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Junior Member
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My new Motobecane Adventure has Tektro Novela Disc Brakes front/rear. I've never experienced such poor stopping power in my life.

I am a mechanical person by nature and have adjusted as per youtube instructions...pretty straightforward adjustment.

There is no way these things are half as good as the rim brakes on my old Iron Horse.

I did read somewhere about the pads needing to be "broken in"; not sure how long that process is and what difference it will make in stopping power.

I have read some reviews and most folks write the Tektro Novela's off as junk. Can I expect anything more out of them, or should I simply consider buying better quality brakes?
 

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Total noob (& forum admin)
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They will require a break-in period. Since my Wahoo has the same brakes, I can vouch for their uninspired performance, but they do the job.
 

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Junior Member
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thought I might rough up the pads a bit to give them some grip. I need to get this bike out & ride it some! :rolleyes:
 

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Junior Member
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Did you adjust yours to approx. .012 like I've seen mentioned in vids, or do you simply tighten them down & then back them off a bit till the wheel spins free?

I'm surprised that the Wahoo didn't come with higher end brakes...
 

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Total noob (& forum admin)
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They seemed to be pretty well adjusted when I got the bike. For around $60 or so, you can get a new set of Avid BB5 brakes on eBay. My guess is that I can sell the used Tektro brakes for $30 pretty easily, making this a no-brainer upgrade. But I'm not in any rush.
 

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Junior Member
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
LOL - you must have read my mind. I was actually thinking of doing just that, except I was looking at Avid Elixir 1 Hydraulic front/rear set on ebay for around $85.00.

Doesn't come with rotors, looks complete otherwise.
 

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Total noob (& forum admin)
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I've never used hydraulic brakes, simply because I prefer being able to service my brakes with nothing more than a pocket tool and spare cable.
 

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Yesterday tired old man, Today retired old man
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Allso clean the roters with denatured alcahole and clean rag any paint store should have it. I would aline the caliper first then the the pad ajustment then clean. The closer the inside pad stationary pad is to the rotar the less modulation and quicker stop, the rotar is made to bend a little so the brakes dont lock right up as it will if the stationary pad is to close.


My ¢¢
 

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Junior Member
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
wild,

Good call on cleaning the rotors. In my haste to get this thing assembled and subsequent issues, I didn't even give that a thought.

I cleaned both rotors with alcohol (be careful not to get any on the paint) and I did notice an immediate improvement. The rear brake is responding/grabbing nicely, the front one has a little way to go yet.

I suppose a few more rides with gradual braking as IH suggested should do it. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
odd that both of you feel they're lacking. I've got the same on my GT hybrid, and even with all the kids and the trailer on the bike (think adding another 130lbs to my all ready hefty 200lbs) they stop really quick. even after warming them up on long downhills.
Maybe there are different pad materials that grip better. I would think that they all come with the same pads though, I don't know.
 
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