Dropper Post

Discussion in 'Mountain Biking' started by Hazy, Sep 12, 2017.

  1. Hazy

    Hazy Active Member

    2,156
    11
    38
    Instead of veering off the subject in Rola's light thread,I'm starting a new one.

    To drop or not to drop. That's the question!

    I have been intrigued by the dropper post for awhile, but after ramming my left rib cage into the back of my seat on a ride in gnarly downhill stuff a while back it is becoming more than just an afterthought.

    For the most part I can maneuver behind my seat through sketchy stuff. Sometimes, especially when I'm trying to move faster than normal, that maneuver gets risky ( i.e. Situation above). After having taken the time to get my multi tool out and manually lowering my seat, I have seen some vast improvement on both my ability to maneuver through tough terrain and my confidence to do so. Hence putting the dropper post on my list for bike improvements.

    Any recommendations/warnings on makes and models? Please give reasons for such.

    Thanks!
     
  2. rola643

    rola643 Two skinny Js Admin Staff Tavern Member

    16,845
    36
    48
    I can't justify for myself based on those I know who have them. High cost and constant mechanical issues with failure rates being very high within a year. Example, we did a night ride last Friday and Andy had a demo bike ( a fine carbon Stumpjumper) with a dropper and the seat dropped twice during the ride that I am aware of. I can't give you numbers or percentages but they seem to see a fairly high failure rate in their shop. Can't even give you brands either.

    Robert @ Red Barn who builds my wheels uses and like droppers as well but admits to high failure rates as well. I've asked him in the past about them and if I ever did which brand to go with and in his opinion some are better quality than others but most will meet there demise sooner than later.

    I'm to poor to invest in something like that personally. Maybe if I was serious about mtb and raced I could try a wee bit harder to justify them but meh...

    Now somebody like Stumpy will come behind this and completely justify why you should invest.

    Let us know which one ya get :D
     

  3. rola643

    rola643 Two skinny Js Admin Staff Tavern Member

    16,845
    36
    48
  4. newleaf150

    newleaf150 Deranged Touring Cyclist Tavern Member

    4,371
    1
    36
    My boss at my first job back in the 80's was an avid mountain biker, and a very tall man. He used something called a Hite-Rite for on-the-fly saddle height adjustment. I don't think they're still in production, but it looks like fleabay has some NOS examples.

    They are not as visually attractive as a dropper post, but widely compatible and robust. They're also a bit more reasonably priced :D.
     
  5. stumpy29

    stumpy29 Member

    192
    2
    18


    Droppers are awesome. Seat up high for pedaling and down low for the gnar making it easier to man handle the bike around. I've got a Thomson dropper a ks lev a fox transfer and a pnw
     
  6. rynoman03

    rynoman03 Moderator Mod Team Tavern Member

    4,932
    2
    0
    I've been wanting one myself. I just don't like the $300.00 prices for the decent ones. Plus my bike is setup for internal dropper routing down the seat tube.
     
  7. dc5rn

    dc5rn New Member

    5
    4
    1
    I have a dropper post on my Stumpjumper and it's worth every penny. The control going downhill has definitely improved. It has also helped tackling obstacles
     
  8. kneedrachen

    kneedrachen Moderator Mod Team Tavern Member

    8,057
    29
    48
    Hacksaw and duct tape.

    Yer welcome.

    #ghettomtbhacks
     
    Hazy likes this.
  9. cwtch

    cwtch Active Member

    2,201
    13
    38
    I personally don't use them and don't like them. Have a few and every once in a while put one in. The weight isn't worth it. Then there is added maintenance on something I don't have to have. Then last of all I can not stand that every brand and every model has a slight horizontal side to side saddle movement. For me that is a deal breaker. I use my thighs to throw the bike about with the saddle between them. When it moves even just that tiny bit I can't go for it. All droppers have that 1/32 movement from left to right.

    Last I tend to get way off behind the saddle. If I drop it I do the same as bottom back is the only way I can descend really fast. Thus they don't do much for my riding besides slow me down on switch backs because of the play horizontally.

    That said others I know love them and won't ride without them.
    I can get you a Bontrager Drop Line new in the box for $250 which includes shipping.
    They MSRP for $286. They are internally routed only. So if your bike isn't made for that it won't work. Also seat post diameters are limited.
     
  10. cwtch

    cwtch Active Member

    2,201
    13
    38
    Secondary note. We service and see more issues with dropper posts than all other suspension issues combined at the shop I work at. The Bontrager ones are not as bad as the RockShox or KS which we see tons of. e13 is another we see a lot. Very very few Thompson ones have I seen with issues but they cost a ton and few have them. Have never seen a Crankbrothers one with an issue but only know one person who owns one.
    It is like a coin flip some last for years and others months. Brand doesnt much seem matter.
    I personally would never own a KS as they have issues and the company has flat out awful technical support. 9 out of 10 times you call them the machines says "we are unable to take your call at this time, goodbye". No prompt to leave a message just that after about seven rings.
    Anything Fox makes is super easy to service and they have a full tech site so no need call because it can all be looked up. But if you do call they a awesome.
    Trek support is great so the Bontrager is good.
    Crankbrothers is legit folks.
    Thompson has never let me down.
    If money isn't an issue get a Thompson.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2017 at 9:46 AM
    Hazy likes this.
  11. stumpy29

    stumpy29 Member

    192
    2
    18
    I’ve got a Thomson ks fox and pnw dropper all of them have been good to me. Thomson I’ve had almost as long as they’ve been making them. Only had to service it once. I second the ks support I broke a frame earlier this ear got a little rambunctious swapping parts over and broke the actuator on my lev and ks hasn’t returned mine or my lbs calls or emails. They make so many different posts we wanted to make sure we got the right part. Figured it out this morning so I’ll ge tit fixed so I can put it on my new chrome nimble9 single speed I’m building. Around here reverbs dominate and blow up all the time.
     
    Hazy likes this.
  12. cwtch

    cwtch Active Member

    2,201
    13
    38
    Agree about the reverbs. I feel bad saying it but we see so many with issues. The catch is probably 2/3 of bikes with a dropper have one. We still see way too many with an issue.

    And there is the thing. KS makes good stuff but they need answer their phone !

    On a side note just so my posts don't scare anyone away. Tons of people have droppers without service issues. They for some odd reason on average require more service than shocks and forks which doesn't make sense as they are used less but that therein may be the issue. A shock works the whole ride keeping seals wet and the like. Maybe the key is if you have a dropper, use it..?
     
  13. stumpy29

    stumpy29 Member

    192
    2
    18
    I break everything and my droppers have been great. My pnw is getting sticky but they have a thing on their website on how to service it so no big deal