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Well we pulled the trigger on the hybrid bicycle discussion, hope everybody enjoys it :D
 

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essentially a hybrid bicycle is part road bike and part mountain bike they sometimes are also referred to as cyclocross bikes. i have a trek xo-1 and i am able to keep up with the road bikers, and i have the hill climb gear that you would find more typically on a mountain bike, my tires are lugged which allows me to hit dirt roads, fire roads, and some lighter trails where a road bike would just fall apart.
 

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nothing better than being able to ride through a construction zone with out getting off and walking your bike.

That being said I still want a true road bike.
To have a mountain,hybrid,& road bike that would be nice.
 

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I just bought a hybrid bike last month. It's a Diamondback, Edgewood. I love it. Admittedly, I use it for roads 99% of the time, but it fits me just right and I am very happy with it.
 

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My first bike was an MTB (Giant Iguana)...i usually ride on bike paths...paved road, gravel or mud...it was great. Then i decided upgrading to road bike (specialized dolce expert) but i still ride on the same path and so i hardly used my road bike coz i cant use it for rough rides. 3 months ago i got a hybrid...something not too expensive (Giant FCR 3 from last years model so i can get a good deal). This has been my all around bike since. I wish i bought this first.
 

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A hybrid bike has the flat handlebars and upright riding position of a mountain bike anf the 700 tires and thinner frame of a road bike, they are great for riding paved trail, commutig, or just going for short spins around town.
 

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A hybrid bike has the flat handlebars and upright riding position of a mountain bike anf the 700 tires and thinner frame of a road bike, they are great for riding paved trail, commutig, or just going for short spins around town.

That's almost exactly how the salesmen explained a hybrid to my wife and myself the other day. After riding one (Fisher Zambrano) around the shops parking lot we were sold. Picked them up this afternoon, got a little riding in before the rain hit though.
 

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I have a Jamis Explorer 2, thay say it is a comford bike but it is sort of a hybrid too.That is what I think
 

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I have a Jamis Explorer 2, thay say it is a comford bike but it is sort of a hybrid too.That is what I think
I think that having the 26" tires puts that in the comfort mountain bike category, but apart from the tires and wheels that is pretty much a hybrid.
 

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I have a cyclocross racing bike.
It is sort of half way between a mountain bike and a pure road bike.
It has road bike geometry and componentry(Shimano Ultegra 2x10=20 speed)with road bike rims.
But has mountain bike center pull brakes, along with an extra set of brake levers on the top part of the handlebars.
And tread on its tires.
 

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Hybrid Bike

I own a Specialized Neon hybrid, it is exactly what I needed, my local bike shoe owner decided on it when I talked to him about where I ride. Mostly I ride on paved roads, but go on some pretty nasty dirt trails and it does pretty well, road bikes have nothing on this bike, except the bars and brake console. I road a Spec/Roubaix at Solvang during Tour of Ca, only thing I liked more than my bike was, you guessed it, the bars and brake/shifter complex. I'm considering going to this type of bars/brakes, but haven't got the money together to convert yet, my hands don't seem to get a numb with the drop bars, and the winds get pretty strong in the mountains where I ride and it is nice to be able to get down out of it a little.

DrB
 

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I'm sort of creating my own "hybrid". I've ordered 1.5" x 26" tires & tubes for my Diamondback Mtn. bike.
I'm wanting a bike for sidewalks. Something that can take uneven driveway approaches and maybe hop a curb onc in a while. Yet have small enough tires to do some distance.
 

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There are so many different types of hybrids. You can lean toward more road or trail depending what YOU like and some allow you both by simply changing out tire size and type to suit specific ride conditions. I've had a both full out road bike and a hardtail mtb, without any reservations I like my '11 Cannondale Quick Carbon 2 the best. Go to your LBS and ride as many different types till you find the one.
 

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I have a 7 month old Schwinn. With the tires that are on it, I think it is more a road bike then anything else. Least that's what I bought it for. The only time I've ever ridden it off pavement was on stable crushed stone shoulders. It handled that well.

Must ask, my bike is a 21 speed. Is the gearing on that, especially the high gears, less then what would be on a road bike? Do they use a higher gear count on the crank?
 

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I have a 7 month old Schwinn. With the tires that are on it, I think it is more a road bike then anything else. Least that's what I bought it for. The only time I've ever ridden it off pavement was on stable crushed stone shoulders. It handled that well.

Must ask, my bike is a 21 speed. Is the gearing on that, especially the high gears, less then what would be on a road bike? Do they use a higher gear count on the crank?

It all depends. Like it was stated above the Hybrid class is very wide in usage purposes.
Some of the hybrids are road oriented, some of them has more off-road orientation. (Trek FX and DS families).

Usually the hybrids have 48 tooth count on the front cog. And may have 11-32 in the rear. Some of the hybrids are 12-27 or 12-25 and 50 in the front. It will be the same as on road bikes with compact (50) crankset.

I installed 11-25 9 speed cassette (having 48 on the cranks) on my hybrid and it very close setup to what regular compact road bike has.

The most difference between the road bike and road oriented hybrid will be most upright position on the second one. Although you can change this' like I did on my hybrid -I simply coordinated the main points of contact on my road bike with on my hybrid. A now I have the same road feel ...
 

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Realize that with the upright sitting position, I'm causing more wind drag then I need to. However, I have extensive arthritis in my spine and neck and bending over and tilting my head back more would end up being very painful. Therefore, I'm going to stay with the straight handle bars.

Found that while ridding downhill, I can barely peddle fast enough in high gear to keep up with the bike. Thought that a higher gear tooth count might help. Might also cause me to go faster.
 

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Hybrids are certainly characterized by flat or raised bars, but as justEd points out, this doesn't necessarily mean an upright riding position. On my sporty hybrid the handlebars are three inches below saddle height.

Years ago, I rode a MTB with drop bars. I would call that a hybrid too, but I use the term hybrid as defined in common English language usage rather than as defined by bicycle marketers.
 

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A hybrid bike has the flat handlebars and upright riding position of a mountain bike anf the 700 tires and thinner frame of a road bike, they are great for riding paved trail, commutig, or just going for short spins around town.
it's good for midrange rides as well, I own a hybrid and it's no problem to rack up 15 or 20 miles on a ride, I know this isn't super long but I wouldn't consider it a short spin either. although if you want to go greater distances the road bike is the answer.
 

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Most of them are not really "performance" oriented. I'd say most of them are marketed as exercise bikes or entry level bikes for older people. I like them though. If you ditch the giant couch of a seat, and upgrade the stem to something solid, most of them can take a pretty good beating on trails and gravel roads. Cheap bikes are good when you want to ride something that is probably going to tear it up, or out in the boonies where you might even have to ditch the bike if it gets busted up.

http://best-hybridbikes.co.cc/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/Best-Hybrid-Bikes.jpg

http://best-hybridbikes.co.cc/2012/05/05 article

I scoffed at hybrid bikes years ago, but then I remembered how much fun I had as a teenager, riding on an old Schwinn with mustache bars and 10 speed gears. I would have loved to have something like this, but with a more "sport" seat. The big comfort seats are heavy and suck a lot of your power away. So do shocks.
http://s4.hubimg.com/u/4158431_f520.jpg
 
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