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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Went to ride my bike Friday and rear tire was flat. Turned compressor on but tire won't stay inflated. Figured the tube popped for some reason. Went out and bought a new one. Had to get it at a bike shop, our wally world doesn't carry 28" tubes or tires.

It's been over 50 years since I last fixed a flat on bike. Had to ask the bike shop if there was anything special you have to do with the gear changer. Pulled the old tube out (bike is 7 months old) and found that the inner liner had shifted and the tube blistered and popped at one of the spoke holes. There was another unpopped blister right next to the one that let go.

Went to put the new tube in and immediately saw that the air valve was different then the Schroeder valves I'm use to. Couldn't figure out how to get air into this style valve so I took it back. Good thing in that they told me about the liner shifting and sold me a new self stick liner. Got everything back together, took time to adjust the brakes, clean and re-oil the chain and went for a enjoyable 10 mile ride.
 

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Funny story.

Buy a couple more tubes, a frame pump and a patch kit. You were incredibly lucky. The odds have turned, you will have a couple more flats in the coming weeks. They come in batches and you are long overdue!

What tires do you use? 28" rims? I'd love to see some photos of your trusty steed. (perhaps Daguerreotype images? :D)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
50 years?
I last fixed a flat bike tire when I was 16 years old. Shortly thereafter got my drivers license. Goodbye bikes for 30 years or so. Some time in my mid forties, I bought a bike. I had that for 20 years and never had a flat other then air escaping during winter storage and needing to be pumped back up.

Was surprise to see the flat and nothing be wrong with the tire itself.
 

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I've fixed about 1 billion in the last 20+ years. Either for my friends, random riders (mostly girls) out on the trail, while working at a bike shop, and for my neighbors.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Funny story.

Buy a couple more tubes, a frame pump and a patch kit. You were incredibly lucky. The odds have turned, you will have a couple more flats in the coming weeks. They come in batches and you are long overdue!

What tires do you use? 28" rims? I'd love to see some photos of your trusty steed. (perhaps Daguerreotype images? :D)
Can see the value in having a couple extra tubes along. Already have the frame pump. Bought a couple of plastic levers for prying the tire open. Have a small tool kit on the bike.

Sorry about the picture. My wife's digital camera stopped working about 4 months ago and she won't let me buy her another one until she gets a good deal. No skin off my nose.

I'm riding a 7 month old Schwinn that I bought at Target. For a Schwinn it had good recommendations on the net. It is a hybid with 28" rims. I'm 6'-2" so it's a good fit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I've fixed about 1 billion in the last 20+ years. Either for my friends, random riders (mostly girls) out on the trail, while working at a bike shop, and for my neighbors.
Since most of my riding is on paved surfaces, my chances of having a flat are somewhat less. The area I've been using for the past 20+ years is a combination of residential and industrial. The road to the industrial area goes through the subdivision I live in. You do have to be careful of the heavy truck traffic and start and quitting times at the power plant.

I'm left with the impression that you ride much more often then I do. Due to problems with cold weather I don't go out it's <40 degrees. I don't do trail ridding.:eek: I've got enough problems with arthritis without pushing it.
 

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Always carry the means to repair a tire. I ride nothing but roads, and once I took a piece of pool-screen wire, a single strand, that hit dead onto the tire and nailed itself perfectly perpendicular right through my Kevlar insert. I couldn't believe it when I saw it, and it took a lot of tugging to get it out - must have been a perfect alignment of molecules to get that to happen.

Further, I was never very keen about changing out that rear tire (the chain and all). Changed out the front once or twice - not too hard if you have a nice place to work and some time to consider what you are doing. Then one Friday night in the slummy part of my commute home, I blew the back tire right out. That was great. Just pulled over and put my back to the wall of a gym. Put out my tools (and my mace amongst them) and got that back tire off, tubed out, and on in record time.

Cycling is like flying - plan ahead.
 

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For rear tire repair, before loosening quick release, shift to small chainring/small cog first, to maximize chain slack.

The reason to carry spare tubes is in case a damaged tube cannot be repaired. An example is a rim strip that has shifted, like yours did. I have done hundreds, perhaps a thousand, flat repairs, and I prefer patching to replacing tubes to save a little money and reduce consumption. I have never successfully gotten a patch to function properly (for more than a short period of time) when placed on the inside half of the inner tube, and I have quit trying. I have close to 100% success with patches on the side of the tube that usually gets punctured. Except for glueless patches. They will fail everytime I use one, most recent attempt lasted months. Glue on patched last forever (if positioned on the tube as mentioned above).
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I wish I had quick release on the rear but they are bolted. I've now added a small tool case to the bike and will add a 13mm box end wrench to the other tools. The bike store gave me the advice to shift to the smallest outside gear before removing the wheel. That helped.

I'm going to get another tube or two plus another roll of self stick velox if the front tire gives me trouble. At least the front has quick release.
 

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I recommend removing the front wheel and inspecting the rim tape before you have a problem. Keep in mind that the front and rear wheels on your bike are the same and you could have the same problem develope down the road while riding. Front tire flats are much more dangerous that rear tire flats.
 
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