Just told to get bent

Discussion in 'General Bike Discussion' started by photosbymark, Sep 7, 2010.

  1. photosbymark

    photosbymark New Member

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    Well actually its not the first time the wife has said this to me in nearly 20 years, but its the first time I think I was actually glad to hear it.

    Just got the ok to buy a recumbent to help with the problem I've been having with my knees. Looking forward to testing it out.
     
  2. Gandalfe

    Gandalfe '57 Schwinn Wasp

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    From the title I thought you were going this way:

    My wife sat down next to me as I was flipping channels.
    She asked, "What's on TV?"
    I said, "Dust."
    And then the fight started...
     

  3. BlazingPedals

    BlazingPedals Member

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    Don't expect a recumbent to help with knee issues. They have all the same issues with knees that upright bikes have, except the added issue that newbies tend to not spin enough.
     
  4. photosbymark

    photosbymark New Member

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    This time it will. The upright bike just didn't fit. My knee was too far forward even with the seat all the way back. The bike came with a seat post with a 20mm set back, so the most I could move back with a different post would have been about an inch. That might have been enough, but the cost was crazy for a Fuji Newest 3.0.

    LBS just gave me the same lecture about spinning. It made sense that it would be hard on the drive line as well. The gearing is different so spinning should be almost a must, but that isn't bad. The faster I turn with less effort, the easier it will be on the knee.

    The LBS put it this way. IF you are feeling like you are working your legs, you probably need a lower gear. This isn't weight training. Made perfect sense to me.

    Got a couple of miles on it and the comfort level is amazing.
     
  5. BlazingPedals

    BlazingPedals Member

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    So, what did you get?
     
  6. Gandalfe

    Gandalfe '57 Schwinn Wasp

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    And I'd luv to know what your first impressions of the experience is. It looks to me to be harder to ride. I've also harbored the feeling that your vision is somewhat limited by the lower, reclined position.
     
  7. Engyo

    Engyo Bent Newbie - old rider

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    Depends on the bike, of course, but my vision is significantly increased in my position on my V3 (recumbent) as opposed to my Trek (diamond frame). With the V3 I don't get a sore neck, and from straight ahead to about 100 degrees on either side vision is much better. I can also easily look up, which is nearly impossible on the DF without removing at least one hand from the bars. Ironically, it is easier to see directly behind you on the DF (by tipping the head down and turning); I find mirrors are a must on the recumbent.
     
  8. photosbymark

    photosbymark New Member

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    I got a Sunray Sx. Very basic and low cost starter, but it looks like it will serve my needs quite well. Much like the E racer I think or maybe its a model of the E racer.

    First is the plus factors. I am not nearly as reclined as many recumbent bikes, but the upright position isn't as much of a negative as one might think. Not being so low to the ground helps me be seen. Because the backside is so much lower to the ground to start with, I am not sure I actually have that much of a higher profile from an aero standpoint. It's a 26/20 and I think I like that with the downside of having to carry an extra sized tire and tube.

    Visibility for me is far better. When you neck is bent, its not as easy or a comfortable as when your neck is straight. Scanning the road is much easier. However this is one bike I would consider a mirror a must. You might disagree and that's ok. Yet with this position they actually are functional. In fact I just might add one on both bar ends.

    Some have made the starting and stopping seem like it took an act of Congress to learn. Actually for me it felt quite natural. Going to move some pedals off a mountain bike so I can use the spd cleats, but don't expect a problem with that either.

    Mine has the over seat steering, much like the butterfly handlebars I had as a kid. It was a very relaxed way to ride. Without having to take some of the body weight, no need to shift positions because your hands are going numb.

    A couple of downs. First is no quick release wheels. Have a flat, and you better have a wrench to take the wheel off. That I might deal with later. Biggest thing they should have put on and didn't was a cage for a water bottle. Think I can find a way to tie wrap one on, but I also have a hydration pack that will be much easier to wear when you aren't bent over, but just bent.

