Two Spoke Forums banner

1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
Rat Biker
Joined
·
432 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have never done a fixie before just curious how are they around hilly country? I'm toying on building one with in the next year. Now I have had single speeds with big cranks and can pretty much ride them up hills, but wondering how hard it is to get used to a fixie. Also about the gearing on them what's the best choice for speed and hill climbing?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
Good question. I'm curious as well. Anyone?
 

·
Total noob (& forum admin)
Joined
·
12,350 Posts
You can choose a gear for speed, or you can choose one for hill climbing, but not both. You're actually going to want a lower gear ratio, for all around use, rather than a higher one.
 

·
Rat Biker
Joined
·
432 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks Hack
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
717 Posts
Couldn't you put a gear on both sides of the wheel and then flip around the back tire...like the old TDF bikes?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
I can def see what is saying. Today I took my Bianchi Pista fixed out for the first time, and damn is it different. I took off down a long neighborhood HILL and it was instant learning curve. Then I loaded the bike up and went to local flat 3.5 mile loop. Well, in my ignorance I saw a buddy and Bam!! Learning curve was instant again. Trying to maintain a usual pace on a fixed gear bike isn't taken lightly, but I can already understand the end benefit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
927 Posts
but I can already understand the end benefit.
Which is what?
I don't get why anyone would not want the ability to change gears depending on terrain...

unless they don't think that's hardcore enough, and need to be different, tougher, more awesome. *rolls eyes*
 

·
Rat Biker
Joined
·
432 Posts
Discussion Starter #9

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
to answer part of your original question that has not been addressed, I'd say it is pretty hard to get used to a fixie. i personally do not own one but in the past weeks have ridden them many times and for the life of me i still cant get past the not being able to just put the left crank down, step, push and swing my leg over. on a fixie the crank will give you a little elevator ride if you try that without putting it horizontal or higher first. otherwise i really liked the feeling and power delivery...but you still need to really pay attention. after riding with a freewheel for 18 or so years i cant see myself ever switching except for short rides. i would hate to get into a sticky traffic situation as i may in NJ and either forget i cant backpedal or level the cranks and coast or end up locking the wheel up and skidding into an accident just because i wanted to save time on maintenance, get better power, etc. i just feel like without MONTHS of regular riding you'll still be at a disadvantage to riding a similarly equipped SS

please keep in mind if you even read this far down my essay here that I am certainly no expert, don't have the experience that many on here do and was never really that cool in middle school...i.e.: this is just my opinion

another valuable consideration is going down hills. even if you do this: [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F0AFpq6jFok&t=2m22s]Macaframa SF Track Bike Promo - YouTube[/ame] im betting those tires will wear out in a jiffy in basically 2 spots assuming you level your cranks alternately when you skid (the position of the rear wheel wont change relative to the position of the cranks)

all in all it seems like a pretty scary proposition to me...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
I have a fixie and I live in the middle of NH's Blue Hills. It is definitely more work to get up the hills but the real challenge is getting down them. It is a great way to even out your pedal stroke and I feel that I get more of a work-out in less time on it, then I do on my road bike. I use it mostly in the winter when I don't want to mess up my road bike and I won't be out for as long. Above all it is fun, fun, fun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Hello All,

I just bought a single speed bike. I am putting a fixed gear on it. Fixed gear bikes are track bikes. I am also building a totally fixed gear bike that I bought from Nashbar. I bought the frame and I have to get ALL of the parts. Fixed gear riding is fun. I live near Trenton and there are not too many hills. Single speed works fine but I don't like the brake cables. I have never ridden a fixed gear bike but once my lockring arrives I will start. Some cyclists train on fixed gear bikes because of the need for constant pedaling.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
1,804 Posts
I have gearing of 63, 66, 69, and 73 inches. I rarely use the 63. I can climb faily well in the 66, a fair amount of 8% grades for example. You just get used to it.
 

·
tall old member
Joined
·
1,300 Posts
A guy on a fixie did the last MS-150 I did. This was Escape To The Lake, a very hilly ride in western Pensylvania. He made it but said he would choose a different bike the next time, it was tough.
 

·
still learning
Joined
·
3,610 Posts
i just don't understand why you would want a fixed gear. no freewheel to relax or a down hill seems odd to me. seems like an accident waiting to happen
 

·
retromike3
Joined
·
274 Posts
fixed OK by me

The reason to go with a fixed is that it is very simple. there are only a few moving parts and because of that they don't have to weigh that much.

over twenty years ago I built my first track bike and it weighed less than sixteen pounds. that was with a steel Tange tube set and columbus lugs with Campy track ends. I am still riding that biker today (its on my trainer were I go nowhere fast).

I used to work at a art department where the boss had a big sign on his desk and it said "KEEP IT SIMPLE, STUPID!" That's a good point to remember if you reduce the complexity, things tend to keep working. If I'm still alive in twenty years will the new 11 speed electronic shifters still be working? I don't think so.

mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
418 Posts
to answer part of your original question that has not been addressed, I'd say it is pretty hard to get used to a fixie. i personally do not own one but in the past weeks have ridden them many times and for the life of me i still cant get past the not being able to just put the left crank down, step, push and swing my leg over. on a fixie the crank will give you a little elevator ride if you try that without putting it horizontal or higher first. otherwise i really liked the feeling and power delivery...but you still need to really pay attention. after riding with a freewheel for 18 or so years i cant see myself ever switching except for short rides. i would hate to get into a sticky traffic situation as i may in NJ and either forget i cant backpedal or level the cranks and coast or end up locking the wheel up and skidding into an accident just because i wanted to save time on maintenance, get better power, etc. i just feel like without MONTHS of regular riding you'll still be at a disadvantage to riding a similarly equipped SS

please keep in mind if you even read this far down my essay here that I am certainly no expert, don't have the experience that many on here do and was never really that cool in middle school...i.e.: this is just my opinion

another valuable consideration is going down hills. even if you do this: Macaframa SF Track Bike Promo - YouTube im betting those tires will wear out in a jiffy in basically 2 spots assuming you level your cranks alternately when you skid (the position of the rear wheel wont change relative to the position of the cranks)

all in all it seems like a pretty scary proposition to me...

Ah....Dat ain't nuttin....I could prolly do that! LOL :D :p :D

PS.

Nice video, Kyle! :)
 

·
still learning
Joined
·
3,610 Posts
The reason to go with a fixed is that it is very simple. there are only a few moving parts and because of that they don't have to weigh that much.
yes but all the old school bmx bikes are still going and they are not fixed gear. i just am having a hard time understanding why you want the pedals to keep moving all the time, even if you are going down a hill or want to take a break and coast. you cannot coast on long fun hills so you are limited to your top speed.

i don;t know, i guess i would have to try one out. i just can't get my mind around always pedaling and if you stop pedaling, you stop riding.
 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
Top