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Senior Member
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Discussion Starter #1
So it seems that Indianapolis is putting in new bike lanes ... Thank goodness. But people are complaing some of the things I've read just goes to show how stupid people can be its crazy I'm sure some of the complaints are. Justified but some were just stupid such as that's what side walks are for and bikes have no right to be on the street .. I on the other hand would like to see them on every road short of interstates I would love to have bike James and ride from Franklin to indy with some safety any way.. I think its cool and thought I'd share
 

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Recreational and Utility Rider :)
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I wish they'd do more, BIKE LANES here in Co. Springs, they want to spend LOTS of money on "pretty trails" but bike LANES get you where you really NEED to go, jmho. I've talked to the powers that be but I just get wishy-washer type answers, rats! Enjoy your bike lanes and ride a LOT! :)
 

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Eocyclist
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So it seems that Indianapolis is putting in new bike lanes ... Thank goodness. But people are complaing some of the things I've read just goes to show how stupid people can be its crazy I'm sure some of the complaints are. Justified but some were just stupid such as that's what side walks are for and bikes have no right to be on the street .. I on the other hand would like to see them on every road short of interstates I would love to have bike James and ride from Franklin to indy with some safety any way.. I think its cool and thought I'd share
Hi mom-of-3
I was riding around downtown Indy last weekend and like the way it's becoming more bike friendly. But it's going to take the motorists there a little time to get used to some of the bike lane configurations ... like [ame="http://maps.google.com/maps?q=Indianapolis,+IN&hl=en&ll=39.771158,-86.156743&spn=0.001144,0.002567&sll=41.506146,-87.6356&sspn=0.142695,0.32856&vpsrc=6&hnear=Indianapolis,+Marion,+Indiana&t=h&z=19"]this one on New York between Meridian and Pensylvania[/ame]

Four cyclists were east bound on New York where the bike lane shifts left to allow for the right turn only lane. An SUV driver decided to pass us on the right, then tried to cut back across the bike lane to continue straight on New York. He started to pass, but misjudged our speed, and only got by half of the group before getting to the corner, where he had to hold up in the right turn only lane until we passed him. There were 3 or 4 drivers right behind him wanting to turn right, so his impatience held up 3 or 4 other drivers.

I think bike lanes encourage more people to cycle and would like to see more of them. Unfortunately, they do give cyclists a false sense of security and have to be used with care to avoid dangerous situations like turning motorists, road debris, and the door zone.
 

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Back in the Saddle
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106 Posts
The Indy Mayor is a rider, so is committed to greatly increasing the number of bike lane miles. Is disappointing to see the news stories that lean towards drivers, the comments on websites from drivers who would rather be texting than paying attention, and then other cyclists complaining that bike lanes aren't the answer and are unsafe. The city has come a long way in recent years in regards to cycling, and we have the Mayor to thank for that. Is sad when non-cyclists post that the bike lanes are "election tactics" - when he's been pushing this and developing the lanes since he was first elected.

Next step this city needs is education for both cyclists and drivers about cyclist rights on the road (bike lanes or not), cyclist etiquette, and how both cyclists and cars can safely be on the road together. Unfortunately, most drivers have no idea what the shallows mean, know that there is a 3 foot passing law, and I'd say that most believe we aren't supposed to ride on "their" roads.
 

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Senior Member
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Discussion Starter #5
The Indy Mayor is a rider, so is committed to greatly increasing the number of bike lane miles. Is disappointing to see the news stories that lean towards drivers, the comments on websites from drivers who would rather be texting than paying attention, and then other cyclists complaining that bike lanes aren't the answer and are unsafe. The city has come a long way in recent years in regards to cycling, and we have the Mayor to thank for that. Is sad when non-cyclists post that the bike lanes are "election tactics" - when he's been pushing this and developing the lanes since he was first elected.

Next step this city needs is education for both cyclists and drivers about cyclist rights on the road (bike lanes or not), cyclist etiquette, and how both cyclists and cars can safely be on the road together. Unfortunately, most drivers have no idea what the shallows mean, know that there is a 3 foot passing law, and I'd say that most believe we aren't supposed to ride on "their" roads.
Yes I agree 100% it should be part of the dl written test so people know . I ride more for transportation and those lanes are a huge help I hate riding on the side of the foX ans doscing road kill and trash
 

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Eocyclist
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742 Posts
...[snip]...
Next step this city needs is education for both cyclists and drivers about cyclist rights on the road (bike lanes or not), cyclist etiquette, and how both cyclists and cars can safely be on the road together. Unfortunately, most drivers have no idea what the shallows mean, know that there is a 3 foot passing law, and I'd say that most believe we aren't supposed to ride on "their" roads.
I think Indy is well situated to take that next step. About a half dozen Indy area cyclists went through the League of American Bicyclists Instructor Certification program recently. You should see some LAB Traffic Skills classes for cyclists as well as other cyclist and driver education programs sponsored by Bicycle Indiana and INDYCOG soon. If you want cyclist and motorist education there, consider supporting those programs when they're announed.

