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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
This is a thread to help me remember when I replace my drive train components. I can't really remember unless I write it down. If anyone else wants to document their drivetrain maintenance here, you're welcome to, please do. Cleaning, lubricating, replacing, post here whenever you give your drive train some loving.

I was replacing my chains when they measured between "good" and "fair" on my chain measuring tool. I think I have replaced the chain on each of my work horses at least three times without replacing cogs or chainrings. By changing the chain long before the chain measuring device says "replace", I limited the wear on the gears so they continued to work well with a new chain.

The easiest way to remove a Sram Powerlink is to put it on your big ring like this and hit it with a hammer. I tapped almost straight on, but slightly from the rear and it popped right open!


I forgot to check them for a while and both chains got stretched more than I would like. Yesterday I replaced both chains.

The Cannondale H300 chain measured "fair"



I replaced the chain yesterday and I test rode it. I expected it to skip and it did but not often. Most attempts to cause it to skip failed in all cogs. The chain skipped very little over the course of a ride that was about 7 miles long. I will try to use this new chain with the used gears and see if it works OK in in traffic and/or pulling big loads.

The Marin Mill Valley measured "replace".




The cogs looked like this.






I have owned and used this bike for 2 years without replacing the cogset, which is a really long time for me. I used at least 4 chains with this cogset. I didn't try to use these old cogs with the new chain. I replaced the cogs and chain yesterday. Coincidentally, the rear shift cable recently snapped, so the cable is new and I replaced the housing too.


I did not know that my stock small cog was a 13! The "Megarange" freewheel, 13-34, a range of 2.6:1 was replaced with a 11-32, a range of 2.9:1, so I've gone beyond "Megarange"! Wow! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I photograph the chain wear measuring tool because it's much easier for me to see what's going on with a flash photo macro shot that I can zoom in on. I can assess the chain wear much better with the camera. I can't hold my hand steady or see anything now I'm getting old. I shoot with the camera until I get a few shots in focus and with the tool aligned with the chain.
 

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qmsdc15 said:
This is a thread to help me remember when I replace my drive train components. I can't really remember unless I write it down. If anyone else wants to document their drivetrain maintenance here, you're welcome to, please do. Cleaning, lubricating, replacing, post here whenever you give your drive train some loving.

I was replacing my chains when they measured between "good" and "fair" on my chain measuring tool. I think I have replaced the chain on each of my work horses at least three times without replacing cogs or chainrings. By changing the chain long before the chain measuring device says "replace", I limited the wear on the gears so they continued to work well with a new chain.

The easiest way to remove a Sram Powerlink is to put it on your big ring like this and hit it with a hammer. I tapped almost straight on, but slightly from the rear and it popped right open!

I forgot to check them for a while and both chains got stretched more than I would like. Yesterday I replaced both chains.

The Cannondale H300 chain measured "fair"

I replaced the chain yesterday and I test rode it. I expected it to skip and it did but not often. Most attempts to cause it to skip failed in all cogs. The chain skipped very little over the course of a ride that was about 7 miles long. I will try to use this new chain with the used gears and see if it works OK in in traffic and/or pulling big loads.

The Marin Mill Valley measured "replace".

The cogs looked like this.

I have owned and used this bike for 2 years without replacing the cogset, which is a really long time for me. I used at least 4 chains with this cogset. I didn't try to use these old cogs with the new chain. I replaced the cogs and chain yesterday. Coincidentally, the rear shift cable recently snapped, so the cable is new and I replaced the housing too.

I did not know that my stock small cog was a 13! The "Megarange" freewheel, 13-34, a range of 2.6:1 was replaced with a 11-32, a range of 2.9:1, so I've gone beyond "Megarange"! Wow! :)
I really like that "ChainLove" logo. Do you mind if I make my self a decal that looks like that?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The Chainlove logo belongs to Chainlove.com. If you order something from them, you get a sticker. :)
 

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Yesterday tired old man, Today retired old man
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I buy 3 or 4 chains when every thing is new and I clean and lub my chain about 150 miles and rotate the chains, new, new, new, 1time, 1time, 1time, and so on. I think that way every thing wares togather and my chain ring and cogset don't seam to ware as soon. I put on about 3500, 4000 miles a year
my¢¢
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Sounds like a good plan, wild. I'm a little lazy I guess, I never remove my chain until it's time to replace. I know White Lightning is not the lube of choice among those that meticulously maintain their chains, but in my opinion, it does an adequate job of cleaning and lubing the chain when used as recommended.

