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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, I'm a complete Newbie... So please don't hate me to much for asking the question in the Title.

I've been doing a bit of paved bike trail riding in Southern California area over the last 2 years on my Specialized Sirrus (hybrid). Anywhere from 25 miles to 75 miles per ride. I like the distance so I can "Zen" out, not really a need for speed. I been just riding in my sweats and tennis / running shoes.

Yesterday, I finally picked up a 2010 Specialized Tarmac Comp Double Rival (road bike) at a pretty good deal of $1700 new. I'm pretty sure I'll need some riding shorts or undergarment because the saddle on the Tarmac is virtually not there compared to my old trusty Sirrus... But do I really need the fancy pedal and shoes? Or should I? And why? And I'm looking at keeping it under $190 for shoes and pedal.

Advice?

thanks.
 

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Once they are correctly set up, good shoes/pedals will keep you in proper alignment, and allow more efficient riding and a smoother pedal stroke. Of course, if that's not important to you...

Pricepoint offers excellent combo deals, but I suggest you check with your LBS so you can get the correct size, and have them help you align your cleats. If budget is a big concern, I'd spend money for the most comfortable shoes I could afford, and get some basic pedals for now. A $50 shoe/pedal combo will be more efficient than your Nikes and flat pedals. Shoes get lighter and stiffer (and uglier) as price goes up. Pedals get lighter, have better bearings, and sit lower on their axle as price goes up.
 

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You need pedals/shoes.
They don't need to be expensive, but you should get a set.

The bike most likely came without.

I use mountain bike spd type pedals. They are easy to get in to/out of, have more float(heel movement),and the shoes are MUCH less geeky.
 

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Yes you will find the extra expense worth it in the long run. Why??? With the shoes and cleats ie pedals, you can pull up as well as push down making the whole ride more efficient and faster. Don't ride in heavy traffic though till you get used to get in and out of the pedals.

As far as geeky, that train left my station a long time ago and I have a line that I will steal from a podcast.

Hello. My name is Mark, and I'm a Fred.
 

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Corona, huh? I'm from Norco :) I'm curious where you ride there - I'm now in Colorado and can't imagine riding in the IE.
As to your question, once you get used to them, you'll find them much better than flat pedals. Like previously stated, you'll pedal more efficiently by using your entire stroke rather than just pushing down on the pedals. My husband was hesitant at first, too, so I started him out with "campus pedals" - flat on one side, SPD on the other. That way you'll have the flat pedal you're used to while learning how to use the cleats. I see this transition on a lot of noobs. I got his set at Performance for like $100 total - shoes and pedals. They came with what I call "commuter" shoes - they call them mountain bike shoes, but they look like normal shoes with recessed cleats - no tread or anything like "real" mountain bike shoes. They are easy to walk around in since they are flat, and you could wear them on your other bike, too. A good "fit" is a must, since cycling is a repetitive motion, and improper cleat placement can cause an injury.
 

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Slowin it up.
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I don't use them, but I have to buy new shoes regularly from using them up. I wear Chucks most of the time, and the cap always gets rubbed off.
 

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Yesterday tired old man, Today retired old man
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I rode about 4000 miles so far this year all on flat pedals and boat shoes that have a allmost flat tread. When I fell last year I was glad I was not cliped iin I was able to rool over to the sholder and get out of the way caus thay an't going to stop. If I had cliples pedals I might have bin able to unclip. I don't know why thay call them clipless caus you sure seam to be cliped to them:D
well that is my .02
 

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Wild, they're called clipless, because they have cleats, not clips. Remember clips?



Go back to post 5, and click on the words "good read". I promise you won't be disappointed.
 

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As far as going "Fred"...

We have a small amount of choice here.
One does not need to get a jersey that advertises a cell phone or yogurt company.
There is really nothing WRONG with a standard, say, blue or red riding jersey and black shorts. advertising nothing..
I see roadies go by me looking all the "tour De France".
In my eyes...GEEK(fred), not a good look.

