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Discussion Starter #1
So now I have my first bike and in preparation for my first event (not a race), a 50 mile ride, I'm just wondering what exactly i might want to consider getting/upgrading.

For those who don't know, I have a Specialized Globe Vienna. So far I got a Giro helmet, BG gloves, and bottle/cage. Ive only gotten to take it out a few times due to weather..hopefully this rain finally STOPS..lol. Anyways, in the rides that I have taken, the saddle has been pretty comfortable. I have heard a lot of people upgrading that though. I guess as I do more distance, I can see if id need to do that or not.

I'm thinking that my next purchase will need to be a computer. Ive seen some people using their iPhone however my concern with that is the battery dying during long rides. I really don't want to spend a lot (at least for now). I saw a number of simple ones with the ODO, time, speed, etc. Are there any suggestions on a decent one? I'm not sure which is better (wired or wireless).

The bike also just has the plain flat pedals. Is it suggested I upgrade those? If so, what kind? I dont think i'm ready for clip-less or anything like that. Honestly, i'm not sure how those work.

Any other suggestions as to what I may want to consider getting/upgrading?

Thanks!!
 

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Two skinny J's
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So now I have my first bike and in preparation for my first event (not a race), a 50 mile ride, I'm just wondering what exactly i might want to consider getting/upgrading.
I'm just curious how much riding you have or will have by the time you make your first 50 mile ride? If it's your first bike you might just want to get some miles in before you try 50 miles and from that see what you might need to upgrade, just my .02 worth.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the input :)

Ive done up to 25 miles so far (not with this bike though). The 50 mile ride is at the end of June so i'm trying to do some longer rides on the weekends.
 

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First of all I noticed you are in Yinzer country. Going 50 miles there without some prep is going to be a real challenge, even if you are fit otherwise. Fifty miles there is all hills and even a fit runner will be using different muscles to deal with those hills. A simple computer will help you know how far and how fast you get there. Some might recommend one that has the ability to measure your cadence. I know someone that says spin spin spin. I would not recommend the iphone for anything other than a phone call if you need it.

Some things I would also recommend that you carry are some basic repair tools and supplies. You should be able to fix a flat, make some basic adjustments, and repairs beside the road. Things like a pump or co 2 to inflate a tire, a bike multi tool, spare tube, tire boot, tire patches, and some include some basic first aid stuff too. A 20 mile walk home is a long way because you don't have a way to fix a flat.

Going off without preparation is almost as smart as being the guy that wears a Steelers Suck tee shirt to a game at Heinz Field. Neither is very condusive to getting home in one piece. grin



At some point you are going to want the clipless pedals and shoes
 

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Discussion Starter #5
LOL, I do like your analogy showing up at Heinz field with a Steelers suck shirt...Thats downright dangerous....LMAO.

Seriously though, I hear ya. I'm going to be training pretty hard for the next 2 months. Fortunately, there are plenty of hills to train on.

I do need to buy one of those wedge bags for under the seat for the bike tools, extra tube, etc. They do have SAGs but they recommend being able to fix yourself since theres no way to tell how long it would take for them to get to you. They suggest having 2 bottles so Im thinking of getting another cage. Only problem with that is im wondering where I could place a punp. Maybe under the top bar?

Again, thanks for all the info!!! Very much appreciated!
 

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You won't have a sag while training and if you are ready for a 50 mile ride, you are going to far enough from home that a walk back is going to be a pain. Some are pretty small. A co 2 inflate will fit in the bag with the rest of the stuff. Pumps sometimes have a mount. You will need two bottles if not now then later.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Ok, thanks!

Ill go check that out tomorrow or Friday :)
 

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spin... spin.. spin
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basics
tubes
multi tool
pump or co2 pump (i like the old school pump... unless racing co2 cost more and is only faster)

as far as a computer goes a watch will tell you how long it took and a map will tell you how far and from that you can get an average speed. so, you want one that shows cadence and some other stuff or it is not that worth while. i used to always use them and now i don't even own one. when i ride i find that i over focus on the thing and forget why i love to ride. however, almost everyone i ride with has one on their bike. so i am the exception. if you can not tell what cadence you keep and approximate rpms without it get one for sure.
i will buy clip-less pedals over any computer. they improve the cyclists and ride quality.
if your saddle is comfy keep it.
this is just what i have found to work. you may be totally different.
 

