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Discussion Starter #1
We were all new cyclists at some point and along the journey in cycling there have been lessons learned either from mistakes of your own or just trial and error.

It is my belief that many people do not stick with cycling due to errors or lack of knowledge pertaining to the cycling experience.

Let's say a new cyclist was lost on how to become a "cyclist" and approached you for some pearls of wisdom.

What would you tell them?

For me I would tell them to always hydrate and eat before a ride. Get a good bike fitting. I'd also suggest they ALWAYS check their tire pressures before a ride. When in traffic, always perform an over-the-shoulder look before making turns. Finally, make sure your orient the tumbler on your lock to make theft difficult but also so you can reach it to unlock the bike!

Regardless of style of bike or type of riding, what would you suggest?
 

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Do not ride with headphones in. It limits your awareness of what is around you (cars, biting dogs, gnomes, etc) and will keep you from listening to your breathing.

Dont breathe from your chest. Breath steadily from your gut. You do not want short chaotic breaths.
 

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Learn how to repair flats at home before venturing out on rides longer than you are willing to walk. Always carry the tools and supplys needed to so when riding.
Flat repair is simple but it is best to know how to do it before hitting the road.
 

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Always carry the following items on every ride:
1) Cell phone (fully charged)
2) Patch Kit
3) Spare Tube
4) A way to inflate your tube (i.e. pump, CO2)
5) Some cash
6) Emergency info. (if you are cheap like me - a typed & laminated small paper), easily found by EMS with blood type, medical conditions and family contact information. {I hope this is never, ever used - but just in case}
7) ALWAYS wear your helmet.
8) Use gloves
9) ....and glasses.

Now - get out there and have some fun.
If you are new, don't be afraid to make suggestions to those that have some miles behind us. Speaking for myself, I may be an old dog, but I CAN learn new tricks. ;)
 

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Two skinny J's
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Do not ride with headphones in. It limits your awareness of what is around you (cars, biting dogs, gnomes, etc) and will keep you from listening to your breathing.
Not to be argumentative or disrespecting your views but this is one I have seen studies that say other wise, and not specifically to cycling but workouts and endurance in generall.

I don't necessarily subscribe ( to not wearing ) to that as I do wear ear buds while I ride and music while I workout.

I have never felt that my awareness was anymore or less with or without ear buds. I do keep it at a reasonable level and can hear traffic and talk to those I ride with.
Poor grammar as always but in a hurry to get out the door :D

Just a couple of quick examples of which I am sure we could finad as many that say not to.

Workout Music


The Effects Of Music On Exercise
 

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Rola, you are correct. Headphones on a ride is a matter of opinion. I used to wear them and found them diatracting. I felt disconnected and had issues hearing cars around me even on low volumes. With that being said my opinion is that they are not a good idea at least when sharing roads with cars.
 

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Yesterday tired old man, Today retired old man
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Hearing is a sence that cyclest nead to be sharp I would not use anything in or near my ears, it might be ok on the trainer but not on the road.
My ¢¢
 

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I agree with Wild. besides i like to listen to whats around me and just to think
(work all day,wife,kids)cycling is my me time to rest and just think.
 

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Premium Member
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Discussion Starter #10
Another one. If you have Presta valves, a Shrader adapter is a good thing ot carry in your saddle bag. It allows you to fill up with air from commerical air sources such as gas stations and car washes.

If you start using clipless pedals, practice on a trainer first! If you do not have a trainer, a grass field is preferable to the road.

Wear a jersey! Once you start wearing a jersey that wicks moisture as opposed to a cotton t-shirt, you'll be much, much more comfortable.
 

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Carry some type of ID. Road ID is a popular form that allows you to put contact numbers and such.

I also keep an old drivers license in my saddle bag. I have wound a couple of wraps around the license with electrical tape to use in an emergency repair. Doesnt take much room and serves multiple uses.
 

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Wear a helmet.
Bring a small saddle bag with ID and a patch kit.
Get a good pair of padded shorts if you plan on riding a lot.
Remember to unclick before you stop!
 

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Deranged Touring Cyclist
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<great advice snipped>
Wear a jersey! Once you start wearing a jersey that wicks moisture as opposed to a cotton t-shirt, you'll be much, much more comfortable.
+1 to this, but if $$ is an issue, you don't need to wear a bike jersey - just dump the cotton and wear synthetic t-shirts! The point is to get away from cotton. It sucks, it's hot, dirty and ultimately slows you down. Even if it's cold, wear synthetics. They're just better.
 

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Grenouille
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On the list of what not to do...

While I was walking tonite, there goes a cyclist reading her smartphone (not-so-smartphone?) while riding. In traffic. She hits some road obstacle, wobbles, though she recovers. Better to be lucky than smart, I guess.
 

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Deranged Touring Cyclist
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On the list of what not to do...

While I was walking tonite, there goes a cyclist reading her smartphone (not-so-smartphone?) while riding. In traffic. She hits some road obstacle, wobbles, though she recovers. Better to be lucky than smart, I guess.
Wow. At the risk of starting a flame war, I feel that playing with a phone while riding (as opposed to while stopped during a ride) is just dumb. It's bad enough while driving. Playing with a phone while riding - much less while on the road with cars - seems foolhardy to me. If you don't get hit when you bobble this time, it'll happen next time. It's bad/stupid enough when pedestrians do this. Hang up and ride, or stop and read. Seriously.
 

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After you've switched to "bike shorts," remember, they don't last forever. Eventually, the chamois doesn't function anymore. When this happens, know you have used that pair about 6 months too long. :D
 

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Discussion Starter #17
+1 to this, but if $$ is an issue, you don't need to wear a bike jersey - just dump the cotton and wear synthetic t-shirts! The point is to get away from cotton. It sucks, it's hot, dirty and ultimately slows you down. Even if it's cold, wear synthetics. They're just better.

Very good point; my wife doesn't wear a jersey but wears a synthetic running/jogging shirt instead.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Carry some type of ID. Road ID is a popular form that allows you to put contact numbers and such.

I also keep an old drivers license in my saddle bag. I have wound a couple of wraps around the license with electrical tape to use in an emergency repair. Doesnt take much room and serves multiple uses.

The electrical tape tip is genius! Good one!
 

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If you are sharing a road where motor vehicles drive, Hi-Vis clothing and a well-monitored rear-view mirror will help you stay un-collided with. Just last week, a car passed me with its tires running in the "Bike lane". I think the driver was distracted. Good thing I saw it coming and took evasive action. To so many, mirrors are "not cool". One of my friends in that category recently almost got knocked off his bike when a car's right-side mirror struck him in the back. He still trusts the cars to not hit him. Not me. YMMV
 
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