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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well after a few sessions on a bike at the local Y, I am finding the indoor bike far more work than actually riding. Anyone have any kind of comparison vs miles outdoor on the real bike vs miles you ride going no where? Am I the only one that thinks its that much harder than really riding??
 

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Well after a few sessions on a bike at the local Y, I am finding the indoor bike far more work than actually riding. Anyone have any kind of comparison vs miles outdoor on the real bike vs miles you ride going no where? Am I the only one that thinks its that much harder than really riding??
Well after an extensive experience of exactly 20 miles on my new stationary trainer I would tend to agree. I think it may be more mental than physical though. My avg speed was 5 mph higher over 20 miles on the trainer than on the road. Most likely due to the hilly terrain here and the fact that my resistance setting was on low. My first time so will have to tweak that as i learn.

Kind of perplexed that my Garmin registered an extensive elevation change while on the trainer. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Those that do a 100 miles to no where now have me questioning their sanity however. Still at home at the trainer it was really boring. At least at the Y they have a cool tv set up where you can plug in an ear bud and listen to and watch one of about 6 channels while you pedal. Watching Neil Cavuto is as good a reason to pedal as any. At least you learn something from Neil.
 

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Trainer seems much harder for me also I think your right its all mental.
 

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Those that do a 100 miles to no where now have me questioning their sanity however.
I do too, and so do I. ;)

Seriously, though, Carmichael has a chart comparing indoor ride time to outdoor ride time with the following as approximates, and states that when converting an outdoor training ride to an indoor workout, reduce the ride length by 20 percent:

2 hrs inside = 2.5 outside
1.5 inside = 2 out
1.25 in = 1.5 out
45 min in = 1 hr out
 

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I do too, and so do I. ;)

Seriously, though, Carmichael has a chart comparing indoor ride time to outdoor ride time with the following as approximates, and states that when converting an outdoor training ride to an indoor workout, reduce the ride length by 20 percent:

2 hrs inside = 2.5 outside
1.5 inside = 2 out
1.25 in = 1.5 out
45 min in = 1 hr out
I'd say that seems accurate. I know I don't feel like inside is near the workout. No resistance of pushing your body through the wind, of hills, starting and stopping, etc.
 

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After knee and hip replacements I started riding a stationary bike. If 1 mile on the stationary the same as 1 mile biking on the road.
 

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It's gotta get REAL cold and even icy for me to go to the stationary over one of my road bikes.
 

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Those that do a 100 miles to no where now have me questioning their sanity however. Still at home at the trainer it was really boring. At least at the Y they have a cool tv set up where you can plug in an ear bud and listen to and watch one of about 6 channels while you pedal. Watching Neil Cavuto is as good a reason to pedal as any. At least you learn something from Neil.
I felt exactly the same way; I am hoping my new toy will make the indoor training that I do; which admittedly is not a huge amount, thank California living for that little blessing!

I can now have my 20-minute HIIT indoor rides - when I can get back on the bike - with the trainer on the big screen and iTunes blaring something in the background.

I may actually be looking forward to indoor rides again!! LOL!!
 

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Your road handling skills will erode on the trainer. Get a good set of rollers to keep your core involved along with your balance.

As for me I do as little indoor riding as possible. Last winter I managed to ride indoors for a total of 10 hours. That was only because we had two major blizzards.
 

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Im going to have to disagree with you davereo. I didnt notice any erosion of handling skills after a winter on the trainer and I might add, a LOT of trainer time. As a result I got MUCH more comfortable spending time in the drops, which I did not do prior. Then when I got my aero bars I used trainer time to get used to them, get them adjusted, etc. As a result of that, I have gotten much more comfortable in and using the aero bars and holding the bike steady when using them.

