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Two skinny J's
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Do I have your attention now? I just created this little spot where I'd like to see....well your maintenance tips, tricks and routines
 
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spin... spin.. spin
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Best trick I know that is simple but for some reason no one seems know about. The owner of the shop I work at showed me this and I had never seen it nor have I ever seen it since from anyone else. It is far to simple for him to be the only one who does it. Or maybe it is so simple others just never thought of it. Has to do with setting up and getting a tubeless tire to bead on a difficult rim/tire combo. Sometimes even with an air compressor a tire just won’t bead. When that happens this is far quicker than soap and straps and other crazy things. When you don’t have a compressor this is a life saver.

1) Put a tube in the tire.

2) Air it up until it beads all the way on both sides.

3) Let out air slowly so tire stays beaded.

4) Carefully break the bead loose on only one side of tire. Use tire lever and open up to access tube while leaving opposing side of tire still beaded to the rim.

5) Remove tube.

6) Insert tubeless valve stem and tighten valve stem nut to rim.

7) With the one side still beaded reinstall tire on rim.

8) Add air with valve core removed until the one side that is not beaded beads up.

9) Add liquid sealant via valve stem.

10) Replace valve core and add air to personal preference.

This principle is super simple. Once one side of a tubeless tire is beaded on a tubeless rim it takes far less air to bead the remaining side. To the point that by using a tube to bead the tire and leaving one side beaded, when removing the tube it makes it easy enough to bead the other side using even a small hand pump. Track pump is super easy.
 

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Spin Spin Spin
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$100 savings vs it being done at shop.......IF you already have the strips and the sealant. I do not so I will let shop gouge me while they are rebuilding Manitou fork with my box of upgrade parts......this time, lol....great tip tho.
 

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Keep a few dollars in your seat bag.
If you’re on a long ride and need a drink or bite to eat, you’ll be thankful for it, but the main reason is to temporarily fix a sidewall split (not for tubeless).
I’ve used this twice and both times it was because i wasn’t paying attention and clipped a gravel and pinched the tire, splitting the sidewall and tube.

Take a folded and place it in the tire at the split. Put the tube in and inflate.
This will let you ride home with your head held high and you can get another tire from stock and get back out there.

Twice was enough for me. Now, i almost always carry an old tire folded in my jersey, just in case it happens again and I’m 50 miles from home.
 

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Spin Spin Spin
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3,902 Posts
foil packaged enegy snacks of some sort also handy instead of money to fix a split.
 

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Two skinny J's
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21,324 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Best trick I know that is simple but for some reason no one seems know about. The owner of the shop I work at showed me this and I had never seen it nor have I ever seen it since from anyone else. It is far to simple for him to be the only one who does it. Or maybe it is so simple others just never thought of it. Has to do with setting up and getting a tubeless tire to bead on a difficult rim/tire combo. Sometimes even with an air compressor a tire just won’t bead. When that happens this is far quicker than soap and straps and other crazy things. When you don’t have a compressor this is a life saver.

1) Put a tube in the tire.

2) Air it up until it beads all the way on both sides.

3) Let out air slowly so tire stays beaded.

4) Carefully break the bead loose on only one side of tire. Use tire lever and open up to access tube while leaving opposing side of tire still beaded to the rim.

5) Remove tube.

6) Insert tubeless valve stem and tighten valve stem nut to rim.

7) With the one side still beaded reinstall tire on rim.

8) Add air with valve core removed until the one side that is not beaded beads up.

9) Add liquid sealant via valve stem.

10) Replace valve core and add air to personal preference.

This principle is super simple. Once one side of a tubeless tire is beaded on a tubeless rim it takes far less air to bead the remaining side. To the point that by using a tube to bead the tire and leaving one side beaded, when removing the tube it makes it easy enough to bead the other side using even a small hand pump. Track pump is super easy.
I had never thought of doing it this way. I've always used Co2 on both road and MTB. Either I've been lucky or...who knows. I know that's no the most environmentally friendly way of doing it but it's fast and efficient :D

Obviously I don't see the volume and variety of tires and wheels a shop does but it's never let me down.
 
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Old, fat, and slow
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Best trick I know that is simple but for some reason no one seems know about. The owner of the shop I work at showed me this and I had never seen it nor have I ever seen it since from anyone else. It is far to simple for him to be the only one who does it. Or maybe it is so simple others just never thought of it. Has to do with setting up and getting a tubeless tire to bead on a difficult rim/tire combo. Sometimes even with an air compressor a tire just won’t bead. When that happens this is far quicker than soap and straps and other crazy things. When you don’t have a compressor this is a life saver.

1) Put a tube in the tire.

2) Air it up until it beads all the way on both sides.

3) Let out air slowly so tire stays beaded.

4) Carefully break the bead loose on only one side of tire. Use tire lever and open up to access tube while leaving opposing side of tire still beaded to the rim.

5) Remove tube.

etc
I was planning to make a three-liter bottle into an high-volume high-speed inflation tool (what (shrapnel) could possibly go wrong) but this is so much simpler and safer.

You have enriched my life (albeit in a pretty small and specific way,) so thank you.

Of course, I have opted Not to run tubeless on my tubeless-ready wheels because of hassles with inflation ..... hmmmm .....
 

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I put electrical tape on the sidewalls of my rims before I glue my tubulars because I’m horrible with getting the last bit of the tire onto the rim without getting glue everywhere.
 

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Two skinny J's
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I put electrical tape on the sidewalls of my rims before I glue my tubulars because I’m horrible with getting the last bit of the tire onto the rim without getting glue everywhere.
Now that's dedication.
 

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Two skinny J's
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21,324 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
More like something I have to do because I suck at it😀
I should have been more specific, what I meant was that's some dedication to run that setup :D How does that work with a flat out on the road? I'm thinking that's gota be worse than tubeless and dealing with that mess :D Never had a flat on road tubeless setup but...I've pushed a mtb back home :D
 
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