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Pedaling Old Man
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68 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Am I the only one that after a while of riding my fingers and hands start to go numb and I have to take them off the grip and shake them a little to get the blood flowing again....:eek:
 

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Rat Biker
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432 Posts
Nope I get that to more so since I broke both my wrists. One reason why I changed the handlebar on my bike but yeah I have to take my hands off not at the same time mind you LOL.
 

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Premium Member
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3,198 Posts
It's usually a result of compressing a nerve in your hand. Take a look at this, see if this is consistent with what you are feeling and which area of your hand is going to sleep, and concentrate on putting less pressure on that part of your hand either through modifying your handlebar set-up, getting some padded gloves, or just simply moving your hand position often.

Cyclist's Hands: Overcoming overuse injuries
 

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Pedaling Old Man
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68 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Great artical Xela, that is exactly whats happening and I do wear gel gloves but the constant pressure on the nerves are what does it. Maybe by adjusting my hold on the grip I can eliviate this some...
 

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Yesterday tired old man, Today retired old man
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4,311 Posts
When I first got my Fuji Absolute my hands would be numb on a 25- 35 mile ride. I put a lot more weight on my hands on that bike, but the more I rode the more relaxed I got on it and I don't seam to have that trubble now. I was gripping the bar harder and not useing my bar ends at first I am sure.
 

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657 Posts
Nice article Xela...

I know when I first started riding my road bike I would get numbness bad in all my fingers. I found that my problem was that I was unknowingly putting a death grip on my handlebars. I guess subconsciously I wasn't confident in my bike handling skills so I would squeeze the crap out of the bars. Ironically, this method most likely diminished my bike handling skills. This concept was verified when I began racing and joined a team. My first few rides in a fast pace line, I found the numbness coming back. Sure enough, the stress of the pace line was causing that death grip again. I really had to make a conscious effort to relax on the bike and over time I got to a normal grip and I haven't had a problem since (unless I am riding in sub 30 degree weather). And what do you know, my bike handling improved too.
 

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Pedaling Old Man
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68 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I think I know what the problem is, I put a lot of weight on my hands at the grips. I don't have a death grip on the bars as I just basicly rest my hands on them. It's the weight I believe that I put on them. I have bought a pair of bar ends that I will install and maybe by using them during my rides (switching back and forth from the grips to the bar ends) the numbness will stay away.
 

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657 Posts
I hate to mention this, but another solution to the issue you addressed is core strength. My least favorite thing to do (and talk about) is strengthening the core. If you have good core muscles, you won't be supporting as much of your upper body weight with your hands; thus reducing the numbness.

It sounds like your on your way to a solution. Good luck.
 

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Back in the Saddle
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106 Posts
moving hands around, and core strength. Those really seem to be two of the best solutions. I have less of the numb hands when my route forces me to shift, brake, and move around more. It is the routes with long stretches of riding without stopping or turning that cause the most numbness.
 

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Pedaling Old Man
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68 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I think core strength is a great answer and something I really need to work on for sure. As far as movement is conceerned I agree with that also. When I am on a busy route, shifting, turning and braking my hand don't bother me at all.
 

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Bent Newbie - old rider
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144 Posts
My answer matches PBM's............
 
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