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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I think I've settled on my first upgrade for my bike. Since I've only ever ridden with flat pedals, no toe straps, nothing, everyone says that some sort of attachment to the pedals is a huge boos in efficiency. So I kinda wanna try it! Only one problem, I have absolutely no idea what I'm doing! Could anyone give a recommendation?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Oh sorry, it's a Gravity Avenue road bike (yeah I know cheap ass thing but I'm poor :(

p.s. I know I said it was a Specialized in my intro post, but I think the guy who sold it to me said it was from the same factory as Specialized and I only heard what I wanted to hear. Explains why I couldn't find a Specialized Gravity anywhere on their website lol
 

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So I think I've settled on my first upgrade for my bike. Since I've only ever ridden with flat pedals, no toe straps, nothing, everyone says that some sort of attachment to the pedals is a huge boos in efficiency. So I kinda wanna try it! Only one problem, I have absolutely no idea what I'm doing! Could anyone give a recommendation?
The style and type you choose are up to you. There are several good options to choose from.

Bike 101-Clipless Pedals

Something to start with. I happen to use Spd-Sl and use the yellow cleats as they 6* of float vs Red with NO float-dangerous if you ask me :)
 

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I had my doubts about these cleats about 10 years ago, so I bought some low-end Shimano MTB pedals with SPD cleats, got some low-end shoes, and tried them out. It was scary at first, but after practicing un-latching before every stop, I liked them, and now can't live without them. I still have the originals, haven't had any issues yet.

They all work, just a personal preference of what's good. For road bikes, my only recommendation is to find a road-bike compatible pedal that has 2 sides, since 1 side is a pain in the ass for quick starts. MTB pedals have clips on both sides.

Just practice unlatching to create muscle memory of unlatching before stopping, since falling on pavement hurts a lot more than falling on dirt.
 

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I think the issue with clipless pedals is preparation. You are probably going to go over once or twice in learning. Yet you get used to when and how much ahead of a stop you need to unclip. Just make sure your first efforts are in areas with little to no traffic. A rail to trail would be pretty much ideal. If you are lucky, you will go over in front of a 25 year old smoking hot blond that could be a supermodel. After she starts laughing, you ask for her number. You just don't want to go down in heavy traffic. After a few miles, you will have it down pat and it won't be a problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Well Mark, I'll definitely keep your suggestion about falling in front of a hot blonde, but two things have to happen first. #1 my boyfriend and I have to have a HUGE fight and break up, and #2 she has to be a lesbian. But thanks for the advice :p
 

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Well Mark, I'll definitely keep your suggestion about falling in front of a hot blonde, but two things have to happen first. #1 my boyfriend and I have to have a HUGE fight and break up, and #2 she has to be a lesbian. But thanks for the advice :p
LMFAO:D

My suggestion is to go with clipless mtb pedals. They are easier to use than road pedals and you can walk in the shoes. I started off with Shimano SPD's. Shimano style pedals and cleats are among the least expensive of the various interfaces available and are relatively easy to use.
 

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LMFAO:D

They are easier to use than road pedals and you can walk in the shoes.
hop, 9 post until we got to this? You should have used the duck parable, for shame :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
A perfect time to throw this one out there again.
"There was never any cycling career. I was always just a hack with a liver that could withstand copious amounts of liquid punishment. But don’t let that get in the way of a good story…"

Good to see another University of North Dakota grad on a bike! :p

Note to self, don't practice unclipping on my way TO the bike trail.
 

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"There was never any cycling career. I was always just a hack with a liver that could withstand copious amounts of liquid punishment. But don’t let that get in the way of a good story…"

Good to see another University of North Dakota grad on a bike! :p

Note to self, don't practice unclipping on my way TO the bike trail.
He's actually an Aussie. And quite modest.
 

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Check out the Performance Bike brand Forte pedals. They are very inexpensive and I have had no problems with them. They aren't as nice as the Look pedals but you can buy several pairs of Forte pedals for the price of just one set of Look pedals. For shoes go to your LBS and see if they have any 2011 models. I got the Forte pedals and a pair of Shimano shoes for under $100.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Check out the Performance Bike brand Forte pedals. They are very inexpensive and I have had no problems with them. They aren't as nice as the Look pedals but you can buy several pairs of Forte pedals for the price of just one set of Look pedals. For shoes go to your LBS and see if they have any 2011 models. I got the Forte pedals and a pair of Shimano shoes for under $100.
I had been looking on SlickBikes website and been finding some fairly good prices there. But I'll definitely check out performance bike too, I've ordered a couple things from them and have been pretty happy with them!

On a n00b related note. And this may be a dumb question but I'm assuming the cleats come with the pedals?
 

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Forte Carve are double sided MTB pedals from Performance. I paid something like $85 for the pedals and shoes at the store. Definitely worth the investment.
 

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I will throw my 2 cents in here and say again it depends on what type of riding you will be doing. As a commuter I prefer the Forte Campus pedals
Forté Campus Pedals
You will find that most performance road bikers, the go fast road burners, use a Look type of pedal
Look Cycle - Pedals - Road
For mountain biking take a look at the Crank Bros. Egg Beaters
++ eggbeater, mallet, candy, 5050 pedals :: crankbrothers.com ++
Although currently for commuting I use something very differant which is a Power Strap pedal
Power Grips Sport Pedal Kit at REI.com
It all depends on the type of biking you will be doing. Hope I helped more than I confused.
 

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On a diamondframe bike I would use clips, on a twowheeled recumbent I would go for heelstraps and on a trike I would choose clipless, SPD or similar. A problem with shoes is that they have only mounts for the forward position of the cleat, the midfoot position favoured by many triathlons is only found in one shoe, which is handmade, very expensive and of poor quality. This forces people who are moore efficient with midfoot positions to modify primarily racing shoes which are avful to walk in with the cleats attached. There are various platform attachments to use if you want to use "normal" shoes
 

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As a mountain biker new to clipless I am using the forte campus pedals to start. I find that when I am not confident in doing an obstacle....I.e. jumps or riding skinnies high off the ground that I want to be able to ride unclipped and have the option to dump the bike. I think the egg beaters only allow you to ride within your comfort level and not be able to try new things....

Breakdown the type of riding you are going to do and choose from there.
 
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