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Jay
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I like a computer because I can look at the mileage at any time and see how far I have to ride back. I'm also OCD about average speed and always like to see the little arrow pointing up. I really like clipless pedals for long rides but I'm starting to go back to platform/clips and straps for when I just want to hop on the bike and go w/o suiting up. One of the great things about cycling is it's a very individualized sport and one size does not fit all.
 

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The pump should mount under your bottle cage. Between the cage and the frame.

I wouldn't worry about clipless peddles until you get more comfortable riding cause they can cause you to wreck(forgetting to unclip when you stop). I have been riding for about eight months now without out them and don't really feel like I need them.
 

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Clipless pedals not only can cause you to tip over, while learning they probably will once or twice. You figure it out really quickly though and what they add definitely is worth the transition. They let you provide power not only on the down stroke of the pedal, but allow you to pull up as well. I was like most everyone else. I didn't think I needed them either till I used them.

As always my last and best tommy tip over from a hung cleat happened to be in front of a 25 year old drop dead gorgeous blond that would have been out of my league anyway. Still it ain't the place you want to go over. At least she was nice and didn't laugh at me to my face. Ever notice that nothing like that ever happens to you on a bike when no one is watching???
 

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two water bottles
mini pump (mounts behind water bottle cage)
padded cycling shorts
cycle computer, this way you can measure your progress. I went with a wired one (cheaper) that has the cadence function. I feel I wasted my money with cadence cuz it's easy enough to tell by doing the math in your head.

under seat bag which has:
patch kit
spare inner tube
tire wrenchs to change tire
I.D.
money
cell phone (assume you own one, I don't but I'm strange)

miles in the saddle, only then will you know if you want to upgrade seat (probably not)or pedals & shoes (probably yes). I wouldn't suggest you rush on upgrades unilt you get many miles on the bike.

ENJOY THE RIDE
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks for all of the input! Its definitely helpful and glad there are a lot of great people on the site.

I have a long weekend coming up so im hoping to get a couple good rides in! :D
 

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Just remember on your 50 mile ride there will be those people that take off at the beginning and burn out half way thru start out easy and build you will finish stronger and feel much better.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
A very good point. I just have to keep in mind that its not a race and more importantly to enjoy the ride.
 

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Yesterday tired old man, Today retired old man
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I would change a flat on the rear of the bike befor I went, just so you know. I would not ride the day befor or just a 5 miler slow and easy the day befor. I allways have my Fignewtons a cupple of 2 packs should be enough. Have FUN thats the main thing .

This is what I have on the bike + a pump
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Good advice for sure. Thanks for the pic too, help to visualize everything I need.

Went out and bought a wireless computer and padded bike shorts last night. Im adding things as I go along..piece by piece..lol :D
 

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spin... spin.. spin
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to clarify about clipless pedals... i don't have them on my commuter bike it has flats. i ride it about 22 miles a day.
but my regular road bike has them. i climb some hills that i am not sure i could climb without them. while they help with being able to pull the pedal as well as push it, remember they also insure that your foot is in the position that you set up your bike to place it in. in other words without clipless pedals you do not have as proper of a fit to the bike. of course sometimes they cause a spill or two. i have never fallen on my road bike from them but on my mtb i have wrecked from not being able to unclip.

cadence is the single most important thing in cycling.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
yeah, I can imagine it might be a little more difficult on a mtb. You do have a good point about the positioning. I have read that they do help a lot in that aspect. How do you unclip from the pedal anyways?
 

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spin... spin.. spin
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most unclip the same... simply turn your heel away from the bike usually around ten to fifteen degrees and it disengages. after you get used to it disengaging is automatic and without thought.
while i love them they are not necessary but helpful.
much easier to get out of than toe clips(the old strap kind)
see if your local bike shop will let you try them out. some shops won't but some will.
 
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