In fact, I get so comfortable in them I usually gear down to a smaller cog because I tend to be able to pedal easier in the aero bars than I do on the hoods. In fact, it has come that when the road is flat enough and I want to conserve energy for longer rides I will get down on the aero bar because I can hold a much more consistent pace and as mentioned it seems a bit easier to pedal there

I will also add that the trainer helped me tremendously with regards to just overall performance on the bike and it allows me to work/target specific weaknesses with Trainer Road.

Now I realize to each his/her own and not everyone is the same and results will vary. But for me, personally, I love the trainer. Not as much as riding on the road, but I love riding on the trainer when the weather outside is not good. In fact, this winter, really want to get on the thing and do a half century and work my way up to a full century like that whackoo xela. Though, in all fairness, he has rollers, and I dont.
 

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You learned how to adapt to your new equipment on the trainer. Once on the road you needed to learn how to handle the new riding positions on the road. Aero bars are much more twitchy steering because your hands are closer to the center pivot position of your bars. Steering had to be developed out on the road.

I am aware that you devoted a lot of time on your trainer last year and did a great job of building your endurance. You entered the offseason with a lot of goals and managed to achieve them.

Trainers are a good tool but I feel rollers offer more training benefits.
 

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Yeah, I would agree that rollers are a better option just because you dont have the stabilization of the rear wheel. However, there are pros and cons to both I feel. The rollers will allow more focus on stabilization and form while the traditional trainer allows you to focus a bit more on physical components and most definitely useful for dialing in all the adjustments on a bike. Thats not something I would try to do on a set of rollers.

If I could afford a set of rollers that would work with Trainer Road, Id be all over it though.
 

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I like my trainer for warming up before going out for a ride when it is real cold. Coasting miles may be the difference, you can't coast on the trainer, well you can but no miles show up.
My ¢¢
 

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StormStrikes said:
As a result I got MUCH more comfortable spending time in the drops, which I did not do prior. Then when I got my aero bars I used trainer time to get used to them, get them adjusted, etc. As a result of that, I have gotten much more comfortable in and using the aero bars and holding the bike steady when using them.

In fact, I get so comfortable in them I usually gear down to a smaller cog because I tend to be able to pedal easier in the aero bars than I do on the hoods. In fact, it has come that when the road is flat enough and I want to conserve energy for longer rides I will get down on the aero bar because I can hold a much more consistent pace and as mentioned it seems a bit easier to pedal there
^^ Same here.

However, since we have had very mild winters the past two years, I haven't spent as much time on the trainer as I did the first year I got it. One thing that I can say it definitely helped me with is ride standing and doing it without swaying the bike between my legs. I do about one mile on each of my rides standing and I don't think I would have been motivated to do it if I hadn't put that much time doing it on the trainer. And like you, it really helped when it came to riding on the aerobars. I'm on the aerobars about 90% of the time on each solo ride.
 

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I'm opposite then most of you. I find riding outdoors is harder then riding indoors. Dealing with the elements outside, not being able to control the incline of the road, stops, etc etc I think outside riding is different and tougher then indoor. I got into cycling because of spin class! I do enjoy mixing it up a little of indoor and outdoor cycling though.
 

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Trainer time has minimal sensory stimulation. You don't sense the wind, sun, smells, freedom or danger. The mind is not challenged.
I looked at the trainer today thinking it was time to dust it off.
 

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We get plenty of -40F and there are stretches of winter when we are waiting for it to warm up to -40F so spinning classes are a real asset. The disadvantages are obvious...hot..sweaty...boring...but less so in a spinning class than alone. The big advantage is you don't have to worry about falling over so you can push as hard as you want. I regularly push till I'm blinded by sweat and literally drooling. I get up to 90% (and more) my max HR and well past what would be safe to do on the road. The flywheel makes for a different ride when standing but that has allowed me to stand and train for hills very effectively. I ride year round but in winter my rides are much more limited by temp and the need to not overheat and build up dangerous sweat so indoor trainers are a huge asset to allowing me to start the summer season in much better condition than I would have without it.
 
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