Helmets

Discussion in 'Beginners Forum' started by jacksmom97, Sep 9, 2010.

  1. jacksmom97

    jacksmom97 jacksmom97

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    Would anyone recommend buying a helmet online...without trying it on? I found one on Performance website....got great reviews and it is onsale and relatively inexpensive...I have tried on bike helmets before and I am always the same size...does the fit have to be perfect? Thanks in advance for ya'lls advice...
     
  2. Engyo

    Engyo Bent Newbie - old rider

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    Most decent bike helmets are adjustable, to an extent. That said, I hope you've tried on one from that manufacturer before. If you have then size accordingly and you should be fine.
     

  3. photosbymark

    photosbymark New Member

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    Well if you can, just go to the store and try it on. Performance is a chain and you may find the same deal locally. I am not sure if there is a Performance bike up there, but if not another local bike store might carry the same brand.

    Try it on, and if the price is close, spend a few extra bucks and support local cycle shops and buy it locally. If its a big difference, the buy something else you need, and then buy the helmet online. Check return policy though. Many might take it back if it doesn't fit for some reason, but know before you buy.

    Good luck
     
  4. froze

    froze Banned

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    You need to try on the helmet before buying it. Here's a web site that will show you how to see if it will fit: Easy Steps to Properly Fit a Bicycle Helmet
    The only thing I would add to that site is another area of fitting they don't mention and that's side to side movement. You need to, gently unless your sadistic, slap the side of the helmet to see if it feels like it could come off, it won't of course because it's strapped on, but excessive movement is bad. If you slap it and it feels like it's staying secure then buy that one if it fits all the other requirements on the site I gave you. But don't try to buy on the internet then send it back if it doesn't fit, because some places charge a return shipping fee so you'll lose any savings you may have thought you were getting.
     
  5. photosbymark

    photosbymark New Member

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    Speaking of helmets, just curious if anyone knows what Snell requires (other than submitting to testing) that isn't required by any other helmet???
     
  6. kourt

    kourt New Member

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    It is always a must to try a helmet on before buying it. Or else, how would you know if the helmet will fit you or not, right? If you are interested in buying the helmet online, you can go to a local bike shop first and see if the helmet being sold online is available in the shop. If it is, you can try it on and see if it fits well for you.

    If you buy that helmet online without trying it on, you might just waste your money no matter how inexpensive it is. And of course, perfect fit of the helmet is one way to ensure that the helmet will provide you safety during your cycling.
     
  7. froze

    froze Banned

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    It's all very confusing to say the least. Supposedly the toughest and latest safety test is done by Snell rating B95 while an earlier out of date rating was B90 (the digits stand for the year of the rating). So I go on line to find a helmet with the B95 rating, I find a two no name helmets costing $20 from China that have that "superior" rating...thats it! No big name companies even had a Snell rating no matter the price! Then I look at real expensive helmets, and the one that seemed to have the most protection was the Specialized S Works that cost $229 but has an internal kevlar "roll cage" and it's not rated by Snell at all! It Makes one wonder what hell is going on with these ratings.

    And again it seems that the only heads worth protecting to the fullest are those that can dish out $229 for a helmet, the rest of you who can't afford that kind of helmet are just poor beggars and should just die, your not worth the spit you just spat on the ground.
     
  8. photosbymark

    photosbymark New Member

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    Snell is big in racing and motorcycles, and in fact when I checked into autocross they won't let you on track unless you have a Snell approved helmet. It's not required by anyone other than racing sanctioning bodies in motorsports that I know of, but if I rode a motorcycle Id have one. With motorcycles and the speeds involved as well as the expense its silly not to. Spend 20 grand on a motorcycle and $70 for a helmet. One motorcycle friend told me those are fine if you have a $70 head.

    Cycling is a bit different. Speeds are lower and spending $229 for a helmet to ride a $300 bike isn't going to happen that often. I know the CPSC tests all helmets to a set standard and all helmets have to pass regardless of cost. Just wondered how those tests compared to the Snell
     
  9. awinter

    awinter No longer a newb!

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    Snell and other ratings are for motorcycle and mopeds only. There isn't a regulatory agency mandating safety standards for cycling helmets such as D.O.T. (Department of Transportation). See below for information on motorcycle helmet safety ratings ... (blue text).

    The following link to the Bicycle Helmet Safety Institute has information strictly for bicycle helmets. >>> Bicycle Helmets for the 2010 Season <<<


    All motorcycle crash helmets, including novelty motorcycle helmets, have to be approved by the United States Department of Transportation. Find more information about this law below.

    Approved Helmets

    Helmet laws have been created to maximize the safety of all motorcycle and bike riders and their passengers.

    According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), fatal motorcycle crashes have risen 50% since the late 90’s. This has resulted in an approximate 3,181 crashes last year.

    It’s for this reasons that strict helmet laws are now in place. Let’s take a look at the organizations that have set the standards for helmet models:

    DOT
    SNELL
    FMVSS


    The United States Department of Transportation (DOT) has researched helmet safety in conjunction with the National Highway Safety Administration.

