Does a bike have to have 700C wheels to be a "hybrid?

Discussion in 'General Bike Discussion' started by noneed429r, Jan 16, 2010.

  1. noneed429r

    noneed429r Recovering Retrogrouch

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    I was wondering if most people here consider that for a bike to be a "hybrid" does it have to have 700C wheels ?

    I am building up a new bike for myself which I consider a 26" wheel hybrid or a "Mountain Lite" bike

    It is going to have light alum hardtail frame (Performance Bikes Access XCL butted alum frame), flat handlebars with bar-ends, 48,38,26 crankset with 12-28 rear cluster,
    light XC type wheelset shod with 1.9 or 1.95 kevlar bead semi-slick on/off road tires. and a Rock Shox Dart 3 80mm fork.

    Being that it will have a lighter duty fork, somewhat narrower and more "dual purpose" tires, flat vs. riser bars, and a bit higher gearing than what a typical XC mountain bike is nowadays, it will be my idea of a burly hybrid.

    I plan on using it for fireroads, city streets, path and occasional smoother singletrack.

    So in your minds would this qualify as a hybrid?

    Thanks
     
  2. IanHighfield

    IanHighfield New Member

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    I like the mountain lite handle. For me once you stick a spring fork on it's a mountain bike of some sort.
     

  3. Doohickie

    Doohickie Older than Hack

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    Wheel size does not make bike style. I would call it a hybrid.
     
  4. HandsomeRyan

    HandsomeRyan ♥'s Bicycles

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    Generally, within this segment of bikes 26" wheeled bikes are known as "comfort bikes" and 700c wheeled bikes are "hybrids" but this is not always true and if it is your bike you should call it whatever you want. :)
     
  5. Skidmark

    Skidmark Cycling for life

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    Sounds like a great bike what ever you call it bro.
     
  6. Mootsguy

    Mootsguy A Red Headed Stepchild

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    In the end they're all just bikes.
     
  7. wild

    wild Yesterday tired old man, Today retired old man

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    That pertty much describes my Explorer 2.0 made by Jamis
     

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    Last edited: Jan 27, 2010
  8. noneed429r

    noneed429r Recovering Retrogrouch

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    It's morphed a bit so far

    Thanks for all the replies. I got the frame from Performance in the mail and I am quite pleased, lots of nicely formed frame tubes and very light 3.9 lbs in the 18" frame size. Instead of the dart 3 fork, I went a bit nicer and got a Tora SL. The Tora has still got V-brake capability which is what i was looking for. I really don't think discs are THAT much better for regular riding short of big Downhilling or Freeriding. I have never had stopping issues even back when everyone was using cantilevers. So V-bakes it is. They will save me some weight over discs too.
    Got a nicer Dimension Adjustable stem instead of a fixed angle one so I can change my positioning a bit if needed. I see alot of adjustable stems on factory hybrid bike models so I guess I will call that a "Hybrid" part. I'm going to use an older Answer Taperlite flat handlebar; not the most current but nice and light and has a good feeling 7 degree sweep.

    Well now Ive got to find a set of wheels and get a seatpost for the next installment of parts.

    Building up a bike is so much fun but you really don't save any money over buying a complete bike. You do get to hand pick all the parts somewhat conform the bike to your own riding style though. ;)
     
  9. KC-Steve

    KC-Steve New Member

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    Nice bike Wild.

    The question about a hybrid has been bothering me too since I picked up an old Raleigh Tangent MTB free from Craigslist this week. I would like to convert it to a hybrid so I researched the definition of a hybrid. Wikipedia doesn't offer a lot of help. They tell of variations of hybrids such as "cross bike, commuter, city, and comfort bikes." The seat alone tells whether it is intended more for off-road, comfort or speed. The handlebar is usually the flat style for upright riding position. Gearing also determines whether it is built more for off-road or street. And when it comes to tires, it looks like air pressure and foot-print pattern are more important as to its primary use. I think a 26" tire is very common on hybrids.

    After looking around at Trek, Cannondale, and Giant, it looks more like a hybrid is simply a combination of uses, and where you intend to use it most often determines the "sub-catagory" of the hybrid.

    Hope that helps, :)
    Steve
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2010
  10. noneed429r

    noneed429r Recovering Retrogrouch

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    I must agree with you KC-Steve, There seems to be a lot of grey area in categorizing bicycle types from the major manufacturers currently. I see bikes that have the 700c wheels, flat bars, mid-width tires and triple crankset; but they may be called "Urban Bikes", "Flat bar Road Bikes", "Comfort Bikes", "Path Bikes", "Cross Terrain Bikes", "Commuter Bikes", or simply "Hybrids".....Sheesh!

    I think here is where the Europeans got a better handle on this as they call most bikes in this in between category "Trekking Bikes".

    Add to that the confusing categories of Mountain Bikes where you have: Hardtail XC bikes, Hardtail Dirt- Jump bikes, Clydesdale Hardtail bikes, Full Suspension XC bikes, Full Suspension All-Mountain bikes, Full Suspension Enduro Bikes, and a myriad of Full Suspension Downhill bikes.

