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tall old member
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just ordered two new tires. My back gravel tire has turned into a slick. I’m not planning on changing it until the cords are showing or it goes flat. The front tire is still good. My plan is to not change the front tire until it is worn out. Is there any advantage in changing both at the same time?

The new tires are the same size but a different brand.
 

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Deranged Touring Cyclist
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6,122 Posts
I just ordered two new tires. My back gravel tire has turned into a slick. I’m not planning on changing it until the cords are showing or it goes flat. The front tire is still good. My plan is to not change the front tire until it is worn out. Is there any advantage in changing both at the same time?

The new tires are the same size but a different brand.
I have ridden on dissimilar tires and the worst consequence was the OCD-like way it drove me nuts to have tires of significantly different appearance front and back. If not for that, I'd have ridden that way for longer. Provided the performance characteristics are similar and you're aware of any differences in traction, running differing tires front and rear seems reasonable to me.
 

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Old, fat, and slow
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1,271 Posts
A lot of people rotate tires because the front lasts two or three times as long as the rear.

I put wider tires on the front of my car .... but it was front-wheel drive. But I guess they were probably also slightly greater in circumference --- killing my gas mileage.
 

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I definitely rotate my tires. The rear wears faster.
This allows me more miles between changing both at the same time.

I also change to what I call “winter tires,” this time of year through late spring. (Even though this weekend is supposed to be in the upper 70’s).
I do this because my beautiful state uses tiny cinders & salt to combat winter road hazards. My winter tires are supposedly built with greater resistance to punctures….. which those pesky little cinders are notorious for creating.

You might ask, is there a drawback to this method?

I say a resounding YES!!!
Right now i have in “My cart”! Two sets of tires. I’m looking at $200+ just for tires.
 

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Deranged Touring Cyclist
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6,122 Posts
I used to rotate my touring bike's tires and agree that the practice makes them last longer. It also keeps the newest and theoretically most reliable rubber on the front, where a blowout at speed can be...an issue. Rotation worked well while I was running a single brand of tire, but the brand eventually came up short and I began experimenting with others. As I said earlier, it preys on my mind to run dissimilar tires. Foolish, but there it is. I gave up rotation then, but may take it up again. My most recent try at tires for the touring bike is a set of Bontragers that I'm pretty happy with thus far.
 

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tall old member
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1,609 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I used to rotate my touring bike's tires and agree that the practice makes them last longer. It also keeps the newest and theoretically most reliable rubber on the front, where a blowout at speed can be...an issue. Rotation worked well while I was running a single brand of tire, but the brand eventually came up short and I began experimenting with others. As I said earlier, it preys on my mind to run dissimilar tires. Foolish, but there it is. I gave up rotation then, but may take it up again. My most recent try at tires for the touring bike is a set of Bontragers that I'm pretty happy with thus far.
I have always had really good luck with Bontrager hard case race light tires on my road touring bike. Never had a flat and they held up for many thousands of miles.
These new gravel tires I just bought were $125.00 for the pair. I haven’t mounted them yet. Still debating on going tubeless. These new tires seem flimsy to me compared to my Bontrager tires. I’ll probably mount them with tubes and if I have flats then I’ll convert them to tubeless.
 
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