Leomo Type-S

Discussion in 'General Bike Discussion' started by StormStrikes, Jun 27, 2020.

  1. StormStrikes

    StormStrikes Member

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    https://www.leomo.io/pages/introducing-type-s

    The geek and nerd part of me really loves this, though I don't know that it is ready for broader acceptance, but it is certainly cool and working in networking and seeing the trend of software automation/configuration, white label gear, etc., and the trend to more wide capability yet flexible through customization devices, I can see this sort of thing becoming more of the norm over time.

    I certainly like the idea of it, but I don't see it as something, yet, that would persuade me to ditch my phone and Garmin Forerunner.
     
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  2. John_V

    John_V Moderator Staff Member Mod Team Tavern Member

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    Too expensive and too many gadgets/features that most likely would never be utilized to justify the cost. I set up two custom pages on my Bolt that seldom get looked at. There was three but with this heat, I’m starting to look at my temperature page a lot more. Sometimes the KISS principle is the best way to go.
     
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  3. StormStrikes

    StormStrikes Member

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    From a rider perspective, yes, but from an analytics perspective the more data the better. But I think we are going to see more things trend this way. Think of how this could be used in bike fit, for example.

    Another example, my Garmin Forerunner. I haven't used my Garmin Edge 810 in quite some time, probably since the beginning of this year in fact. Why? Because it does almost all that my Edge does (well, all that I used it for anyway) but so much more like when I go running, swimming, and rowing. So I have most of the functionality of my Edge on my wrist now with added capability and functions.

    In fact, I am probably going to upgrade before long to the Garmin Fenix to add a few other features, and the Fenix does include pretty much everything my Edge can do.
     
  4. Merlincustom

    Merlincustom Senior Member

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    Data is a double edged sword. Trying to track too much info during a ride leads to cognitive overload and is distracting. It can also negatively effect performance. I was getting dropped by a fast group when I was watching my heart rate climb. I would worry as it approached max or close to it. I hung on better when I got off that screen. Yet looking at that same data after a ride is interesting. Now that I train with power I don’t even think about heart rate anymore. I check my intensity factor screen periodically on a century ride for example to make sure I’m not going to cook myself. I also keep an eye on normalized power. I’ve had to memorize my 1, 5, 10, and 20 minute power numbers because there’s no Garmin screen for that. Those numbers are useful when you attack, respond to an attack, try to bridge to someone up the road, etc. That said, being in tune with your body and knowing your perceived exertion is also key.
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2020 at 8:24 AM
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  5. John_V

    John_V Moderator Staff Member Mod Team Tavern Member

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    Reading the description of this device, it’s basically a cell phone that incorporates individual sensors. I’m sure that at some point, if sensors become the new training craze, you’ll start seeing apps that will do the same thing. While it’s true that the more data you have the more in tune you are with what you’re trying to do, but how many people need that kind of data just to go for a bike ride?

    I’ve been riding at Flatwoods for nine years. It’s where the USF cycling team trains as well as most triathletes. Two distance world records were broken there so there are quite a few riders that train there that could use that data. On the other side are the majority of cyclist (most of whom I know) who come down there and do their group or solo rides on their road bikes with the mindset that every pedal stroke has to produce maximum wattage. None of these guys compete in anything, so in the end, all they’re doing is going for a bike ride. I can’t see how that data, and added cost, will benefit them, or most cyclists for that matter, on their 21-28 mile rides, two or three days a week.
     
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  6. lectrichead

    lectrichead Well-Known Member

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    Yea, I think it depends on the person, I have a couple extra data screens on my Edge and there's days when I barely look at the Edge at all, in general. Then there are days when I am doing an intense climb and go to my 'climb' screen or doing intervals and want to watch my stats closely.

    Merlincustom - you can use one of the note fields for your power numbers and such. Like "Race Notes" - https://apps.garmin.com/en-US/apps/807dbfcf-ff13-4b45-ac3b-f801186dfa68#0
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2020 at 2:43 PM
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  7. StormStrikes

    StormStrikes Member

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    I completely agree with what you are saying. There is a point, where for the average weekend cyclist or even most everyday type cyclist, there can be a lot of data overload, particularly if you do not know WHAT to do with that data or HOW to use it properly.

    I know for me personally, when I used my Edge, I pushed harder having those numbers in my face. The upside is I was getting better and faster. The downside, I had my face in those numbers instead of enjoying the ride as it were. However, I didn't mind either, that's just who I am. I like to have something to push against and seeing those numbers gave me a challenge. Not everyone is like that, I am, however. I like the challenge and often find it as much fun for me as the ride itself. It's not for everyone.

    With my Garmin Forerunner, I dont have those numbers in front of me, so that introduces a whole new challenge. As you mentioned, I find myself pushing against my perceived exertion now and comparing that with the data after the ride. I have found it to be a better balance between all data (the Edge) and seeing where I am riding and enjoying the ride too.

    I especially like looking at the data after the ride. Without the L/R balance (though on my power meter its not true L/R) that my power meter provides I would have never known how out of kilter I was and been able to start addressing that. My rides are much more balanced now, though I keep in mind, it's not true L/R balance and don't let it bother me if its not perfect and I take into account the ride I was on too. There are certain rides that throw it off I have learned.
     
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  8. StormStrikes

    StormStrikes Member

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    I think we are kind of saying the same thing. I agree that not everyone needs that data. Whether or not, however, the current trend is to these kinds of devices. That is, packing as much capability into a device possible, then leaving it for anyone who so chooses, to use it as needed rather than being tied to a specific device with more limited capability.

    Your right in that it's probably not going to benefit the riders you mentioned, but I also stated that it's probably not ready for wider adoption, and even stated even I, someone who LOVES data, would probably not buy one.

    The cost is not that horrific, actually, when you consider the cost of something like a higher end Garmin Edge. I think, however, it's biggest issue is that it really doesn't know if its a phone or a bike computer. On the same hand, however, I would never presume what each individual cyclist would need or benefit from. You're right in you probably don't 'need' that much data, but if you know or learn how to use it, it could be very helpful. I also stated that while it may not be all that useful to less than elite riders, what about bike fitters? Maybe the everyday rider doesn't need it, but how many new cyclist have come around and left the sport because of a bad bike fit. I don't know about Florida, but around here, bike fits are pretty costly and new cyclists coming in buying sub $1000 bikes (or entry level type bikes) aren't too keen on spending upwards a third that much on a professional bike fit.

    Imagine, then, using this device and being able to do that same bike fit, at the same quality, for a third of the price.

    Someone has to be the innovator and push things to new levels in order to see what more is possible and while this device may not be for everyone, I think it is doing just that.
     
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  9. Merlincustom

    Merlincustom Senior Member

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    Thanks. Just downloaded the app.
     
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