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Deranged Touring Cyclist
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16mi on the Ice Cream Truck today. I didn't make it out until too late to do much exploration, but our fall color is just past peak, so I didn't need to explore new ground to find amazing views. Terrain was a mix of pavement, hard surface dirt, and mild singletrack. I explored some roads I've known about for years but never ridden because I didn't expect them to be fun.

Enter the Truck: deep, thumb sized layer of gravel over the road? Good for a very subtle increase in pedaling effort, no more. Badly washed out two track ascending an 8% grade? Gear down and spin. Very little body English, weight transfer, or other MTB type skill required. Point the bike where you want it to go and spin. I sure love this thing.
 

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Deranged Touring Cyclist
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6,122 Posts
Today found me not feeling my best after a crappy night's sleep. I decided to skip riding today before abruptly finding myself assembling my gear and heading out in hopes of spinning out at least a couple of miles around the neighborhood. Still aboard the Ice Cream Truck. I didn't need that much bike for the mostly hard surface dirt route I took, but it sure made my 23mi more fun than they otherwise would have been.

I did some mileage on the Highline Canal and rode to the interrupted portion for the first time in a while. Right at the Southern end, the Highline has a section where it runs through private land without any sort of public easement. This requires cutting through a local State Park in order to catch the canal once again as it emerges from the private land to run a few miles further. The Highline's final section before the interruption is fairly flat, but with lots of surface irregularity, loose sand over the top, and some washboarded sections.

I've actually been curious about the Truck's prospects on washboards, and today told me that I may be on the right track. When I spotted washboards, also known as corduroy road, I steered right for them. Even with tire pressure closer to 20psi than not, I barely felt the mild ones and the moderate ones weren't too bad, either. On any of my other bikes, any washboards are to be avoided at all costs.

Once they got into the usual eye-blurring, teeth rattling range, I found them still sh!tty, but less so than usual. I'm also fairly sure that airing down to the high single psi range would smooth even ugly washboards right out. In the event, I didn't want to air down only to have to re-inflate within a couple of miles. Once I was happy with the washboard result, I steered for the edge of the trail where they aren't so bad and had no trouble getting through the looser but flatter sand on the verge.

Ditto the two track leading into the park from the point where the private property begins. I've ridden it before on my touring bike, but there's so much loose sand that it wasn't a fast or fun ride. On the touring bike. Enter the Truck. Getting there wasn't as fast, but I blew through the sandy sections almost like I was riding on pavement before blasting down a slope I'd have had to pick my way down on any of my other bikes. Terrain that's actively hazardous to a 2.2" diameter tire might as well be paved for the Truck's 4.8" diameter monsters.

After that, a short paved section brought me to some mild singletrack where the fall colors combined with the fading sunlight to literally take my breath away more than once. I actually groaned once in pure bliss at a view which I tried but feel certain I failed to capture on 'film'. Sorry, but some things, you just have to be there to see.

What a ride! To think I tried to stay home and ride the couch at first. I will remember this one for a long time.
 

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Deranged Touring Cyclist
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6,122 Posts
What a day, what a ride! I headed out on the Ice Cream Truck with temps in the mid 70's and an aim to ride a local trail with the highly creative name, "Douglas County East-West Trail". This is one of the area's newer trails, with lots of elevation changes and a fair amount of trail erosion as a result. I've ridden it before, but not far, or very fast. Enter the Truck. I didn't need anything like 4.8" diameter tires to ride this trail, but having them meant more confidence and significantly more speed on the descents. What fun! I didn't have as much time as I'd have liked, and turned back early. I hadn't realized how much I'd been climbing outbound. Returning was much faster.

That gave me time to ride into a nearby state park and enjoye an old section of trail which I haven't been able to ride for years. Once, it was part of the park's primary trail. Then there was a series of floods and the river began flowing over a portion of the trail. The park's administration subsequently rebuilt the trail elsewhere, and it's a beautiful ride. Today I explored the old trail now that the water is low enough to leave the whole thing high and dry. The Truck ate up the mild singletrack before barely noticing the deep sand at the dry river crossing. From there, I made my way to the shore of a reservoir I usually paddle board on and rode a ways in the sand along the water.

I had to work harder to cross the dry, deep, sand ringing the lake, but rolled over the damp stuff with just a little more felt effort than riding singletrack. That was really cool. Climbing out was, too: exiting the trail involves a short, loose 12% grade followed by an extended, loose 9% grade. I have climbed this before, but as usual the Truck made it easier. I'd love to have stayed out longer, but at least I made it out, and got 27 sweet miles to boot. Our fall color is in full swing and about any direction one looks is worthwhile.
 

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Spin Spin Spin
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4,394 Posts
Not a sk8board post......primarily.....busted out 26 miles on a warm windy sunny day on some old school 26erness......scouting out places to sk8 on the longboard, lol. Found a coupla good spots. Waiting on a backpack bag to carry it in until I make a pvc rack for it or shell out the coin for one that attaches to the rack on the fishing bike vertical pannier style. 42" a bit long for handlebar mounts. Oh yeah, supposed to be bike post....
Bicycle Wheel Tire Bicycle wheel rim Bicycle wheel
Bicycle Wheel Tire Crankset Bicycle hub
 

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tall old member
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1,609 Posts
I rode forty miles yesterday. I rode around Lake Latonka, on out through Stoneboro and Sandy Lake then out to lake Wilhelm. I was surprised by my accomplishments at lake Wilhelm. Strava shows I have ridden one long hilly segment 65 times in the last ten years. Yesterday I had my third fastest time. Last week I had my second fastest time and in 2017 I had my fastest time. I didn’t expect to get faster in my seventies.

