Knee and Elbow Pads

Discussion in 'Activism / Safety' started by bikerepublic, May 28, 2009.

  1. bikerepublic

    bikerepublic Guest

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    How many of your actually wear knee and elbow pads and think that they are necessary for road cycling? I fully understand the need for them in BMX and mountain biking.
     
  2. riderman14

    riderman14 Guest

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    anytime chicks wear knee pads is cool by me!!ride on
     

  3. camilo

    camilo New Member

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    I think I'd shake my head if I saw a road biker wearing that stuff. But I'm a guy who doesn't actually think helmets are important.
     
  4. TxCyclist

    TxCyclist Administrator Staff Member Admin Staff

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    I think it's a little extreme but I would not look down on someone for doing so.
     
  5. Tarukai

    Tarukai SMILEY CAR

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    I think for road cycling it's not as necessary, as it seems like it'd be a bit bulky and in the way.

    MTB and BMX have more of a reason for it I think.
     
  6. mefistofeles

    mefistofeles New Member

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    I wear knee, elbow and wrist pads for mountain and road riding. Plus a fox chest protector and kidney belt.

    Some people may think this is extreme but I just got back from a road ride with a group of fixies and lost traction when the surface transitioned from concrete to asphalt I landed on my elbow. Fortunately I had elbow pads so when I landed aside from a few minor abrasions I was fine.

    Approximately one month ago I was road riding with a friend when he clipped my rear tire. I went down again. However my elbow pads worked at 100% and I didn't even suffer any abrasions. I later looked at my left wrist pad and it look like it had been partially melted. If I had gone down without my wrist pads I probably would have sprained my wrist for sure.

    I haven't used the chest protector yet, and the helmet did save my life once when I hit a car.

    Of course then there was the time I hit a car, rolled over it and emerged with no more than a series of abrasions. Incidently the car looked like it had suffered a few thousand dollars worth of damage after I collided with it on my bike.

    However the helmet saved my head from going through the windshield and from having brains scrapped all over the asphalt. The knee and elbow pads saved me from any secondary injuries that occured after the collision.

    I started wearing wrist pads after spraining my wrist mountain biking. Speaking from personal experience, yes the gear can constrain your mobility but having even a minor accident can constrain your mobility for a few weeks or even a few months.

    Sure you can be careful but no one can be assure me that their riding is 100% safe and perfect. Although I agree the chest protector can be a bit much, and make you sweat profusely, I think the other gear ( helmet, knee, elbow and wrist pads) is something that you'll use pretty often and is probably well worth any mobility tradeoff. I can ride with the fixies and manuver faster than any of peers at high speeds or through tight spaces so I think any perception that protective gear will slow you down significantly is an inaccurate one.
     
  7. rojoyinc

    rojoyinc Banned

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    i think it would be wise, but I won't because cyclists look ridiculous enough already. I always pass people on the roads and trails (road trails) and they always smile. I THINK cuz I look so silly. I wear my wrap around sports glasses (prescription) my bike pant/jersey, helmet (mine looks silly, but came with my bike) and camelbak. And fingerless gloves. I always smile and wave because when you see hardcore bikers pass they never do. (I'm trying to change that) It's like they think they're to cool to say hi. ? I don't care what people think over all, but I think pads would put me over the top. (nerd).

    Though I've wiped out twice and such pads would have helped in both cases. The worst of the two really ripped a chunk out of my elbow as I lost it and creamed, slid along a wire fence (the one that seperate the wildlife from the freeway). The worst part was my handlebar jabbed me in the lower abdomin. (hurt for a week, brused) and no pads would have helped that.

    Someone said above about not wearing helmet. I'd say the same, except we know of SEVERAL people who were biking without one that took the simplist of slips n gravel, hit their heads on the road and died. If you get hit or ticked by a car - kiss your rear goodbye if you don't have a helmet. I do feel they are needed and wear one 95% of the time. Though dork factor is strong in a hemlet... It's at least the norm when seeing a biker. I think the pads would be over the top nerdy. Maybe some neoprene pads (low profile) under a long sleeved jersey?) Id' be more concerned with elbows more than knees. Think is I'm 55 and at 50+ we break things easier than younger people. Still not ready to nerd-out in full padded body yet. = )
     
  8. rojoyinc

    rojoyinc Banned

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    If you must- do check out the neoprene pads. I use them when sailing my hobie catamarans. They're fairly THIN about 5/16ths thick. Just like (wrist sweat bands) but made of neoprene. That would absorb some shock and would stop any abrasions from falls on blacktop. They're black, don'e really restrict mobility much, and wouldn't look the least obtrusive when road biking. They actually may even look kinda cool... lowest on the nerd factor. I'd wear em, if I crashed more often.
    I think adding mini break levers to my aerobars would do more in helping me stay safe than more pads. My son has a 2nd mini set of levers on his bike. My worst crash into the fence was due to excessive speed in a turn and not being able to get to my brakes fast enough.
     