    From this research a set of standards and specifications for helmet production has been created. Manufacturers need to adhere to these standards or they cannot gain the DOT seal of approval on their helmets.

    This DOT seal of approval is something to look for when shopping for motorcycle helmets, as not all helmets will have one.

    DOT works in conjunction with the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) 218. This act covers helmet laws on the road, which we reviewed earlier.

    Finally, the SNELL Foundation is a worldwide leader in helmet safety standards, offering motorcycle helmet reviews on their web site.

    Look for the Label

    Finding a DOT symbol on your helmet means that you have found the highest quality motorcycle helmet available.

    Look for the label that will provide vital information, like manufacturer brand, model designation, size, date of manufacture and the DOT symbol.

    The DOT label means that many safety precautions have been considered upon the manufacture of your motorcycle helmet. For instance, you will find 1 inch of polyfoam inner lining, a riveted chin strap, and limited protrusions on the outside of the helmet.

    e Snell Memorial Foundation is an additional certification source intended to provide testing standards and "Snell" certification to a different standard than FMVSS 218. The Snell standards don't replace the DOT standards; meeting Snell standards is completely voluntary. All motorcycle helmets sold in the U.S.A. must be DOT "certified", in that they must have gone through the proper procedures in a certified testing lab to meet DOT standards for motorcycle helmets, but they are not required to be Snell certified.

    A motorcycle helmet that carries both DOT and Snell standards may have gone through different testing schemes, but may not necessarily be superior to helmets that meets the DOT standard. There is some controversy over standards and testing, and it gets even more complicated if you consider the European ECE 22.05 standard.

    See also the new SHARP motorcycle helmet rating system used in the UK.
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2010
  10. froze

    froze Banned

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    Yes cycling is different, but why? because helmets aren't required by law on adults over 18? That would be a nonsense answer since in a lot of states helmets are not required on motorcycle riders either over 18.

    I think it goes back to the fees Snell charges, it almost's hints at a mafia protection racket! You pay us and we'll give you the rating. Makes you wonder why almost all if not all American and European bicycle helmet makers don't buy the Snell rating, it makes you wonder if they know something about Snell that we don't.

    Like I said earlier you can't tell me that a cheap no name Chinese $20 helmet with the Snell rating is safer then a Specialized S Works $229 helmet without the rating.

    I'm going to send an e-mail to Specialized and ask them why they don't subscribe to the latest Snell 95 Rating instead of the updated 95, yet a $20 Chinese model does and see if I get a response; if I do I'll post here.
     
  11. awinter

    awinter No longer a newb!

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    FYI - Snell is still only a benchmark as it's not the official testing methodology. The Department of Transportation (DOT) is the only official testing requirement by Federal Law. A helmet can have a Snell rating, but if it doesn't have a DOT, it won't be accepted as legal.

    Also, keep in mind that you are kind of comparing apples and oranges when associating motorcycle helmets with bicycle helmets. Both have vary different requirements as to providing for the safety of the rider. I say this as an avid motorcyclist and also a bicycle rider. Look at the difference between road, mountain and downhill helmets as well as skate boarding.
     
  12. awinter

    awinter No longer a newb!

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    Can a moderator lock this thread as I believe the OP has received an answer to the original question. cheers!

    [​IMG]
     
  13. froze

    froze Banned

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    Why do you care? You don't have to continue reading it, and you can delete in your mailbox without ever having to open it and read it. cheers!
     
  14. photosbymark

    photosbymark New Member

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    True Snell isn't required, but comparing the Snell standard to the DOT it's night an day. Snell FAR exceeds DOT requirements. You see DOT on Snell helmets anyway. As far as legality, where I am if you are I think its 18, there is no requirement to wear a helmet at all on a motorcycle.

    What I was hoping to find out is just how much higher the Snell standard is on a bicycle vs the CPSC standard on everyone else.
     
  15. froze

    froze Banned

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    According to Bell, the new CPSC certification has the same tests that Snell B95 is. That's why Bell and a slew of other manufactures decided this year to opt out of the Snell certification. Bell sent me a PDF file on this, but not being computer literate I can't copy it to the notepad then paste it here.
     
  16. photosbymark

    photosbymark New Member

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    Makes more sense why there are not more of them with Snell on it. Too bad. I have a lot more trust in anything coming from Snell. Hopefully Snell will come up with a new bike standard, just as they update the standard on all the other products. The motorcycle just came out with a 2010 standard. The Special Activities SA (racing) standard for 2010 should be out soon too, but hopefully Snell won't just phase out bicycle testing. From a business standpoint it might make sense though
     
  17. froze

    froze Banned

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    Supposedly Snell charge the helmet manufactures a lot of money to get those stickers, and bicycle helmet manufactures frowned it, that's why a lot of helmet makers before CPSC changed their testing just went with CPSC and not Bell; now that CPSC changed it to meet or exceed the Snell the few manufactures that were using the Bell left.
     
  18. trx1

    trx1 New Member

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    most helmets i find here are in the $30 range. as long as it saves me head, im all 4 it!