    Brakes are good and natural. Not a fan of the twist shift, but it works. Think Id prefer a trigger shift and may change it later, but ok for now. Seat is ok, and I might like even more after I ride it a while. This bike doesn't have a full back, but just a small back support. Might be better in the summer time here, but doesn't have nearly the support of a sling seat. The adjustment mechanism could be better, but its ok. The bike came with tires that can take pressure up to 60psi. I already have a few 26 inch tires and tubes that can take 100 and the first time the wheel needs to come off they are going on. This bike isn't a speed demon by any means. The Fuji was faster, but I think I can ride this one as long as my fitness can take it and enjoy it. It has more of a mountain bike gearing. This type of bike needs a unique type of ratios. I think its going to need the granny gears for the hills, but I think there could be some improvement to allow for a higher cruise speed. Still all in all, it's not bad. Might try to upgrade later, but if you want outright speed this bike is not for you.

    But this may have been the most comfortable ride I have ever had on any bike. This would be good for the weekend rider, a commuter, or even some touring, but don't race it unless you want finish last. Yet I suspect you would have just as much fun as the winner.

    Hack how is that for a review???
     
  9. retromike3

    retromike3 retromike3

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    recumbent goods and bad's

    The good thing about recumbents is they are very fast and easy on your back(as long as you are very careful about potholes) the bad thing about them is the fact they don't climb worth a darn.

    I had a Infinity long wheelbase type and it was grate on the flats and going down hills. Going up hills was a different story all together. I had to get a super low gear to go up the last hill on the way home. I needed a 24-34 to get where I needed to be.

    It was grate fun to ride and I really liked the positive reaction I got from everybody who I passed along the way.

    Mike
     
  10. BlazingPedals

    BlazingPedals Member

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    The EZ-Sunray SX is a semi-recumbent. Not that I'm against swelling the ranks of recumbenteurs out there, but I'm scratching my head over your switch. You couldn't afford a new mid-level road bike that would fit you, so you bought a new low-end semi-recumbent that cost nearly as much. (About $200 difference.) At least you're getting some recumbent-like benefits from it and you'll have a better idea in a year or two if you want to go the Full Monty and get a real 'bent.

    Oh, and congrats on the new bike! (Congrats are always in order when you get a new bike!)
     
  11. photosbymark

    photosbymark New Member

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    The road bike I have always seemed to hurt. Trouble is that I was close. I test rode the DF bike and everything felt fine. I'm not against DF either. If I can find the solution later, I'll ride them both. My weight made the bent over position less comfortable than it was in my youth. I could deal with that, but the up and down adjustments just didn't seem to stop the knee pain no matter what. That also in my youth I might have tolerated to an extent, but when you are old you know you don't heal very fast.

    I did some checking and the Fuji Newest 3.0 according to Fuji already has 20mm set back in the seat post, and I was already all the way back. A new seat post I priced would have been in the $100 range and maybe + to get to maybe 50 mm of set back. That would give me a little over another inch in adjustment, and that may or may not have been enough. Just standing over the bike, it felt right. Maybe the next size up would have given me better geometry, but it would have made standing over the bike far far closer. I just didn't know enough at the time. I also just may have one of those odd bodies that has an extra long length between my hip and my knee.

    I got the EZ Sunray SX for $325 and would have had to spend at least half that to maybe get me to fix the fuji. A crank forward design also might be in the works, but the SX like you said was also thought to be a test to see if I want to get more bent.

    The two most important things to me are. 1. Am I hurting to ride and 2. Am I having fun.

    So far I am getting the right answers to both.
     
  12. shoalster

    shoalster New Member

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    I have a Sunray SX semi recumbent and it is the most comfortable bicycle I have ever owned and I have owned a full recumbent bicycle.
    why is it necessary to have a full recumbent? they are harder on the knees than an upright bike and also gravity works against your knee joints because they're parallel to the ground , IMHO a semi recumbent is in overall better bike. Also the minimalist seat of the sunray SX is a lot cooler than a fullback recumbent seat , especially here in the Florida Keys .