Just saying...
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Corona, huh? I'm from Norco :) I'm curious where you ride there - I'm now in Colorado and can't imagine riding in the IE...
You missed out. There's the Upper Santa Ana River Trail (SART) that starts/ends at Hidden Valley Nature Center right off of Arlington Avenue in Riverside/Norco to Waterman and Hospitality Row in San Bernardino (20 miles 1 way). Then there's the Lower SART that start/end at Green River Road to Newport Beach / Huntington Beach board (30 miles 1 way).

Okay, I gave in. I went to Performance today and bought the Shimano Ultegra pedals and the Shimano R086 road shoes. I spent the evening in my living room, holding on to something while clicking in and out of the pedal.

I can see why everyone falls at least once. To click-out, seems to be a very forceful, violent movement that can seem easy to upset balance on a bike. That was with the pedal's tension setting to the lowest. Is this just a break-in process?
 

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Two skinny J's
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I can see why everyone falls at least once. To click-out, seems to be a very forceful, violent movement that can seem easy to upset balance on a bike. That was with the pedal's tension setting to the lowest. Is this just a break-in process?
Before long you will be doing it as naturally as walking and won't even think about it. You will come to like the feel of new cleats that click in tight! Falling over will get you at the most inopportune ( like there is really a good time for it to happen ?)time ! It WILL happen :)
 

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Yesterday tired old man, Today retired old man
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Wild, they're called clipless, because they have cleats, not clips. Remember clips?



Yes I rember clips :rolleyes: I have some hanging in the shead. If you look at the clipless pedals, in there is a clip of some sort that holds the pedal to the cleat ;) so I think of them as being cliped in :D not as toe clips
 

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You missed out. There's the Upper Santa Ana River Trail (SART) that starts/ends at Hidden Valley Nature Center right off of Arlington Avenue in Riverside/Norco to Waterman and Hospitality Row in San Bernardino (20 miles 1 way). Then there's the Lower SART that start/end at Green River Road to Newport Beach / Huntington Beach board (30 miles 1 way).
huh.... I thought most of that east of like Prado Dam was dirt, not paved. We used to ride horses down there as kids (though, it's been damn near 20 years since I've been on a horse!) My cousin did used to ride her bike from Corona to Yorba Linda for work when they lived near Corona High School using that trail. I'll have to check it out the next time we "go home" for something.

I went to Performance today and bought the Shimano Ultegra pedals and the Shimano R086 road shoes....I can see why everyone falls at least once. To click-out, seems to be a very forceful, violent movement that can seem easy to upset balance on a bike. That was with the pedal's tension setting to the lowest. Is this just a break-in process?
What kind of pedals are they? The SPD or Road Pedals? Looks like the shoes can take either kind of cleat. I absolutely HATE Road Pedals. Maybe I didn't give them enough time, but I had the hardest time getting out of the things. After a week in them, and falling like 4 times (the first being in the parking lot of Performance as I road my BRAND NEW BIKE home) I went back and they switched them out to SPD for me.

Plug here for Performance - I do love that I can buy and try something and take it back. My shoes were all scratched, as were the pedals, from me falling, and they took them back and exchanged them for different ones then switched out the pedals for me and put the new cleats on the new shoes. I've ordered online, received clothing that was too big and took it to the store where they allowed me to exchange it for something else. And I work for a different bike shop :)
 

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I have been using clipless for years and still every now and then will be clipped in at a stop and need to make an emergency separation.

I haven't fallen over on my new bike...yet. Got it last year and have 3500 miles on it.
(thin aluminum and carbon fiber bike frames do not take nicely to falling, so be aware...)
 

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You don't "need" clipless pedals/shoes but if you go that route, I am sure you will really like them. Like Hack had written, you don't have to go expensive, or fancy for that matter. But get the better shoe over more expensive pedals. Good luck and let us know what you end up doing.
 

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Been there done that but, I went off the side.

Newport Beach, still have the chain ring marks on my calf, 5 of them. She was a nurse and she dressed my leg between laughs.

I need to work harder at keeping the rubber side down, did it again two years ago, just a shined knee.
 
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