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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
One of the most important tips is what to do when you first get a brand new e-bike battery. While you might want to give it a try right away, the first thing you really want to do is plug it in and let it charge for 12 hours.Don’t Overcharge, and don’t Run to Empty Either.

The more cargo you haul, the more people you ride, the heavier your entire e-bike frame is, and the more work your batteries need to drive the electric motors to run your e-bike. Reducing the weight of your eBike will ensure that you can use your eBike battery for many trips.
Do you have any other battery usage considerations to share?
 

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Two skinny J's
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Please post once and stop cross posting as you advertise for free here.
 

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Batteries are like any other part of the ebike. The more care they get, the longer they will last. If you store them fully charged, and keep them on a trickle charger, or other sensible charging method, they will last a long time. They should be stored at a fairly constant temperature, not extreme cold, or extreme heat. ie. Do not store them in front of a heater, or in your car trunk for any length of time. They will last a long time if you do properly care for them.
 

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Deranged Touring Cyclist
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Part of proper care to make the batteries last longer is to PEDAL MORE!!

How about a solar panel helmet that charges it while you ride?
Laugh if you like, but it really can be a thing to tour with an ea-bike, a trailer, and a magnum set of solar panels. I've seen a couple of trike riders do it. I have respect and love the idea, even if I presently choose to ride and tour under my own power. I can also think of a few desert back country rides I'd love to make, but which are simply unreasonable to contemplate without vehicular support in the form of a 4x4.

Canyonlands National Park's White Rim Trail springs immediately to mind: a 100mi loop with zero cell service and literally no access to filterable water despite the presence of 2 rivers. The Park's 'Maze' and 'Needles' sections actually offer even more remote and longer distance opportunities. Ditto a few other parts of Utah, but with the same caveats: whatever you bring with you is all you have in the world. There are no stores and no sources of filterable water. Didn't bring enough or puncture a container? Now we're talking existential risk in the absence of a 4x4. Even if you have a satellite beacon to cry for aid, helicopter rides start at $40k. You can actually buy insurance to cover it, if you have the satellite tracker to summon help in the first place.

The terrain is amazing and the views simply boggle the mind. I love the idea of being able to ride the necessary distances without vehicular support, but even in the winter, it's recommended to drink a gallon per person per day in the back country. 8lbs per gallon x even 5 days gets heavy, and that's solely for drinking. I can see an e-trike or even quad with enough solar panels to reliably recharge it in the field being a way to to ditch the support 4x4.
 
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