I mentioned before that to come home from Wilhelm I just about have to do a segment called the Stoneboro Grind. Almost everybody does it faster than me (I have never actually seen another rider on this climb so I’ll take Strava’s word for it). When I looked at how I do compared to other over 70 riders I discovered although I have done the grind 56 times no other riders over 70 have done it.

As I was getting close to home I saw that I needed another three miles to give me an even 40 for the day. I took a gravel road to the right, then a short section of pavement and finished off with two miles of my dirt road. My dirt road was almost unridable. Every time they work on my road they made it worse. This time they dumped yellow clay on the road and smeared it around, then they sprinkled broken rock the size of my fist on top of the clay. The sharp edges of the rock would surely cut a tire if you hit them wrong. It was like riding an obstacle course trying to miss all the big sharp rocks. I would like to see one of the guys that did that to my road have to ride a bike on it.

Tomorrow I’m going riding up at Pymatuning State Park with my girlfriend. We rented a cabin up there for a couple days.
 

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16mi on the Ice Cream Truck today. I didn't make it out until too late to do much exploration, but our fall color is just past peak, so I didn't need to explore new ground to find amazing views. Terrain was a mix of pavement, hard surface dirt, and mild singletrack. I explored some roads I've known about for years but never ridden because I didn't expect them to be fun.

Enter the Truck: deep, thumb sized layer of gravel over the road? Good for a very subtle increase in pedaling effort, no more. Badly washed out two track ascending an 8% grade? Gear down and spin. Very little body English, weight transfer, or other MTB type skill required. Point the bike where you want it to go and spin. I sure love this thing.
I got out for a 10 mile bike ride the other day, too. And picked trails that I had avoided before. I purposely chose them because all the others were boring. And I didn't regret it, because it was more interesting than I expected. For example, I found some abandoned and beautiful places to go for a picnic :)
UPD: I also recently found an old frame from a bike that can be restored. It's intact, it's just old.
 

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Deranged Touring Cyclist
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6,122 Posts
I got out for a 10 mile bike ride the other day, too. And picked trails that I had avoided before. I purposely chose them because all the others were boring. And I didn't regret it, because it was more interesting than I expected. For example, I found some abandoned and beautiful places to go for a picnic :)
Way to go! Exploring new ground by bike is the best. I hope you're able to enjoy some more saddle time soon.
 

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Deranged Touring Cyclist
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6,122 Posts
Worst move in ages! Today I got the chance to head out on the Ice Cream Truck for its first ride in falling snow. For those who don't know, I enjoy riding in the snow. A lot. It's best while still falling. Chek, and check! I threw my gear on and headed out. With temps in the mid 30's F, the snow wasn't sticking, but plenty was falling. I got my clothing options right, except for one thing: my gloves were not only too lightweight, they proved much less water resistant than I remember. They were never waterproof, but used to be good for hours in similar conditions. I think. It's been a couple of years.

In any event, they became soaking wet almost immediately. My soon hands began to get chilled and stiff. Otherwise, I was warm and comfortable. Having a total blast on my new bike. The hand thing was clearly an issue. Fortunately, I had brought a spare set of gloves. Unfortunately, I forgot that their liners are basically superglue relative to wet fingers and hands. It was damp enough and I was sufficiently snow covered that drying my hands to the level required was a non starter. I flatly could not get my hands into the [email protected] gloves. I tried until I began getting cold all over. Nothing doing, silly as that admittedly sounds. By then the old gloves had had a chance to gather even more water from the falling snow and grow properly chilled inside.

I ended up stowing all the gloves and setting out for home bare-handed. For those who may be unaware, this is not recommended at 34*F with lots of wet snow falling. Fortunately, I only had a few miles to go and made home without further issue. I'm really bummed to have missed out on most of my first snow ride on the fat bike, but without gloves, trying to continue would have been stupid at best. In any event, this was just our first snow of the year. Late, but it's falling like it means it. I will try again. Maybe today, maybe the next storm.
 

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tall old member
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1,609 Posts
I saw the ten day forecast and called Karen and set this up. It was 70° on Monday and almost seventy on Tuesday. We went hiking on the trails on Tuesday. It rained all day Wednesday and back to temps in the thirties since then.
I did go out for a short 12 mile ride yesterday. I put my fancy saddle back on to see if my butt could handle it. Not sure, my hands and ears were freezing so I couldn’t think of my butt. Have to start wearing the lobster claws.
 

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Deranged Touring Cyclist
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6,122 Posts
I had a beautiful 12 mile ride with Karen and her dog Grace. Grace ran the first three miles and then we stopped back at the cabin and hooked up the trailer. Probably should have hooked it up before we started but the cabin was on the way anyway. View attachment 55629
I love seeing a dog out running with her cyclist! Even better that she has a trailer and isn't obliged to run. Better still, the lead arm attached low on the bike looks perfect for that size canine. A lot of people around my area don't seem to understand that last. Very cool. I dig the bike, too :giggle:.
 

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tall old member
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1,609 Posts
I love seeing a dog out running with her cyclist! Even better that she has a trailer and isn't obliged to run. Better still, the lead arm attached low on the bike looks perfect for that size canine. A lot of people around my area don't seem to understand that last. Very cool. I dig the bike, too :giggle:.
This is the first time I saw her ride this bike. With all the stuff we were bringing up to the cabin her front wheel drive recumbent Cruiser bike wouldn’t fit. This bike fits on the rear rack.
This dog is amazing, I’m so glad she brought her dog. She is so funny when Karen and I are paying attention to each other and not her she gets jealous and starts dancing around wanting to play.t
 
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