    Just when did cycling get so complicated anyway?

    Kind of makes me want to go back to 1974 when I was riding around on my red Banana Seat bike, you know the kind with the short sissy bar in back, Slick rear tire and ape-hanger handlebars. Back then there was only two words I used when categorizing my bicycle.......Fun and Freedom !!
     
  11. KC-Steve

    KC-Steve New Member

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    He-he, I had one of those bikes in the mid-sixties. I guess all these complicated categories aren't necessarily new. I remember when rock and roll was just rock. Then came Metal Rock, Glitter Rock, Punk Rock, ...etc and that's when I started listening to Jazz. Then came Jazz Fusion ........ :)

    Steve
     
  12. MRB

    MRB New Member

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    The Commencal Combi I have, you can lock the hydraulic front forks solid or unlock them for a suspended ride. I guess you could call it Hybrid (the rear has no suspension) my brother call his bike like this a hard tail. To me it's just a bicycle.
     
  13. noneed429r

    noneed429r Recovering Retrogrouch

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    Well for me I have never called any bicycle "just a bicycle" but I know what you are trying to say.

    A bicycle is never "Just a Bicycle" , is is rather a Freedom Companion, a Faithful Friend, a Reliable Two-wheeled Steed, a Vehicle for Adventure and Escape, An Ecologically and Beautifully Efficient Machine. A thing to experience both alone and with others.
    It has been called "The Noblest invention of Mankind" It has partnered in the establishment of women rights, was the precursor to both automotive and aeronautics, has allowed reliable transportation and recreation from the poorest to the richest people on earth. And for most of us as youngsters gave us some of our first experiences of youthful freedom.
    Not to mention the classic form of a bicycle is a work of art with its combination of circles and triangles and simple mechanical elegance.

    So I'm not flaming or being disrespectful to you but a bicycle to me is always much more than that.
     
  14. noneed429r

    noneed429r Recovering Retrogrouch

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    MRB, I looked the Commencal Combi up on the net and I must say you have a very nice bike there. Seems like it was a big value leader in it's price categories too.
    I just wanted to add and tell you that since I had waxed a little too eloquently over your reply....You can at least see of my deep love for bicycles.
     
  15. MRB

    MRB New Member

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    No worries and no offence taken. I do love this bicycle and I think it's the best bike I've ever owned. Just wish I had more time to go riding.

    I am a telcom contractor and travel alot lately. When and if I get home on weekends I try to get at least 1/2 day bike outings, when the weather is good, on the local bike trails in the area. I'll have to say these rides are relaxing and stress reducing for me.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2010
  16. noneed429r

    noneed429r Recovering Retrogrouch

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    Got it completed !

    Well I finally got the bike built. It didn't evolve to be as much of a 26" wheel hybrid as I originally planned. It's more of a comfortable hard tail all-purpose MTB. I went with bigger tires than I had originally planned (Conti Flow 2.3s) but they have a fairly minimal knob pattern and roll pretty well on asphalt when pumped up to 60 psi. Heck, they were on sale at the LBS, were light for their size and are Continental quality.
    I also forgo-ed the flat Taperlight bar for an Answer Prolight 1.5 rise handlebar and the positioning is perfect for me. I kept the adjustable stem and the comfy Planet Bike saddle and it rides like a plush Cadillac to me.

    I am also glad I did not go for the disc brakes and got the nice Avid SD7 V-Brakes instead. They modulate very well and have plenty of stopping power. not to mention about half the weight of discs.

    The bike came in at 26.5 lbs. Which I am fully happy with for such a comfy ride with nothing really exotic on it.
     

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  17. 1stthings1st

    1stthings1st New Member

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    these bikes are good in trainers

    I don't know if anyone is a fan of using a hybrid in a trainer. But it should be mentioned that when in a trainer a hybrid and decent trainer make a great piece of exercise equipment.
     
  18. RUSHTHEMALL

    RUSHTHEMALL ALWAYS IN A RUSH

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    cannondale deemed mine a hybrid,its a scalple +prophet =RUSH
    NICEBIKE NONEED,,i was also considering a nice soft seat for comfort,but i was told not to by bike peeps:confused:
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2010
  19. wwayne

    wwayne New Member

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    Disk brake advantage

    Don't count disk breaks out.

    Bikes benefit from disk brakes for the same reason Autos do. Wet weather stopping control. Winter darkness hides the true nature weather will bring for the day and the commute is spaced by many hours at work. The weather man has been known to miss.

    Wet dry or dirty, they perform well and predictably. Rubber bads do not.

    Also, The fork bending forces from breaking are probably less for disk brakes. With calipers, the fork bending force from forward momentum is equal and opposite at the tire patch and brake pads. With disk brakes, the braking force is concentrated at the end of the fork (by design) and the forward momentum is felt up through the steering bearings.
     
  20. ViBiker

    ViBiker Banned

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    More than any other single factor, the definition of "Hybrid", "Mountain" or "Comfort" Bike is simply a function of the type of tire you install. ...
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2011