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Now that I have my new bike, I wondering if doing my own maintenance is a good idea. I am mechanicly inclined, and would like to do it, but I wonder if I should just leave it all to the LBS. Is there anywhere I can get detailed instructions on MY specific components (Shimano Ultegra {I think 6600}). I would love to do this, but I don't want to start experimenting on my bike without first understanding how things come apart and go back together. Also, I'm sure I'll have to get specific tools, maybe a torque wrench and more. Any suggestions?
 

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It's a bicycle. Check the Park Tools website, and Sheldon Brown. Other than a few things involving specialized tools, there's not much you can't do. Routine maintenance only requires a few basic tools.
 

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What's a Headshok?
It's one of Cannondale's many attempts to reinvent the wheel. Well, figuratively that is. Actually, they reinvented the suspension fork putting the squishy part between the crown and head tube and then they reinvented it again with the Lefty.
 

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It's one of Cannondale's many attempts to reinvent the wheel. Well, figuratively that is. Actually, they reinvented the suspension fork putting the squishy part between the crown and head tube and then they reinvented it again with the Lefty.
Have you ridden one? The stiffness is awesome. I've only got about 80mm of travel, but rolling on 88 needle bearings, it's silky. Just hard to tune. And servicing one intimidated me.

Off their wiki:

Cannondale has also developed a suspension fork called the Lefty. It started with the "Headshok" (aka "Fatty") forks. It uses 88 needle bearings to reduce friction for smooth travel with the bearings telescoping inside the steerer tube of the fork. This eliminates flexing of the fork legs and also eliminates static friction, which must be overcome before the fork begins to travel.
 

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Have you ridden one? The stiffness is awesome. I've only got about 80mm of travel, but rolling on 88 needle bearings, it's silky. Just hard to tune. And servicing one intimidated me.

Off their wiki:

Cannondale has also developed a suspension fork called the Lefty. It started with the "Headshok" (aka "Fatty") forks. It uses 88 needle bearings to reduce friction for smooth travel with the bearings telescoping inside the steerer tube of the fork. This eliminates flexing of the fork legs and also eliminates static friction, which must be overcome before the fork begins to travel.
No, I have never ridden one. I've heard that they are stiff though. A friend of mine has an old Super V that had a headshok. He ended up selling his Fatty and replacing it with a traditional fork to get more travel.

For me, I'd rather ride a rigid fork than one with only 80mm's.
 

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No, I have never ridden one. I've heard that they are stiff though. A friend of mine has an old Super V that had a headshok. He ended up selling his Fatty and replacing it with a traditional fork to get more travel.

For me, I'd rather ride a rigid fork than one with only 80mm's.
I had replaced it with a regular fork for about a week, while it was getting serviced. It was like a wet noodle in comparison. But I've been riding since the first RockShox came out, so I still appreciate 80mm. My tandem MTB had a 5" fork though.
 

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I had replaced it with a regular fork for about a week, while it was getting serviced. It was like a wet noodle in comparison. But I've been riding since the first RockShox came out, so I still appreciate 80mm. My tandem MTB had a 5" fork though.
Have you ridden anything with a through axle? I think the QR skewer is going to be going the way of the Dodo bird for just that reason.
 

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Have you ridden anything with a through axle? I think the QR skewer is going to be going the way of the Dodo bird for just that reason.
Yeah, my tandem had a 20mm front axle. I can see that 15mm being the new standard at some point, even on XC bikes. But consumer level bikes will keep the QR for a long time. My girlfriend's Boulder wouldn't benefit from a bigger axle.
 

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It's a bicycle. Check the Park Tools website, and Sheldon Brown. Other than a few things involving specialized tools, there's not much you can't do. Routine maintenance only requires a few basic tools.
Totally agree, check out the above sites, excellent sources of information.

Also think about getting a bike work stand, they make life a lot easier especially if your working index gears etc. No sore backs from being bent double doing repairs.
 
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