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Sorry to say, but I doubt a bike like this is worth much of anything. Do you know anything about the frame, what kind of tubing and method of joining the tubes? Someone might want it to turn it into a fixie. In which case you might be able to get a 50 or so dollars for it. Something worth considering is donating it to an organization that fixes up used bikes for underprivileged kids. Here are a couple of sites you could check out if you decide to go that route.


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Recycling Bicycles: Donating Used Bikes and Parts, Finding Pre-owed Bikes *& International Bicycle Recycling Programs
 

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I like the older Trek bikes, good buys for us because they are under valued so. I have bought fine Treks made with 531 and 501 tubes for under $250 for training bikes. I have to say these bikes after I upgrade with good components do bring the cost of the bike up. The new Aluminum bikes being made now are so very good now, it's hard for me not to want those too.
 

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All older bikes made for the American market had 27" wheels...their not deal breakers, the bike could be the deal breaker, not the wheels. A Schwinn Paramount from the 70's is worth a lot of money and came with 27" wheels, so lets just dump it in the trash! There are people that want the bikes to be original and don't want some 700c wheel set that didn't come with the bike on the bike, or some other non stock modification. Tires in 27" also are not difficult to find except in the 3/4ths widths.

Having said all of that crap, Trek never made a bike model SIS, they all used a series of 3 numbers back in the day of 27" wheels. Trek did make a 515, it use Ishwata 022 lugged tubing, and Suntour VxGT rear derailleur that worked like a champ among other Suntour and Dia Comp parts. The 515 is a mid level sport bike (frame geometry between that of a racing and a touring frame), so it was a decent bike but that bike came with 700c wheels. So I'm confused as to what a SIS is. I do think though that 1986 or 87 was the last year that any Trek bike came with 27" rims, so the bike has to be older then that.
 

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SIS is Shimano Indexing Shift, but he says it's got Suntour, so it doesn't sound like it's in original condition. And while some steel Treks are valued as touring bikes, this isn't one of them. Which brings me back to my original comment - a run of the mill road bike old enough to have 27" wheels is probably not worth much.
 

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SIS is Shimano Indexing Shift, but he says it's got Suntour, so it doesn't sound like it's in original condition. And while some steel Treks are valued as touring bikes, this isn't one of them. Which brings me back to my original comment - a run of the mill road bike old enough to have 27" wheels is probably not worth much.
You may be right about the SIS, but I don't recall any Trek bikes made prior to 87 that said SIS on the frame...for that matter even after 87, but I could be wrong-it wouldn't be the first time.

But just because the bike has 27" wheels doesn't make it a run of the mill cheap piece of junk. In fact Trek's TX 709 in the 70's was their 2nd from the best they offered came with 27" wheels, then later in the early 80's their top of the line touring bikes came with 27" wheels and the top was the 720 fetching over $500 on E-Bay for an average condition one. And this Paramount would get way over $1000 and it came with 27": http://www.schwinnbikeforum.com/SLDB/Images/XLite/1978/78xlite04b.jpg
 

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Froze, you are old enough and knowledgeable enough about bikes to know that certain older bikes have some collector value. This just doesn't sound like one of them. SIS came out in 1984, so if the Trek in question was indeed equipped with it, that's a starting point for determining the year. Of course, the OP could just post a photo or two...

My Univega has 27" Araya rims, and came with a Suntour drivetrain. After stripping it down, it's still sitting while I decide if it's worth replacing the tires/tubes and some various drivetrain components, plus brakes. If I shop carefully, I can complete it (less paint) for $100, but I'm not even sure it would be worth that when done. Ironically, if I go the cheap route and convert it to single speed, I could probably get more.
 

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I don't know which Univega model you have, but they did make so really nice bikes, they had two or three models with the name Super at the beginning of the model name that were very high quality bikes as was the Competizone model (which I saw one of these go on EBay for $1,100!); there's a Aerodynamic model right now on E-Bay at $800 and a lower end Nuova Sport trying to get $450 ( I would be surprised it sells since others on E-bay are below $200).

Depending on which model you have I wouldn't convert it to a fixie, but at least I know that if you did you seem like the type of person that would keep the original parts so someone or you could convert it back. Most people throw away the original parts, and if the bike is a bit classic it ruins the originality of the bike. But keep in mind, I have a small collection of classic cars and because of my mindset with stuff like that, I'm not into bastardizing a car or a bike if I feel they have value. I did bastardizing a 79 Chevy Z28, but the work I did on it actually made the car worth more then being in original condition, but I also kept the original engine/transmission in storage if someone wanted to put back if I ever sell the car. A couple of the older cars I have the only things I did was replace the points with a Pertronics electronic point system and replace the filters with K&N, the other even older cars I left completely stock. You also know the bikes I own and while there's nothing worth big money like a vintage Colnago, I still wouldn't bastardize one. But again that's just me, I'm into preserving the originality of stuff as much as possible.
 

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I've got the Nuovo Sport. My neighbor paid $25 for it, rode it for a few months, then donated it to me as a project, which I won't have time for until it's too cold for playing outside. If the drivetrain is not salvageable, it won't get fixed, only single speed. The original parts look pretty rough, but I will save them anyway.
 

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I still regret getting rid of my old Univega Gran Premio. The frame was of Japanese manufactured Tange steel. It had a beautiful sparkly blue paint job. It had Suntour derailers with these funny down tube shifters that when you shifted the rear derailer would automatically trim the front. I sold it to buy parts to build up the colnago frame that my brother gave me. Which ironically I later turned into a fixie. Yes I kept all the parts.
I regret getting rid of all my past bikes. Never again.
 

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I still regret getting rid of my old Univega Gran Premio. The frame was of Japanese manufactured Tange steel. It had a beautiful sparkly blue paint job. It had Suntour derailers with these funny down tube shifters that when you shifted the rear derailer would automatically trim the front. I sold it to buy parts to build up the colnago frame that my brother gave me. Which ironically I later turned into a fixie. Yes I kept all the parts.
I regret getting rid of all my past bikes. Never again.
I learned my lesson years ago with cars that I sold that I should have kept, and knew I should have kept! So I won't sell any of the bikes I have; I did sell one about 2 weeks ago, but that one I really didn't like it a whole lot, and that was a Nishiki Olympic I sold to a friend who is having problems running after years of running and he really liked the looks of the bike a lot so I parted with it. Then back in 77 or 78 I sold a 76 Trek TX900 with Campy Record stuff I bought new because I needed a better car! But that was youthful stupidity. Otherwise I normally keep all the bikes I've bought over the years. But bikes do take up less storage space then cars and cost less to maintain!
 
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