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Discussion Starter #1
The Local LBS said that forks are somewhat universal. There are about 4 different "fits". I was wondering If anyone would be able to tell me if one of those would fit a wellington 2.0? Here is a link to the bike http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/windsor/wellington2_IX.htm The fork they have listed says its a DuraForte TaperBlade CroMoly. Which to me is spanish.

Any help would be greatly appreciated. Any one of you ever replaced a fork? Does it take a lot or could someone with a decent amount of mechanical skill figure it?
 

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By looking at the pictures you need a 1" threaded fork. Its best to also match the angle of your existing fork so you dont overly change the geometry of the bike. Unforturnately BD specs dont offer much info. I am going by the picture of the bike.
 

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Forks come in a few standard varieties, with the technical difference being the steerer tube. That's the bit that goes through your frame, and interfaces with your stem.

Steerer tubes can either be threaded, with a quill type stem (as used on the Windsor) rides inside the steerer, and a headset that's threaded onto the frame. They can also be threadless, where the stem clamps to the outside of the steerer, and the entire headset is press fit only. To complicate matters, they are either 1", or 1-1/8". Yes, there are a few other sizes, but those the common ones. Most modern mountain bikes and non-steel road bikes will be 1-1/8', which department store bikes, X-Mart bikes, and some current steel road bikes are 1".

I'll let that sink in while I get some work done. Maybe someone can post examples of them before I get back.
 

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Oh, that appears to be a threaded 1" on the Windsor. As mentioned already, you need to match the rake - basically, the distance between the front axle and a line drawn through the head tube. Too much or too little will make your bike handle sluggish or squirrely.
 

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Oh, that appears to be a threaded 1" on the Windsor. As mentioned already, you need to match the rake - basically, the distance between the front axle and a line drawn through the head tube. Too much or too little will make your bike handle sluggish or squirrely.

Rake is the term I was looking for. I was dumbfounded between rake and trail. Your LBS will be able to match that up for you. May I ask why you are replacing your fork?
 

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You may run into a problem with is the lenght of the steerer tube. It may need to be cut to fit. You may also have to remove the bottom bearing race and press it onto the new steerer tube. Having a failure on the front end of your bike could be fatal to say the least. If you are not sure after suggestions are made the LBS is not that expensive.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yeah I was thinking of just getting it done by the LBS because that seems a little bit more than I can chew. The reason? I found a Brand new wellington 2.0 that was used once or twice. He had it on top of his car and then he drove into the garage...bending the fork. So I was going to go take a look at it and see how bad the damage is. Checking to make sure it just bent the fork and not the frame etc.
 

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Well consider the price of the bike and the price of the repair. You may be able to get a brand new one from BD for about the same money.
 

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My best advice would be to run in the opposite direction of that bike. I'm pretty doubtful of wrecking a fork without damaging the frame.

If he crashed it, that might be different. But on a roof rack? Since you didn't mention front wheel damage, I'm picturing a fork clamp, and the back wheel in a channel. That's probably some ugly forces on that frame.
 

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My best advice would be to run in the opposite direction of that bike. I'm pretty doubtful of wrecking a fork without damaging the frame.

If he crashed it, that might be different. But on a roof rack? Since you didn't mention front wheel damage, I'm picturing a fork clamp, and the back wheel in a channel. That's probably some ugly forces on that frame.
I tend to agree with IndustryHack in that the head tube where the fork goes through the frame could well be stressed, ovalised or bent out of shape from an impact like that. Be very careful what you decide to do with that one.
 
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