HR monitor, do you use one?

Discussion in 'Road Bikes' started by chh55, Nov 23, 2009.

  1. chh55

    chh55 Drink plenty of water!!!

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    I use my heart rate monitor all the time, when biking or spinning. I think it is a great tool for training as well as getting the most speed out of this old bod. Mine's a Polar CS100 with all the bike computer features plus the standard pulse stuff as well. I've had it for 4 years now and wouldn't consider riding without it. How many out there are using a heart rate monitor on their rig? And if so what unit?
     
  2. Xela

    Xela New Member Tavern Member

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    I also use one, and feel naked without it. I find it especially valuable on long group rides where I have a tendency to want to overdo it. It is also a great tool for my indoor-training which, unfortunately, I need to start. Carmichael bases all of his intervals on his trainer DVDs on heart-rate or power. I have seen a few of his that also discuss rate of perceived exertion (RPE), but when I am looking at my target HR, I think I would overestimate my RPE if I was using that.

    I have the Garmin 305. I haven't been able to pull the trigger yet on a power meter, as I always think of something else I would rather have for the bike for the same or less cost.
     

  3. crazyjarhead

    crazyjarhead Guest

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    I use a Garmin 405. Don't spend too much time watching HR during rides on the road - I pay attention to other things. I use the data post ride to see how I've done.

    On stationary bikes I pay close attention to HR -- this allows me to calibrate my perceived exertion.
     
  4. whyeyebike

    whyeyebike New Member

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    I use the Garmin Edge 705, and rely a good deal on the heart rate monitor. I can't remember the last time I road without it. And it is totally necessary if your doing any indoor training. I am in the same boat about a power meter....can't seem to break down and buy one so I need the heart rate to know how well I am training.
     
  5. funetical

    funetical Slowin it up.

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    So you guys use them to gauge your exertion?
     
  6. crazyjarhead

    crazyjarhead Guest

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    i use it to measure exertion on rides and to measure fitness progess
     
  7. cowboycharlie

    cowboycharlie New Member

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    At what heart rate are you overdoing it or does that depend on each person and if so how did you determine your danger level.
     
  8. London

    London Guest

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    When these devices first became available and reliable 25 years ago I used one for a few months. In that time I learned what a certain effort would show on the monitor. In time I could guess my heartrate within 2-3 beats by feel alone. The monitor gave me the feedback to be able to do this. In time I stopped using it because I honesty felt it had "calibrated" me and was of no further use. I still feel this way.

    Two things I did learn from the experience: I ride too hard all the time according to the heart rate charts, even though I do not feel overly ambitious while doing it.

    The other thing is the tendency to stop concentrating on your riding form and technique, along with your natural feelings of fatigue or energy. You start to train according to the machine and not your own feelings at the time. I have never needed a device to make me work hard. I think some hope this gadget will be a magic bullet. It is not. That said, I did learn from the experience and think all serious riders should play with one and see what they think.
     
  9. crazyjarhead

    crazyjarhead Guest

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    lots of stuff out there on how to use heart rate for training -- do a google on it

    there's no simple answer to your question - even the calculation of max heart rate and heart rate zones vary

    simplistic answer is take 220 and subtract your age - that will APPROXIMATE your max -- aerobic training is usually thought to occur at around 60% of your max

    conditioning does very little to max heart rate - that is a function of age and genetics - however, conditioning can reduce resting heart rate
     
  10. whyeyebike

    whyeyebike New Member

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    I found the same thing out when I first started using the heart rate monitor. As a matter of fact, I had to program alerts to notify me when I was pushing to hard. I found that I was sacrificing my endurance because I was in zones to hard for endurance training.

    I agree. One thing you will learn when using a heart rate monitor is you will have days where your heart rate is low, but you feel like your pulling a bus behind you; and other days where you can be at 80% to 90% heart rate max and you feel like you could peddle forever. I still use my heart rate monitor on every ride, but it is a data field I do not follow on my Garmin. The only thing I look at on my computer is the Ride Time, Grade, Miles and Average Speed. When I get home, I can then crunch the numbers to see what my zones are. Keep in mind though I am not training for anything specific, just good health.

    I do however rely on the heart rate monitor during the winter time when I hit the trainer a lot. Getting on the trainer for me is simply a workout and not a recreational ride. Therefore, I want to get the most out of the 60 to 90 minutes I will be riding.
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2009
  11. chh55

    chh55 Drink plenty of water!!!

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    I started with the standard formula.. 220-age= Maxpulse and then bumped it upwards as I hit 102% etc till I arrived at what I kind of think is my Max which is quite a bit higher than the standard method would give. I keep my unit set to read out % of max so at a glance I see my speed and %. I think this is good info to have since the numbers don't always reflect how I feel. I can be stoking up a hill thinking I must be about cooked and see that I have a little extra margin to use, or the opposite, I might be feeling great but see that I'm at 96% so time to ease off a bit. I don't feel at all that I'm a slave to it though. Just another tool and/or toy!
    Powertaps are too expensive for me to think about at this juncture. Next for me would be some kind of GPS like you guys are using. Waiting for them to get cheaper.
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2009
  12. London

    London Guest

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    Years ago some Italian racers did some good research on morning (waking) heart rates as they relate to over-training. Elevated rates in the AM being an indication of too much work in the previous day or days. This kind of thing might be usefull for a serious endurance athlete as it does show when your resting body is working too hard in recovery. But at my age and place in the world, I ride and train naturally. I go slow when I'm feeling beat and go hard when I'm feeling strong. Not how to win the TDF, but it works for me.
     
  13. funetical

    funetical Slowin it up.

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    Do you remember who published the study?