The old cogs and new chain worked OK, but not perfect today. I think I will replace the cogs when a new cogset arrives in the mail later this week. A chain that skips only occasionally will skip when you most need it not to skip. When a bus is bearing down on you and you need to move, like RIGHT NOW!
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Good question. It should get a lot of responses. There are many opinions.

I don't add lube until the chain gets dry or dirty. The lube that comes on the chain is the best. When the chain appears to need some love, I clean and lube with a waxed based lube such as White Lightning or Rock N' Roll. I saturate the chain with lube, then run the chain through my hand (i should wear gloves) to work the lube in, then I wipe it off. I repeat this until the lube coming off is clean. Then I wipe thoroughly with a rag. If I've planned ahead, I let it dry at least 2hrs before riding.

The advantage of a wax based lube is that it will attract less dirt, thus less cleaning is required.
 

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I just replaced my SRAM PC971 9 speed chain after 7,100 miles over 2 1/2 years. The LBS estimated the chain was good for another 200 or 300 miles based on the stretch being a bit less than 1/16", but I decided to replace it anyway, before it did any cog damage.

I don't ride much in the wet, but do ride on a lot of grit. About 2,500 miles were on gravel or crushed stone. A lot of miles were hauling an extra 35 to 45 lb. The drive train is 24/36/48 with an 11-34 cassete. On hills I generally spin rather than stand and hammer.

I do not remove the chain, nor do I use chain cleaning solvents or devices. Cleaning amounts to running the chain thru a dry rag after each ride, till it is clean to the touch. I also wipe the cassettes, chain rings and clean the gunk from the deraileur pulleys.

About once a month, or after any ride in the rain or on wet surfaces, I apply a teflon based lube, like Finish Line Teflon+. The chain gets one drop of lube per roller, then it is run thru a rag til it is dry and clean to the touch.
 

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Added note on new chains ... The factory wax on a new chain is better than any lube I can possibly apply myself. I continue to wipe the new chain til clean after each ride, but, unless it starts to make noise, won't add any other lube for 2 or 3 months ... probably close to 1,000 mi.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I just replaced my SRAM PC971 9 speed chain after 7,100 miles over 2 1/2 years. The LBS estimated the chain was good for another 200 or 300 miles based on the stretch being a bit less than 1/16", but I decided to replace it anyway, before it did any cog damage.
That is amazing. :thumbsup:
 

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I only seam to get 1,500 miles on a chain befor the chain checker reads bad. I have used different kinds of lube but that is all I seam to get. I do a lot of cross chaining and think that has a lot to do with how little milage I get from my chains, and I use a good chain. I do have one of the chain cleaning machines that I put simple green in diluted befor lubing my chain
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
I don't have an odometer but I'm certain my mileage is much closer to wild's than to Larry's.

So after one day my chain looked like this!


Did it rain yesterday? Not while I was out there, and the roads had dried before I got out. The problem with the factory lube is it's very sticky. I think every piece of dust, every pollen grain, every grain of sand that got within an inch of my chain stuck to it.

If I hadn't started this thread, I would have shrugged, rode into town and gotten to work on time. I figured I should at least wipe it off, but the chain was so sticky, the rag stuck to it like glue, I could not wipe the crud off this chain!

I applied some Rock N' Roll lube, worked it into the chain with my bare hand, then wiped it off. I repeated this a couple of times. To prevent lube from getting on my rims or the sidewalk, I put pieces of plywood, but cardboard works at least as well. I used these boards many times as you can tell.


It looked clean to my old tired eyes, but you can see there is still some gunk on inside of the links. Hopefully most of the debris is only on surfaces that are not contacting other surfaces.


I did not have time to wait two hours. I waited about ten minutes. I think if I wait, the solvent evaporates leaving the wax in place. Because I did not wait, the solution probably got pushed out while it was still dillute and probably less wax remains in the chain than if I had done it right. Oh well.

I really like that "ChainLove" logo. Do you mind if I make my self a decal that looks like that?
I got mine!


I'm expecting a package from Chainlove this week. Send me your address via private message and I'll send you the sticker in exchange for a sticker you have created. :)
 

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qmsdc15 said:
I don't have an odometer but I'm certain my mileage is much closer to wild's than to Larry's.

So after one day my chain looked like this!

Did it rain yesterday? Not while I was out there, and the roads had dried before I got out. The problem with the factory lube is it's very sticky. I think every piece of dust, every pollen grain, every grain of sand that got within an inch of my chain stuck to it.

