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Do you guys and gals do your own maintence work , like adjusting brakes and shifters ,changing brake pads and so on , or do you have someone at a bike shop do it for you. How would I learn to do these things myself.

Seems to be kind of a hassle to take it the whole way up to the bike store for a simple adjustment.
 

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I've learned to do brake/shifter adjustments, brake pads, tire changes, stem/handlebar changes, all on my own, and the Park Tool website that Industry Hack refers to is a huge help.

I know when I'm in over my head and to take the bike to a pro however :)
 

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Yesterday tired old man, Today retired old man
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I got the Zinn book for X-Mass realy good book thanks for the tip Hack.
 

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The Park Tools website covers just about everything for the DIY cyclist. If you're old school like me, and prefer an actual book, check this thread.
Hack, thanks for the info on the Parks Tool's site. I had no idea.

I have a 2nd edition of Lennard's book. Copyright 1996... wow didn't realize I'd had it that long. The vast majority of the book still seems relevant though. Probably worth getting a new copy though.
 

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The new book covers a lot, much more than even I need. But that makes it an even better investment, as it may take another 15 years before it's anywhwere near obsolete. And thanks for reminding me that my MTB is ten years old. Oddly, of the half dozen or so bikes floating around my house, none of them have terribly new technology.
 

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Presently, it goes to the shop. But, I really want to learn to do the basics on it as it's a pain to put it on the car to take it and all.
 

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Sheldon Brown's site (RIP) is an excellent source of info as is Park's site as mentioned. I like the Park book, I prefer to read it rather than watch a video, but that's just me. A good, solid online forum like this is worth its weight in gold for stuff like you are asking about. If you really want to get crazy (like I am in the Fall), head to a school for maintenance, I'm probably going to head to United for 3 and a half weeks for everything form basic assembly all the way to suspension and (my goal) frame building.

Don't be shy to work on your bike, but at the same time take your time and observe what you're doing. Nothing on a bike (minus some pedals and Mark's seat post) need any great amount of force. I'd also get the best tools you can afford, a cheap tool is more dangerous than a good tool. DAMHIK.
 

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Knee I would add one more thing. Think before you tweak. I am never shy about twisting a screw or bolt, if I have an understanding of what is happening. I always leave myself an out though. Never bang, hit or bend anything unless you are absolutely certain of what you are doing and why. You tube has some great demonstrations on how things come out and go back together. Yet you never want to do anything to your bike that you local pro wrench can not undo, unless you are absolutely certain you know what you are doing. Tweak on the adjustments and learn, but you know there a pro wrench can always bail you out later. Bend on a derailleur, and you very well may be buying one.

I would add one more thing. When you get frustrated, mad, po'ed or any other state other than calm, walk away. Rushed, mad or aggravation can make you make mistakes that a good wrench can not fix without it getting expensive. Sometimes it makes more sense to get a pro wrench than a tool from a monetary standpoint, but then again we are not keeping balance sheets on our bikes. (at least most of us are not)
 

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I agree wholeheartedly. When I was 17, with a hot car, I went to put a new K&N filter into the intake system. I was frustrated since it was early July and hot and sunny. I wasn't thinking straight because I was frustrated and didn't see that I was putting it in upside down. Eventually from pressing and twisting, I actually broke the ABS plastic intake. A few hundred dollars later and I was up and running. I learned a VERY valuable lesson that day.

Bikes have some fragile components as mentioned, and the cost can be expensive. I would always think and observe what you're about to do. Start with basic stuff like pads and cables and work your way up. It's been mentioned here before, there are a TON of resources available. As a side note, if you do need a pro wrench, some will let you observe while they work. Just thank them with a 6 pack.
 

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Do you guys and gals do your own maintence work , like adjusting brakes and shifters ,changing brake pads and so on , or do you have someone at a bike shop do it for you. How would I learn to do these things myself.

Seems to be kind of a hassle to take it the whole way up to the bike store for a simple adjustment.
Yes, to doing your own maintenance. Having knowledge of basic bicycle repair is an invaluable skill. There is no AAA for bicycles. If you get a flat tire, ya gotta fix it yourself or you're walkin'.

As previously mentioned, the Park site and Sheldon Brown's are both great sources of info. Th Park site has a "Bike Map" where you just point your cursor to the area of the bike that need work and click on what you need. It gives you step by step instructions and tells you what tools are needed.

Happy wrenching!
 
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