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There's a rider Stacy Sims, PhD out here in the SF Bay Area that did a great talk on heat acclimation. She's worked with the Garmin boys at the Tour, and has great info. Shes the person who turned on to nuun effectively ending MTB race cramps.

Her presentation included a really cool thermogenic imaging video of the Leadville running race. They were able to accurately predict the top ten based on how the runners were dissipating heat.

If I can't dig it up, I will contact her directly for it. Really good stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Integrate: Thanks for that info, in particular, mentioning the product Nuun. I hadn't heard of it and I'll try to research it. Their website shows that they manufacture 3 different products for different applications.

Endurolytes are pretty similar to Nuun The biggest difference that I see is that Endurolytes uses a Chelate version of it's electrolytes whereas Nuun uses a bicarbonate (or carbonate or sulfate) version of their electrolytes.

Not being a biological chemist I looked up the difference and found the following: "Magnesium chelated with amino acids is probably the most absorbable form. Less
absorbable forms include magnesium bicarbonate, magnesium oxide, and magnesium
carbonate. Magnesium oxide is probably somewhat better than magnesium carbonate
(dolomite). The newly available salts of magnesium aspartate or citrate, both known as mineral transporters, have a better percentage of absorption." (source: )

This makes me lean toward Endurolytes over Nuun, but Nuun could be equal or superior. I would love to see a double blind randomized test on the two products for heat stress applications.
 

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Trying the two, nuun has worked better for me individually. I know other people who swear by endurolytes and salt sticks. I've also had nutritionist say your diet can be just as effective for making sure your mineral levels are topped off eliminating the need for endurolytes/salt sticks/sport legs/etc for shorter races like crits, stxc, tt's and xco's. There's also absorbtion rates into the muscles to take into consideration as well. Again, all individual.

IMHO, experiment in yourself. If capsules work for you time after time, stay with the girl you brought. Of they don't, check your nutrition off the bike, and keep playing with different combinations until you find the one that works.

The other thing that Stacy mentioned was nuun for the first hour on a ride, and the Hammer Heed + nuun after that for the remainder of the ride.

That way on top of the electrolytes in the nuun, you are getting carbohydrates (primarily maltodextrin) in the Heed. Another reason this works for me is Heed is gluten free. I've got a sensitivity to gluten so this is perfect.

From what I've seen, you can get 10 different riders each using their own strategy, and What may work for one rider, may not transfer over to the others.
 

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The other thing that us often overlooked as a causal factor in cramping is the length tension relationships of your muscles. If they aren't aligned/strength is off they have the potential to overwork which will cause faster fatigue, and increase the potential you will cramp.

Plus, if you get dehydrated, your discs are affected from the standpoint of being more prone to spinal flexion position reducing nerve capacity. Dean Somerset gets into this quite a bit in his "Post Rehab Essentials" seminar. Great info!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks everybody for your comments. From this forum and several others I have adopted many of your comments and added them to the article resulting in an estimated 21.23% improvement. I appreciate your comments. Stay cool everybody!



Cheers,

Dave
 

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DavidHenderson said:
Thanks everybody for your comments. From this forum and several others I have adopted many of your comments and added them to the article resulting in an estimated 21.23% improvement. I appreciate your comments. Stay cool everybody!

Cheers,

Dave
That's awesome! Well done. Where can we find the article?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Some key helpful points (I just added a few new elements)
1. allow yourself some exposure to exercising in the heat (with common sense limitations) and allow time (see post for specifics) for adaptive response to occur (primarily plasma volume increases)
2. Hydrate properly and add electrolytes appropriately. Drinking large amounts of straight/standard water can make you very sick from electrolyte imbalances (Water intoxication is caused when sodium levels drop below 135 mmol/L when athletes consume large amounts of fluid.).
3. keep your clothing wet (in particular your hair on your head (if bald, a dew rag can hold water), jersey and front panels of shorts. Water conducts (transfers) heat 25 times more than air; evaporation removes the heat that has been captured in the water. This is a really big deal for cooling. As an illustration: Tests done with canteens covered with water soaked fabric covering versus canteens with dry fabric covers produced a 42 Fahrenheit degree difference of interior water temperature (23.4 degrees Celsius difference). evaporative cooling effects on water containers. .
4. Cooling yourself by pre-wetting clothing and dumping water on your body during strenuous exercise helps slow dehydration and loss of electrolytes, because you will sweat a lesser amount.
5. Ice slurries can temporarily lower a person's core temperature and increase stay time in heat stress environment.
6. something, something, I forget what number six was.

Stay wet my friends,
Regards,
David Henderson
 

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Great info.
With the heat pouring on, it would do us all well to take something from this info., if it isn't already known.
 

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Great info, and again thanks for sharing.

I use to live in the Mojave Desert Area of California so I know about heat but there was quite a bit there I didn't know and neither did the RAAM team that resided up there from which I got my info from.

The only thing I could add to all of this, and this is for the non-racer, is to wear a slightly looser jersey (not so loose that you resemble a flag waving!) instead of skin tight form fitting ones. I found the loose fitting ones to be significantly cooler then the tight fitting ones; and of course I always bought white.

The tight fitting jersey offers aerodynamic advantages of the looser fitting ones, so for racing you don't have a choice, but for the fitness/recreational an maybe even for training rides looser fitting jersey does help with heat.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
The following is a section that I just recently added that is both interesting and valuable to know regarding heat management:

"The reason for wetting your clothing is that water is 25 times more conductive than air, and as the water evaporates from your clothing/skin, the captured heat is removed with the water. (cooling towers efficiently cool large buildings using these principles). As an illustration of the effectiveness of evaporative cooling, consider the results from the following simple test done with canteens covered with water soaked fabric covering versus canteens with dry fabric covers with only 3 hours of temperature exposure:
Starting Water Temperature (both containers): 74 degrees F
Air Temperature: Varied; between 98 and 101 degrees F
Ground Temperature (in direct sunlight): 119 degrees
Water in Plain Canteen after three Hours in Sun: 117 degrees
Water in Canteen with wet cover, hung in sun but in breeze: 75 degrees

Evaporative cooling produced a 42 Fahrenheit degree difference in the interior water temperatures (23.4 degrees Celsius difference)! Now imagine that the water inside the canteen is your blood and vital organs. The rate of evaporation is greatly increased as you bicycle because you create air currents that constantly lower the vapor pressure at the immediate surface area of the water. Wind plus water equals cooling. Pre-wetting your clothing can temporarily save (or extend) body fluids and can increase your stay-time to exhaustion during a heat stress event."

Regards,
David Henderson
 
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