BTW, are you sure that Indiana has a 3 ft law? IIRC, one was proposed two years ago, along with other revisions to the bicycle related laws, but the package never made it to a vote.
 

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Well actually I wouldn't object to a bike along the interstate IF it road on the emergency shoulder for the entire time. Yet if the highway had a shoulder, (the one used for emergency parking and stops) and the bikes were limited to that area, I see no reason why a bike would cause a safety issue to the car doing 70 in the traffic lane. Sure would make bike touring much easier.
 

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Back in the Saddle
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Sorry, the 3 foot law is in Indianapolis, versus the whole State of IN.

the programs that IndyCog (of which I'm a supporter) and Bicycle Indiana are ones that will be great for those of us interested in cycling. What we don't have (and I doubt any state has) is any sort of real education for everyone else. I know that 25+ years ago when I took my DL test in IL, there were questions about how to drive with cyclists, and as a cyclist. We also had cycling education in grade school where we learned hand signals, etc. None of that exists today.

And while I'm a huge fan of cycling education, no amount of education about driving with cyclists will help until we start enforcing traffic laws for everyone, which most big cities are bad at. Police resources go towards crime (which is fine) but has created an environment where drivers know they can run red-lights, speed, not signal, etc without any real fear of consequences.
 

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The only bike lane near me hear in Gwinnett County Georgia is along Sugarloaf parkway. Other than considering it for early morning weekend long workout rides I honestly don't use them. Others do and increased usage will help but it this suburban metropolis they just aren't safe enough for me. Most along this busy route are commuters with one hand on their cell phone and maybe the other on the wheel. Seen way too many use the bike lane for quick entry into turns and such. My commute is nearly 8 miles one way each day and I use the neighborhood roads for most of it to (1) make it long enough for a decent work out and (2) so I am as safe as possibly. Atlanta just went thru the huge transportation plan with a proposed city "beltway" and all with basically zero support for biking.
 

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Eocyclist
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Sorry, the 3 foot law is in Indianapolis, versus the whole State of IN.

the programs that IndyCog (of which I'm a supporter) and Bicycle Indiana are ones that will be great for those of us interested in cycling. What we don't have (and I doubt any state has) is any sort of real education for everyone else. I know that 25+ years ago when I took my DL test in IL, there were questions about how to drive with cyclists, and as a cyclist. We also had cycling education in grade school where we learned hand signals, etc. None of that exists today.
The League of Illinois Bicyclists developed a program for use in IL drivers ed classes. Over the last 2 years the class materials were presented to most of the drivers ed instructors in the state. Here is a link to a post on that project from last year. Time will tell if it gets thru to the new drivers. At least it's a try.

And while I'm a huge fan of cycling education, no amount of education about driving with cyclists will help until we start enforcing traffic laws for everyone, which most big cities are bad at. Police resources go towards crime (which is fine) but has created an environment where drivers know they can run red-lights, speed, not signal, etc without any real fear of consequences.
Ain't that the truth. It would be nice to see more enforcement aimed at both motorists and cyclists.
 

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So it seems that Indianapolis is putting in new bike lanes ... Thank goodness. But people are complaining some of the things I've read just goes to show how stupid people can be its crazy I'm sure some of the complaints are. Justified but some were just stupid such as that's what side walks are for and bikes have no right to be on the street .. I on the other hand would like to see them on every road short of interstates I would love to have bike James and ride from Franklin to indy with some safety any way.. I think its cool and thought I'd share
How are the new bike lanes being installed? Are they actually improving things for cyclists or are they adding new safety hazards for cyclists?

Such as are they being installed within the "door zone" of on street parking? Are they being installed to the left (the safe spot) or to the right of dedicated or shared right turn lanes? Are they being installed far enough away from the right hand edge/curb/gutter pan so that cyclists have a clear and safe area to ride in? How long before you end up with a "mandatory bike lane use law?" If you don't already have one.

While I agree that (at least in theory) that bike lanes are a good thing. Sadly there are plenty of LEOs, motorists and judges who seem to think that we cyclists are required to "ALWAYS" ride in the bike lane, and that if there isn't a bike lane present then that must mean that we cyclists aren't allowed to ride on that particular road. Also if they're a "protected" bike lane they can also increase the danger depending on how they are "protected," i.e. if they're "protected by having on street parking to the left of the bike lane how are drivers suppose to see the bikes for the cars "protecting" them? Will they be installed on all roads or just those over a certain speed limit?

