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What is your upper temperature limit for cycling?

  • Limits? We don't need no stinkin' limits (But we need fluids!)

    Votes: 16 38.1%
  • Above 100

    Votes: 4 9.5%
  • Above 90

    Votes: 18 42.9%
  • Above 80

    Votes: 4 9.5%
  • If the a/c is running, its too hot!

    Votes: 0 0.0%
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Premium Member
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Discussion Starter #1
With the continental U.S. undergoing surreal temperatures, along with gum sticking to your shoe worse than usual, cyclists nationally are faced with a conundrum:

Is it too hot to ride?

Granted some cyclists love the heat, some are ambivalent and others despise it. There is always the risk of heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heat stroke. You are your own best judge of risk/benefit for you. Don't push your limits!

For me, I'll ride regardless of heat, I make sure I bring lots of fluids with some frozen so they thaw as I ride while keeping me cooler with the bottles in my jersey pockets. I'm also not resistant to wearing a Camelbak as I'd rather not dehydrate, regardless of fashion faux pas on a road bike.

So this begs the question: "What is your upper temperature limit for cycling with considering humidity?"
 

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My preference would be less than 100 degrees, but humidity has more to do with it than temp. Recently I rode in 105 degrees but humidity was in the 40% range and honestly it wasn't that bad. Normally Atlanta's summer has mid 90's with humidity in the 70-80% range and it's no fun.
 

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Living in Houston means that the head/humidity is just part of life. You can't escape it and can barely hide from it. Hydro up and ride.
 

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Premium Member
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During the dog days of summer my rides tend to be shorter. Riding earlier in the day if you can is the best way to beat the heat.

Two 22 oz bottles of fluid do the trick for me. On real hot days I have jumped right in the the pool with my cycling shorts still on.
 

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Deranged Touring Cyclist
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Back in the late 90s, while visiting Phoenix, AZ, I did over 10mi of singletrack in 113* temps on my MTB. Young. Incredibly stupid/lucky. I was unprepared and rode much farther than I had intended, thinking the heat wasn't that bad. I ended up sick with heat exhaustion. Didn't feel right for weeks afterward.

I would try it again, but only in the event I'd built up to exercising in those temps, first. I was acclimated to 100+ temps at the time, but only insofar as existing, not exercising in the heat. Turns out, there's a difference!

In modern times, I'm working to acclimate the right way by first staying away from Phoenix, second riding in progressively hotter weather as the opportunity arises. So far the hottest I've managed was 96* (super-low humidity).

I consider cycling at 96* now to be more 'real' than the 113* ride was, as I can ride in 96* temps without harming myself. Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate. These days when facing high heat, I ride with 1300ml of gatorade in two bottles and 100oz of H2O in a Camelbak. I ultimately want to tour by bicycle, so my fluid load-out reflects much longer-distance rides than I'm doing now. My ultimate goal is to be able to cycle indefinitely and without injury in temps over 100*.
 

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Two skinny J's
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21,187 Posts
More concerned with humidity really.
 

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Two skinny J's
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21,187 Posts
My vote is in, thank you very much :D
 

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omnivox42 said:
Living in Houston means that the head/humidity is just part of life. You can't escape it and can barely hide from it. Hydro up and ride.
It's the same here in Florida. I normally ride in the mornings, but I have ridden during all time periods (except very early mornings). It's always hot and humid here and you get acclimated to it.
 

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Two skinny J's
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It's the same here in Florida. I normally ride in the mornings, but I have ridden during all time periods (except very early mornings). It's always hot and humid here and you get acclimated to it.
Acclimation is only a myth and only exists as an adjective for writers :D, it doesn't actually ever happen out here in the real world :D....least that's my take on it :cool:
 

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If you've ever had to stop to fix a flat in this weather you will have discovered it's easier to ride in the heat than not to ride in it. :)
 

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75 if I had my choice! 90's if it's a race.
 

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Man i feel Like such a weather wimp! I've ridden above 90 but I don't Like it. course If you want to talk about how cold......... 65 is hot in buffalo!




All in All very interesting responses, but be careful in the heat, sometimes by the time you feel there is a problem it's too late. Especially if you still have a way to go. Even with water it is possible to overheat.
 

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Total noob (& forum admin)
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Acclimation is only a myth and only exists as an adjective for writers :D, it doesn't actually ever happen out here in the real world :D....least that's my take on it :cool:
Lived by the beach until 6 years ago. Not only do we not have humidity up here at 6,000 feet, we're a bit short on oxygen.
 
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