by a poor fit from the head-tube surface being uneven. If this is the case, take your bicycle to the shop.

Hubs – (FRONT) Check to make sure your wheels don’t move side-to-side and that the bearings are clean. (BACK) Make sure the cassette isn’t loose and the bearings are in good shape.

Brake Pads – Sometimes pads develop wear unevenly causing more pressure to be applied on one side of the rim than the other. Or if you bike off-road, your wheels could be out of true causing a pulsing sensation when stopping. Readjust your brake cantilevers and pads as well as making sure your wheel isn’t installed crooked. The next step would be to have a mechanic check out your wheels if nothing works.

Front Derailleur – Bent chainring or front derailleur out of position.

Cassette – In the lowest gear, the chain can rub up against the chain protector between the spokes and cassette. Just replace the protector or remove it entirely.

Chain – Oftentimes a pair of links can become tight after resealing a chain. This is normally your culprit when the noise appears only every 3 or 4 revolutions of the pedals. Work the stiffened section back-and-forth in a “Z” pattern and then apply some chain lube.

Kyle Beck
Blogger, Athlete
passionispain.com
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,414 Posts
I'll respectfully disagree on one point. If your chain is rubbing your spokes or the pie plate, there's an adjustment that needs to be done on your chain throw. If you're rubbing the disc and you remove, what happens? BINGO! The chain gets thrown into the spokes. Better to have everything adjusted properly rather than removing parts.....
 

·
Two skinny J's
Joined
·
21,193 Posts
rubbing your spokes or the pie plate, there's an adjustment that needs to be done on your chain throw.
And all this time I thought it was a Dork Disk :eek:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,223 Posts
Only the jinx, I mean Rola, could break a dork disk. ;-) BTW has anything broken on the book you got lately?? From one jinx to another, bad luck always passes. A good cyclist can make it though a stretch of bad luck and come out better on the other side.
 

·
Two skinny J's
Joined
·
21,193 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,397 Posts
Great info fellas, thanks.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top