Will drivers know that more likely than not that the 3', 4' or whatever safe passing law includes the bike lane? Also sadly bike lanes also give cyclists a false sense of security. Down here in Florida we have had a number of cyclists killed while riding in the bike lane. In at least two that I am aware of they were hit and runs, and in one the driver crossed the bridge and struck the cyclist throwing her into the water below.

So while they're good and have their place they need to be installed with some thought.
 

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Back in the Saddle
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How are the new bike lanes being installed? Are they actually improving things for cyclists or are they adding new safety hazards for cyclists?

Such as are they being installed within the "door zone" of on street parking? Are they being installed to the left (the safe spot) or to the right of dedicated or shared right turn lanes? Are they being installed far enough away from the right hand edge/curb/gutter pan so that cyclists have a clear and safe area to ride in? How long before you end up with a "mandatory bike lane use law?" If you don't already have one.

While I agree that (at least in theory) that bike lanes are a good thing. Sadly there are plenty of LEOs, motorists and judges who seem to think that we cyclists are required to "ALWAYS" ride in the bike lane, and that if there isn't a bike lane present then that must mean that we cyclists aren't allowed to ride on that particular road. Also if they're a "protected" bike lane they can also increase the danger depending on how they are "protected," i.e. if they're "protected by having on street parking to the left of the bike lane how are drivers suppose to see the bikes for the cars "protecting" them? Will they be installed on all roads or just those over a certain speed limit?

Will drivers know that more likely than not that the 3', 4' or whatever safe passing law includes the bike lane? Also sadly bike lanes also give cyclists a false sense of security. Down here in Florida we have had a number of cyclists killed while riding in the bike lane. In at least two that I am aware of they were hit and runs, and in one the driver crossed the bridge and struck the cyclist throwing her into the water below.

So while they're good and have their place they need to be installed with some thought.
Indy is doing a pretty good job with putting the bike lanes to the left of the dedicated right turn lanes, and then painting bike lanes (green I think) where cars would cross them to get to that turn lane. The older bike lanes are in the door zones, but newer ones notsomuch, and even some protected two-way bike lanes (i forget what those are called) in some areas. The Mayor is the force behind the bike lanes, and the gentleman heading up that division for the Mayor has been a part of the leading cycling advocacy group for a number of years.

So while not perfect, but better than in the past and the number of miles of bike lanes and trails is increasing quickly, with an eye on connecting all the pieces and parts in order to allow for better paths from areas outside of downtown.
 

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Indy is doing a pretty good job with putting the bike lanes to the left of the dedicated right turn lanes, and then painting bike lanes (green I think) where cars would cross them to get to that turn lane. The older bike lanes are in the door zones, but newer ones notsomuch, and even some protected two-way bike lanes (i forget what those are called) in some areas. The Mayor is the force behind the bike lanes, and the gentleman heading up that division for the Mayor has been a part of the leading cycling advocacy group for a number of years.

So while not perfect, but better than in the past and the number of miles of bike lanes and trails is increasing quickly, with an eye on connecting all the pieces and parts in order to allow for better paths from areas outside of downtown.
That's good to hear. Around here, we have plenty i.e. too many bike lanes that are in the "door zone." As well as bike lanes that are positioned to the right of either dedicated right turn lanes or shared through/right turn lanes. Or they've been installed on roads where the lane is too narrow for motorists to pass allowing for the 3' buffer that they're suppose to leave. Or they're installed around curves, curves where I have personally witnessed numerous cars "drifting" into the bike lane. Or on roads with an outside lane that is wide enough to be divided into two lanes.

And worse is that a lot of them start and stop with no rhythm or reason or that they do not connect to anything or actually go anywhere. Such as along 1st St. N. here in St. Pete there is a bike lane on both sides that starts at 62nd Ave. N. and goes north to 77th Ave. N. where it terminates. It doesn't connect to anything, nor does it go anywhere. As it ends about a block from the entrance of a small local park.

One of the roads that I ride on a regular basis has a bike lane that stops and starts with no rhythm or reason with the bike lane in several places only being a block or two in length. Or it's too narrow.

One of the good things that I've seen "popping up" is that on certain roads we are getting sharrows installed as well as the bicycle icon painted over the long leg of induction loop coils to show cyclists where to stop in order to be detected by the sensor so as to trip the light.

Also here in St. Pete we have at least one road with a two-way bicycle lane running along one side of a one-way street. It is "protected" by a combination of a low (curb height) median as well as a "dog leg" of sorts at both ends of the blocks so as to "slow" cyclists down.

I've ridden on this road in the direction of traffic, I don't know how comfortable I'd be riding on it against the flow of traffic.
 
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