  9. newleaf150

    newleaf150 Deranged Touring Cyclist Tavern Member

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    To h3ll with the dork factor! I'd never considered using pads for road cycling, but must say I like the idea, especially with winter coming. I want to cycle through the cold and snow, but have concerns about learning to ride on/deal with ice without breaking bones in the process. I see pads helping a lot there.

    As for helmet use, I've been up close and personal with a couple of traumatic brain injury cases in ppl I knew. Though the injuries had nothing to do with cycling, the aftermath was enough to convince me to always wear a helmet, period. It's just not worth the risk to me.

    That said, to each his or her own. The one that really gets me is seeing people on the road and local MUPs cycling bare-headed, with their helmets securely attached to the headset of their bikes. Either wear it or don't. If you're not going to, why carry it?

    Seems easier to just admit to your SO that you won't wear a helmet and be done with it! I see a lot of these, and can promise the helmet looks even dumber attached to your headset than it would in the location where it might do some good.
     
  10. omnivox42

    omnivox42 New Member Tavern Member

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  11. davereo

    davereo Well-Known Member Tavern Member

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    I ride year round in New England.
    I Avoid Ice. If you are riding on ice cars will be driving on ice. I have two serious crashes behind me and my knees and elbows survied with the least injuries. BMX and mountain bike crashes are different than what happens out on the road.
     
  12. newleaf150

    newleaf150 Deranged Touring Cyclist Tavern Member

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    My concern isn't so much with trying to ride on a ribbon of ice - for SURE not with cars. I'm more concerned with unexpectedly hitting the patch of shaded wet that recently became ice. I've got access to some great MUPs, so cycling with cars in icy conditions is totally NOT what I'm planning :eek:

    I haven't eaten it on the road badly enough to bang myself up in a long time <knocking on wood>, but I had a couple of pavement-cycling crashes on my MTB back in the day that would have been much less damaging had I been wearing knee and elbow pads. Would they help now? Not sure, but I like the idea.

    I'm not saying you're wrong, btw. Everyone's experience is different. How often do you cycle in winter? I did a very little bit last season and really want to keep it up this season. :thumbsup:
     
  13. bikertank

    bikertank Senior Member

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    I think it all depends on the level of risk you want to accept when doing any activity - I know many riders that do curves much faster than I do - because I simply am not needing to get there that fast - in all out straights the risk is much less - the same for protective gear - one poster wears alot and he has had the accidents to prove to him the risk is great where he rides - the only time you think you need protective gear is usually after the accident - I need a mostly intact body to do my job so I take less risk - and I am only competitive with myself and the computer on my bike - I say wear what you want - it is your body and I say pad up if you want too!
     
  14. davereo

    davereo Well-Known Member Tavern Member

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    From 11/1/11 through 4/1/12 I road close to 2000 miles. January and February tend to be the most difficult months. I get out 4 or 5 times a week if road conditions co-operate. During times that we have snow packed on the sides of the roads I go out for a ride in my truck and observe the melt and freezing. If the roads are a mess I will stay home. Last winter we had very little snow so I only had to battle the cold.

    I also work the second shift so that helps me with the shorten daylight hours. That is another challenge that the winter presents.

    I believe that once you get out there riding during the winter you will begin to feel comfortable using the same safety precautions you use during the warmer weather. Although we all are different as you have noted so if you feel more comfortable with the extra padding you should use it.
     
  15. rojoyinc

    rojoyinc Banned

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    I carried mine once for a short bit. Wore it all the time, then took it off for a break, was HOT and sweaty - so I rode home with it on my aerobars. Could these folks be doing that? Also - might be more useful on the road. We then go to the park and there are miles of blacktop trails and well the helmet isn't as necessary you could assume (no cars or traffic) though lots of near path tree's. We tend to keep ours on, but I can see how some might take it off if it's really hot out. One would seem REALLY STUPID to get in a crash and have it on their headset. ;-)
     
  16. rojoyinc

    rojoyinc Banned

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    Utimately - we an look dorky... but who's the dork that can walk away from a crash with no scrapes or bruses. (due to mega padding) = )
    Someday it will be worth the hassle to wear the pads.
    I've only been cycling for like 3 months and already two crashes.
    ONE bad one stupid gravel road SLOW tight turn, slip - landed on my hands. (now I wear gloves)
     
  17. qmsdc15

    qmsdc15 Well-Known Member

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    Once I made adjustment to my bike then test rode around the block to discover freshly milled road as I came around the corner. Crashes happen, I had to dig many pieces of road out of my hands that evening. Ouch. I wear gloves usually.

    I had some nice knee/shin pads when I rode MTB.
     
  18. davereo

    davereo Well-Known Member Tavern Member

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    I still have one digit bandaged from mishap 16 days ago. Gloves are good. I never ride without them.

    During the fall and early spring I find that mechanics full finger gloves work good. I just picked up a three pack of Firm Grip work gloves at Home Depot for under 10 bucks.