If I hadn't started this thread, I would have shrugged, rode into town and gotten to work on time. I figured I should at least wipe it off, but the chain was so sticky, the rag stuck to it like glue, I could not wipe the crud off this chain!

I applied some Rock N' Roll lube, worked it into the chain with my bare hand, then wiped it off. I repeated this a couple of times. To prevent lube from getting on my rims or the sidewalk, I put pieces of plywood, but cardboard works at least as well. I used these boards many times as you can tell.

It looked clean to my old tired eyes, but you can see there is still some gunk on inside of the links. Hopefully most of the debris is only on surfaces that are not contacting other surfaces.

I did not have time to wait two hours. I waited about ten minutes. I think if I wait, the solvent evaporates leaving the wax in place. Because I did not wait, the solution probably got pushed out while it was still dillute and probably less wax remains in the chain than if I had done it right. Oh well.

I got mine!

I'm expecting a package from Chainlove this week. Send me your address via private message and I'll send you the sticker in exchange for a sticker you have created. :)
Thanks, I'm gonna try this on my chain soon. I think this has what has been bothering me about my chain was that factory sticky lube and the stuff i was putting on wasn't staying...
 

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Did it rain yesterday? Not while I was out there, and the roads had dried before I got out. The problem with the factory lube is it's very sticky. I think every piece of dust, every pollen grain, every grain of sand that got within an inch of my chain stuck to it.

If I hadn't started this thread, I would have shrugged, rode into town and gotten to work on time. I figured I should at least wipe it off, but the chain was so sticky, the rag stuck to it like glue, I could not wipe the crud off this chain!
I took a different approach. The chain did not look much different from yours after about 15 mi in the rain today, but it did come clean with vigorous wiping.

I lightly grabbed the lower run of the chain with an old T-shirt, and cranked the pedal backwards. During the first 40 or 50 revolutionds I applied light pressure to the side plates, but only barely touching the rollers. The chain started very sticky, but became less so as the water came off. During the next 40 or 50 revolutions I applied a lot of pressure to the rollers, top, and bottom of the chain. The section I was holding was at about a 45 degree angle from the horizontal, so a lot of the crud on the rollers came off. When I was done there was still a lot of wax on the chain, but it was clean to the touch again.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I can not argue with your results, Larry!

In my case, I could not grab the chain lightly with an old t shirt. If the shirt touched the chain it would move with the chain and not stay in my hand. My chain was not wet, maybe that was the difference. Maybe if I had wrapped the cloth tightly around my hand to keep the chain from tugging it away...

OK, I forgot to clean my cogset before installing the new chain. That is undoubtably why the chain got so dirty so fast. Oops!
 

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I put a magnit in my chain cleaning machine and could not belive how much gunky metal was on it after I cleaned the chain. I have used waxy lube, oily lube, and the newer type like epic ride, and have not seen much differnce in chain ware. The chain is so lose fitting link to link, I don't see how it could not get junk in between the rolers and side plates that would grind away at the inerds. If you take the chain apart it is not the pin that the roller rides on but the iner side plates are made so as to hold the roller. It looks to me if you cross chain a lot it will increase the ware on the chain.
My ¢¢
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Hmm, yes. I need to work on the cross-chaining thing.

I see what you mean about the rollers and side plates but the pins must wear against the surfaces of the inner links where they contact under load.
 

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First with all due respect to the OP, you're freaking crazy for hitting your bike with a hammer. One thing I was always told is NEVER use a hammer on anything on my bike and NEVER hit my bike with a hammer for any reason. I was also told to NEVER use vice grips or a pipe wrench on my bike as well. If I don't have the correct tool, I either buy it, or take my bike to the shop.

Second when it comes to chain maintenance I take my bike to my local bike shop and have them use their chain measuring tool. I replace it when necessary. I have yet to ever replace the front chain rings or rear sprockets, due to wear. The front chain rings have been replaced because a collision with a car damaged them, but not because of normal wear and tear. And I have had my bike for over 10 years. I clean and lube my chain and bike regularly. I use Simple Green and the Park Tools chain cleaner. They work great.

In fact I just got done cleaning my bike. I am letting it air dry. Once my wife comes home I will load it on the carrier and take it for a drive to remove the excess water and lube it when I return home.
 

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I read this some place and it seams to work. after washing your bike pick it up about 6" and drop it on the tires a fue times it will shake a lot of water off , I think it is better than an air hose as that might push the water in places you don't want it.
 
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